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BULLETIN   OF   YALE   UNIVERSITY 

OBITUARY  RECORD 

OF 

YALE  GRADUATES 


1915-1920 


V, 


NEW  HAVEN 
PUBLISHED  BY  THE  UNIVERSITY 

SIXTEENTH  SERIES    •  AUGUST,  1920   •  NUMBER  ELEVEN 


L2> 

BULLETIN  OF  YALE  UNIVERSITY 

Entered  as  second-class  matter,  August  30,  1906,  at  the 
post-office  at  New  Haven,  Conn.,  under  the  Act  of  Congress 
of  July  16,  1894. 

Acceptance  for  mailing  at  the  special  rate  of  postage  pro- 
vided for  in  Section  1 103,  Act  of  October  3,  1917,  authorized 
August  12,  191 8. 

The  Bulletin,  which  is  issued  semi-monthly,  includes: 

1 .  The  University  Catalogue. 

2.  The  Reports  of  the  President  and  Treasurer. 

3.  The  Catalogues  of  the  several  Schools. 

4.  The  Alumni  Directory  and  the  Quinquennial  Catalogue. 

5.  The  Obituary  Record. 


'> 


OBITUARY  RECORD 

or 

GRADUATES  OF  YALE  DNIYERSITY 

Deceased  during  the  year  ending 
JULY  U   191G 


INCLUDING  THE   RECORD    OF  A   FEW  WHO    DIED    PREVIOUSLY 
HITHERTO    UNREPORTED 


[No.  I  of  the  Seventh  Printed  Series,  and  No.  75  of  the  whole  Record.    The 
present  Series  consists  of  five  numbers,] 


OBITUARY   RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES  OF  YALE  UNIVERSITY 

Deceased  during  the  year  ending 
July  i,  1916, 

Including  the  Record  of  a  few  who  died  previously,  hitherto  unreported 

[No.  I  of  the  Seventh  Printed  Series,  and  No.  75  of  the  whole  Record. 
The  present  Series  consists  of  five  numbers] 


I 


YALE  COLLEGE 

(academical  department) 

David  Fisher  Atwater,  B.A.   1839 

Born  October  29,  1817,  in  North  Branford,  Conn. 
Died  May  2,  1916,  in  Springfield,  Mass. 

David  Fisher  Atwater,  a  descendant  of  David  Atwater, 
who  came  to  New  Haven  Colony  in  June,  1637,  i'^  the  ship 
Rector,  was  born  October  29,  1817,  in  North  Branford, 
Conn.,  where  his  father,  Rev.  Charles  Atwater  (B.A.  1805), 
held  the  pastorate  of  the  Congregational  Church.  His 
mother  was  Mary,  daughter  of  Miles  and  Abigail  Ann 
(Beach)  Merwin  and  sister  of  Rev.  Samuel  Merwin,  a 
graduate  of  the  College  in  1802;  two  years  after  the  death 
of  Mr.  Atwater  in  1825,  she  was  married  to  Mr.  Abijah 
Fisher. 

His  preparatory  training  was  received  at  the  Wilton  Acad- 
emy in  Wilton,  Conn.,  and  in  1835  he  entered  Yale,  grad- 
uating from  the  College  four  years  later.  He  took  the 
degree  of  Doctor  of  Medicine  at  Yale  in  1842,  after  spend- 
ing two  years  in  the  Medical  Department  and  serving  for  a 
time  as  assistant  physician  at  Bellevue  Hospital  in  New 
York  City. 


2  YALE  COLLEGE 

He  then  opened  an  office  in  Brooklyn,  N.  Y.,  and  built 
up  a  large  practice.  For  several  years,  he  served  as  health 
officer,  and,  during  the  cholera  epidemic  of  1848,  he  had 
charge  of  the  hospital  for  the  insane  at  Flatbush.  He  was 
at  one  time  surgeon  of  the  Sixty-fourth  Regiment,  New 
York  State  Infantry.  He  served  on  the  Board  of  Alder- 
men, and  was  a  charter  member  of  the  American  Medical 
Association,  the  New  England  Society  of  Brooklyn,  the 
Society  for  the  Improvement  of  the  Condition  of  the  Poor, 
and  of  the  Church  of  the  Pilgrims  of  Brooklyn.  In  1853, 
on  account  of  impaired  health,  he  moved  to  Cleveland,  Ohio, 
and  gave  his  attention  to  the  care  of  property  in  that  city, 
where  he  was  an  elder  in  the  First  Presbyterian  Church. 
Returning  to  the  East  in  1864,  he  settled  at  Bridgeport, 
Conn.  During  his  residence  of  nineteen  years  there,  he 
was  a  director  of  the  Bridgeport  National  Bank  and  of  the 
Public  Library.  Since  1883,  his  home  had  been  in  Spring- 
field, Mass.,  and  for  a  long  time  he  was  an  active  worker 
in  the  South  Congregational  Church,  being  its  auditor  for 
a  number  of  years.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Connecticut 
Valley  Congregational  Club. 

Dr.  Atwater  had  had  the  distinction  of  being  the  oldest 
graduate  of  both  the  College  and  the  School  of  Medicine 
since  191 1.  He  had  continued  various  activities  up  to 
within  a  short  time  of  his  death,  which  occurred  at  his  home 
on  May  2,  1916.  Until  recently.  Dr.  Atwater  took  his  daily 
walk,  and  read  the  papers.  His  faculties  never  failed.  He 
was  buried  in  Peabody  Cemetery  at  Springfield. 

He  was  married  in  Sharon,  Conn.,  September  14,  1848, 
to  Sarah  A.,  daughter  of  Dr.  John  Sears  and  Almira 
(Gould)  Sears  and  a  direct  descendant  of  Elder  Brewster 
and  Governor  Bradford  of  Plymouth  Colony.  Her  death 
occurred  February  13,  1910.  Their  two  children, — Mary 
Merwin  and  Charles  Brewster,  the  latter  a  non-graduate 
member  of  the  College  Class  of  1879, — survive.  Dr. 
Atwater  was  a  nephew  of  Rev.  Jeremiah  Atwater  (B.A. 
1793),  first  president  of  both  Middlebury  College  and  Dick- 
inson College,  whose  sons,  William  and  John  Phelps,  grad- 
uated from  the  College  in  1827  and  1834,  respectively,  the 
latter  being  also  a  graduate  of  the  School  of  Medicine  in 
1837.  He  was  related  to  Rev.  Dr.  Lyman  Hotchkiss 
Atwater  (B.A.  183 1)  and  Wyllys  Atwater  (B.A.  1843). 


I839-I844 


George  Slocum  Folger  Savage,  B.A.  1844 

Born  June  29,  1817,  in  Upper  Middletown  (now  Cromwell),  Conn. 
Died  August  6,  1915,  in  Chicago,  111. 

George  Slocum  Folger  Savage,  son  of  Absalom  Savage, 
a  sea  captain,  and  Sarah  (Wilcox)  Savage,  was  born  in 
Upper  Middletown  (now  Cromwell),  Conn.,  June  29,  1817. 
He  received  his  preparatory  training  at  the  academy  at 
Cromwell,  and  in  1840  entered  Yale  as  a  member  of  the 
Class  of  1844. 

In  the  fall  after  his  graduation  from  the  College,  he 
entered  Andover  Theological  Seminary,  but  after  a  year 
returned  to  New  Haven,  and  completed  his  theological 
studies  at  Yale.  On  September  28,  1847,  he  was  ordained  at 
Middletown,  Conn.,  as  a  home  missionary  of  the  Congrega- 
tional Church,  and  the  following  day  left  for  the  West  to 
engage  in  missionary  work  under  the  auspices  of  the  Amer- 
ican Home  Missionary  Society.  He  became  pastor  of  the 
Congregational  Church  at  St.  Charles,  111.,  the  following 
November,  and  continued  there  for  the  next  twelve  years. 
During  part  of  that  time,  he  served  as  corresponding  editor 
for  the  Prairie  Herald  and  the  Congregatiomil  Herald.  In 
i860,  having  accepted  a  position  with  the  American  Tract 
Society  as  secretary  for  the  West,  he  removed  to  Chicago, 
111.,  where  he  had  since  made  his  home.  He  severed  his 
connection  with  that  organization  in  1870,  and  became 
Western  secretary  for  the  Congregational  Publishing 
Society.  Two  years  later,  he  accepted  an  appointment  as 
financial  secretary  of  the  Chicago  Theological  Seminary,  a 
position  which  he  held  until  1886.  Since  that  time,  he  had 
held  no  salaried  position. 

From  its  inception  in  1854  until  1903,  he  had  served  as 
secretary  and  a  director  of  the  Seminary.  The  degree  of 
Doctor  of  Divinity  was  conferred  upon  him  by  Grinnell 
College  in  1870  and  by  Chicago  Theological  Seminary  in 
1903.  Since  1850,  he  had  been  a  trustee  of  Beloit  College. 
Dr.  Savage  was  a  corporate  member  of  the  American  Board 
of  Commissioners  for  Foreign  Missions.  He  was  one  of 
the  founders  of  the  New  West  Education  Commission, 
which  did  such  excellent  work  through  its  schools  among 
the  Mormons,  and  a  faithful  supporter  of  it  until  it  was 
absorbed  by  the  Education  Society  of  Boston.    In  1868,  he 


4  YALE  COLLEGE 

became  an  associate  editor  of  the  Congregational  Reviezv, 
which,  after  the  great  fire  of  1871,  was  merged  with  the 
New  Englander.  During  the  Civil  War,  he  was  made  a 
member  of  the  Sanitary  Commission,  and  served  as  an 
unofficial  chaplain. 

Dr.  Savage  died  at  his  home  in  Chicago,  August  6,  19 15, 
after  a  gradual  failure  of  strength,  due  to  old  age.  He  was 
buried  in  Graceland  Cemetery  in  that  city. 

His  first  marriage  took  place  in  Cromwell,  September  28, 
1847,  to  Elizabeth  Prudden.  She  died  in  March,  1886,  and 
on  February  7,  1888,  he  was  married  in  Chicago  to  Mrs. 
Margaret  Gordon  (Russell)  Hyde,  daughter  of  Andrew 
and  Margaret  (Gordon)  Russell  and  widow  of  Rev. 
James  Thomas  Hyde,  D.D.  (B.A.  1847).  She  survives 
him.    Dr.  Savage  had  no  children. 


John  Edmands,  B.A.   1847 

Born  February  i,  1820,  in  Framingham,  Mass. 
Died  October  18,  1915,  in  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

John  Edmands  was  the  son  of  Jonathan  Edmands,  a 
farmer,  and  Lucy  (Nourse)  Edmands  and  a  direct  descend- 
ant of  Walter  Edmands,  who  came  from  England  to  Con- 
cord, Mass.,  in  1639.  H^  was  born  February  i,  1820,  in 
Framingham,  Mass.,  where  his  ancestors  had  settled  in  1748, 
and  received  his  preparatory  training  at  Phillips  Academy, 
Andover.  Before  entering  Yale  in  1843,  he  was  for  a  time 
employed  as  a  carpenter.  He  had  charge  of  the  Brothers 
in  Unity  library  in  Senior  year,  was  graduated  with  Phi 
Beta  Kappa  rank,  and  spoke  at  Commencement. 

From  graduation  until  1856,  with  the  exception  of  the 
year  1848-49,  which  he  spent  as  teacher  of  English  in  the 
district  school  at  Rocky  Mount,  N.  C,  he  remained  at  Yale, 
studying  theology  and  serving  as  an  assistant  in  the  College 
Library.  In  1847,  he  published  "Subjects  for  Debate,  with 
References  to  the  Authorities."  His  home  had  been  in 
Philadelphia,  Pa.,  since  1856,  when  he  assumed  charge  of 
the  Mercantile  Library  in  that  city.  During  his  forty-five 
years  of  active  service  there,  he  acquired  a  wide  reputation 
as  a  book  expert,  and  devised  systems  of  classification  and 
a  numbering  scheme  for  libraries  which  have  been  put  in 


I 844-1 849  5 

use  all  over  the  country.  He  prepared  bibliographies  of 
"Junius"  and  "Dies  Irae,"  as  well  as  a  number  of  others, 
and  compiled  a  list  of  historical  prose  fiction  which,  at  the 
time  of  its  publication,  was  more  complete  than  any  pre- 
vious list.  Besides  contributing  extensively  to  various  publi- 
cations, including  the  Library  Journal,  he  edited  for  a 
number  of  years  the  Bulletin  of  the  Mercantile  Library. 
He  was  made  librarian  emeritus  in  1901,  but  continued  to 
visit  the  library  regularly  and  to  retain  his  interest  in  it. 
He  was  one  of  the  original  members  of  the  American 
Library  Association,  and  one  of  its  first  vice  presidents, 
and  also  served  as  head  of  the  Association  of  Pennsylvania 
Librarians  for  some  years.  In  1861,  he  aided  in  organizing 
the  Central  Congregational  Church  of  Philadelphia,  and 
had  since  been  active  in  its  work,  serving  as  its  clerk,  and 
as  a  deacon,  from  1861  to  191 5. 

Mr.  Edmands  died  at  his  home  in  Philadelphia,  October 
18,  191 5.  His  death  followed  an  illness  of  several  months' 
duration,  and  was  due  to  apoplexy.  He  was  buried  in 
Edgell  Grove  Cemetery  in  his  native  town.  Only  a  few 
weeks  before  his  last  illness,  Mr.  Edmands  completed  the 
manuscript  of  "The  Evolution  of  Congregationalism," 
which  is  soon  to  be  published.  It  is  thought  that  the  work 
entailed  in  preparing  this  at  his  advanced  age  had  much  tc 
do  with  his  severe  illness. 

He  was  married  in  Collinsville,  Conn.,  August  i,  1854, 
to  Abigail  Jane  Lloyd,  who  died  January  28,  1883.  0» 
June  17,  1889,  he  married  in  Boston,  Mass.,  Ellen  Elizabeth 
Metcalf,  whose  death  occurred  on  July  i,  1892.  His  third 
wife  was  Clarinda  Augusta,  daughter  of  Eliphalet  and 
Sarah  D.  Roberts,  to  whom  he  was  married  August  23, 
1893,  in  Philadelphia.  Mrs.  Edmands  survives  her  husband. 
He  had  no  children. 


Timothy  Dwight,  B.A.   1849 

Born  November  16,  1828,  in  Norwich,  Conn. 
Died  May  26,  1916,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 

Timothy  Dwight  was  born  November  16,  1828,  in  Nor- 
wich, Conn.,  the  son  of  James  Dwight,  whose  father,  Tim- 
othy Dwight    (B.A.    1769),   served   as   president   of   Yale 


6  YALE  COLLEGE 

College  from  1795  to  181 7.  He  was  the  grandson  of  Major 
Timothy  Dwight,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1744,  and 
Mary  (Edwards)  Dwight,  the  latter's  father  being  Rev 
Jonathan  Edwards  (B.A.  1720),  the  third  president  of 
Princeton  University.  His  mother  was  Susan,  daughter 
of  John  McLaren  Breed  (B.A.  1768),  by  his  second  wife, 
Rebecca  (Walker)  Breed,  who  was  the  daughter  of  Rob- 
ert Walker  (B.A.  1730),  a  judge  of  the  Superior  Court  of 
Connecticut. 

Timothy  Dwight  entered  Yale  in  1845,  ^"^  during  his 
undergraduate  course  received  prizes  in  mathematics  and 
Latin,  and  was  a  member  of  Phi  Beta  Kappa.  As  the  Clark 
Scholar,  he  spent  the  period  from  1849  to  185 1  in  gradu- 
ate work  at  Yale,  in  the  fall  of  the  latter  year  entering 
the  Theological  Department,  where  he  studied  for  two 
years.  He  served  as  a  tutor  in  the  College  from  185 1  to 
1855,  and  then  went  abroad  to  continue  his  studies  at  the 
Universities  of  Bonn  and  Berlin. 

Returning  to  America  in  July,  1858,  he  became  profes- 
sor of  sacred  literature  at  Yale  at  the  opening  of  the  next 
college  year.  His  work  in  the  Divinity  School  continued 
until  1886,  when  he  was  elected  president  of  Yale  College. 
Yale  had  begun  to  develop  the  departments  of  professional 
study — particularly  of  theology  and  medicine — at  the 
beginning  of  the  nineteenth  century  during  the  adminis- 
tration of  the  elder  President  Dwight,  and  the  institution, 
long  a  University  in  fact,  became  one  in  name  at  the 
inauguration  of  the  younger  Dwight.  During  the  thirteen 
years  of  his  presidency,  from  1886  to  1899,  the  University 
began  that  rapid  development  in  scope,  in  numbers  of  stu- 
dents and  faculty,  in  material  prosperity,  and  in  national 
influence  which  it  has  continued  to  so  remarkable  a  degree 
to  the  present  day. 

Dr.  Dwight  was  licensed  to  preach  May  22,  1855,  and 
ordained  to  the  ministry  of  the  Congregational  Church  six 
years  later.  In  1869,  Chicago  Theological  Seminary  con- 
ferred the  honorary  degree  of  Doctor  of  Divinity  upon 
him,  and .  Yale  honored  him  with  a  similar  degree  in 
1886.  He  also  received  the  degree  of  LL.D.  from  Harvard 
in  1886  and  from  Princeton  in  1888.  He  was  an  associate 
member  of  the  American  Academy  of  Arts  and  Sciences 
and  an  honorary  member  of  the  Society  of  the  Cincinnati. 
Dr.  Dwight  was  a  member  of  the  American  committee  for 


I 

I 


1849  7 

the  revision  of  the  English  version  of  the  Bible,  and  for  a 
number  of  years  he  was  one  of  the  editors  of  the  New 
Englander.  He  had  contributed  extensively  to  various 
publications  on  theological  and  educational  subjects.  In 
1886,  he  translated  and  edited,  with  additional  notes, 
Godet's  "Commentary  on  the  Gospel  of  John,"  and  he 
had  also  edited  several  of  Meyer's  commentaries,  includ- 
ing those  on  Romans,  on  several  other  PauHne  Epistles, 
on  Hebrews,  and  on  the  Epistles  of  James,  Peter,  John,  and 
Jude.  He  was  the  author  of  "Thoughts  of  and  for  the 
Inner  Life"  (1899),  and  in  1903  published  "Memories 
of  Yale  Life  and  Men."  He  served  as  Secretary  of  the 
Class  of  1849  continuously  from  graduation  until  his  death, 
which  occurred,  without  warning,  at  his  home  in  New 
Haven,  May  26,  1916,  as  the  result  of  infirmities  incident 
to  his  advanced  age.  Burial  was  in  Grove  Street  Ceme- 
tery, New  Haven. 

He  was  married  in  that  city,  December  31,  1866,  to  Jane 
Wakeman,  daughter  of  Roger  Sherman  Skinner,  who 
graduated  from  the  College  in  1813,  and  Mary  Lockwood 
(DeForest)  Skinner.  She  survives  him  with  thbir  son, 
Winthrop  Edwards  (B.A.  1893,  Ph.D.  1895,  LL.B.  1896). 
Their  daughter,  Helen  Rood,  died  October  16,  1909.  John 
Breed  Dwight,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1840,  and 
James  McLaren  Breed  Dwight  (B.A.  1846,  LL.B.  Colum- 
bia 1861)  were  brothers  of  Dr.  Dwight.  He  was  a  cousin 
of  Theodore  Dwight  Woolsey  (B.A.  1820),  for  twenty-five 
years  president  of  Yale. 


Edward  Dafydd  Morris,  B.A.   1849 

Born  October  31,  1825,  in  Utica,  N,  Y, 
Died  November  21,  1915,  in  Columbus,  Ohio 

Edward  Dafydd  Morris,  son  of  David  Edward  and  Ann 
(Lewis)  Morris,  was  born  October  31,  1825,  in  Utica,  N.  Y. 
He  was  of  pure  Welsh  stock,  his  father  having  come  from 
Wales  in  181 5.     The  Lewises  came  a  generation  earlier. 

His  preparatory  training  was  received  partly  at  Whites- 
town  Seminary,  near  Utica,  and  partly  by  his  own  work  at 
home.  He  was  admitted  to  the  Sophomore  Class  at  Yale  in 
1846.     He  served  as  president  of  Brothers  in  Unity,  and 


8  YALE   COLLEGE 

was  an  editor  of  the  Yale  Literary  Magazine  and  a  member 
of  Phi  Beta  Kappa.  During  his  Senior  year,  he  made 
speeches  in  the  towns  about  New  Haven  for  the  Free  Soil 
Party. 

After  taking  his  degree,  he  entered  Auburn  Theological 
Seminary,  was  graduated  there  in  1852,  his  ordination 
occurring  soon  afterwards,  and  during  the  next  three 
years  he  held  the  pastorate  of  the  Second  Presbyterian 
Church  of  Auburn.  From  1855  until  1867,  he  served  as 
pastor  of  the  Second  Presbyterian  Church  of  Columbus, 
Ohio.  During  his  residence  in  that  city,  he  was  appointed 
a  trustee  of  Western  Reserve  University,  and  also  of  Lane 
Theological  Seminary  of  Cincinnati.  In  January,  1868,  he 
was  made  professor  of  ecclesiastical  history  and  church 
polity,  and  later  professor  of  theology,  in  the  latter  institu- 
tion, where  he  remained  for  the  next  thirty  years.  When  he 
retired,  in  1898,  he  returned  to  his  earlier  home  in  Colum- 
bus, and,  while  his  strength  lasted,  continued  his  writing. 
He  was  at  all  times  interested  in  the  affairs  of  the  Presby- 
terian Church,  and  was  often  a  delegate  to  Synods  and 
General  Assemblies,  serving  on  many  committees,  and  in 
1875  holding  the  office  of  moderator.  He  was  several  times 
an  American  delegate  to  the  Pan-Presbyterian  Council,  and 
was  influential  in  arranging  the  terms  of  union  of  the  Old 
School  and  New  School  branches  of  the  Church  and  in 
securing  the  admission  of  the  Cumberland  Presbyterian 
Church  to  the  general  body.  He  wrote  much  for  religious 
papers,  especially  for  the  Evangelist  and  the  Independent, 
and  published  several  volumes  on  ecclesiastical  and  theo- 
logical subjects,  the  most  important  being  on  the  Theology 
of  the  Westminster  Symbols.  He  received  the  degree  of 
D.D.  from  Hamilton  College  in  1863  and  in  1885  that  of 
LL.D.  from  Maryville.  He  had  made  several  trips  to 
Europe. 

Dr.  Morris  died  at  his  home  in  Columbus,  November  21, 
191 5,  after  an  illness  of  some  weeks  due  to  the  infirmities 
of  age.    Burial  was  in  Columbus. 

He  was  married  on  July  29,  1852,  in  Fair  Haven,  Conn., 
to  Frances  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  Dan  and  Frances  (Rowe) 
Parmelee  of  Fair  Haven,  who  died  February  3,  1866. 
They  had  four  children:  Edward  Parmelee,  a  gradu- 
ate of  Yale  in  the  College  Class  of  1874,  who  received  the 
honorary  degrees  of  M.A.  and  L.H.D.  from  Williams  in 


1849-1850  9 

1885  and  1904,  respectively,  and  that  of  Litt.D.  from  Har- 
vard in  1909;  a  child  who  died  in  infancy;  David  Ellis 
(B.A.  Cornell  1879),  and  Henry  Nelson,  who  graduated 
from  Western  Reserve  with  the  degree  of  B.A.  in  1882. 
On  March  26,  1867,  Dr.  Morris  was  married  in  Tallmadge, 
Ohio,  to  Mary  Bryan,  daughter  of  Calvin  Treat.  Her  death 
occurred  April  28,  1893.  Two  children  were  born  to  them : 
Elizabeth  Parmelee  and  Woodbury  Treat  (B.A.  Williams 
1892). 


Benjamin  Jason  Horton,  B.A.   1850 

Born  February  13,  1831,  in  New  York  City 
Died  January  14,  1916,  in  Lawrence,  Kans. 

Benjamin  Jason  Horton,  son  of  Nicholas  Townsend  Hor- 
ton, a  manufacturer  of  grates  and  mantels,  and  Sarah  (Van- 
Orden)  Horton,  was  born  in  New  York  City,  February  13, 
183 1.  He  was  descended  from  Barnabas  Horton,  who  came 
to  Long  Island  from  England  on  the  Swallow  in  1635.  His 
boyhood  was  spent  in  Cincinnati,  Ohio,  to  which  place  his 
family  had  moved  soon  after  his  birth,  and  he  was  prepared 
for  college  at  the  Woodward  High  School  in  that  city. 
Before  joining  the  Class  of  1850  at  Yale  as  a  Sophomore, 
he  attended  for  several  years  the  Baptist  Theological  Semi- 
nary at  Covington,  Ky. 

He  was  graduated  from  Yale  with  Phi  Beta  Kappa  rank, 
and  the  next  year  taught  at  a  private  school  at  Pass  Chris- 
tian, Miss.  After  completing  the  course  in  the  Cincinnati 
Law  School,  he  studied  law  for  a  year  and  a  half  in  the 
office  of  Mr.  Timothy  Walker  in  Cincinnati.  His  final  prep- 
aration for  the  law  was  received  at  the  Harvard  Law 
School,  where  he  spent  a  few  months  in  the  autumn  of  1853. 
Soon  after  his  admission  to  the  bar  in  January,  1854,  he 
formed  a  partnership  with  Mr.  Ebenezer  Newton  in  Cin- 
cinnati, which  continued  for  about  two  years.  In  1862,  he 
entered  the  army  as  first  lieutenant  of  the  Twenty-fourth 
Regiment,  Ohio  Volunteer  Infantry,  of  which  he  afterwards 
became  captain.  Being  severely  wounded  at  the  battle  of 
Stone  River,  December  31,  1862,  when  he  suffered  the  loss 
of  one  leg,  he  was  compelled  to  give  up  military  service. 
He  then  resumed  practice  independently  in  Cincinnati,  and 


lO  YALE    COLLEGE 

in  the  fall  of  1863  was  elected  clerk  of  the  Court  of  Com- 
mon Pleas  of  Hamilton  County.  Seven  years  later,  he 
removed  to  Lawrence,  Kans.,  which  had  since  been  his 
home  and  where  he  continued  in  the  practice  of  his  profes- 
sion until  his  retirement  in  1910.  During  President  Har- 
rison's term  of  office,  he  was  appointed  to  negotiate  with 
certain  Indian  tribes  for  the  settlement  of  conflicting  land 
claims.  He  had  also  held  various  offices  in  Douglas  County, 
including  those  of  register  of  deeds  and  probate  judge. 

His  death  occurred  in  Lawrence,  January  14,  1916,  after 
an  illness  of  two  weeks  due  to  congestion  of  the  kidneys. 
He  was  buried  in  Oak  Hill  Cemetery  at  Lawrence. 

Mr.  Horton  was  married  in  Cincinnati,  April  8,  1858,  to 
Sarah  Virginia,  daughter  of  Walker  Meredith  and  Eva 
(Ammen)  Yeatman,  who  survives  him.  Their  children 
were:  Walker  Yeatman,  who  died  in  1863;  Eva  Ammen; 
Alice  Yeatman;  Richard  Scott;  Thomas  Yeatman,  and 
Benjamin  Jason. 


Everett  Wade  Bedinger,  B.A.   185 1 

Born  September  8,  1830,  in  Kenton  County,  Ky. 
Died  March  6,  1916,  in  Anchorage,  Ky. 

Everett  Wade  Bedinger  was  born  in  Kenton  County, 
Kentucky,  September  8,  1830,  the  son  of  Benjamin  Franklin 
Bedinger  (M.D.  University  of  Pennsylvania  1819)  and 
Sarah  Everett  (Wade)  Bedinger.  He  was  the  great-grand- 
son of  Henry  and  Magdalena  (Schlegal)  Bedinger,  who 
came  in  1737  from  Germany  to  York  County,  Pennsylvania, 
twenty-five  years  later  settling  at  Shepherdstown,  W.  Va. 
His  grandfather,  George  Michael  Bedinger,  a  Virginian  by 
birth,  served  in  the  Revolution,  ranking  as  a  major  at  its 
close,  and  afterwards  removed  to  Kentucky,  where  he  was 
elected  to  the  State  Legislature;  he  also  served  as  a  Con- 
gressman from  1803  to  1807.  His  mother  was  the  daughter 
of  David  Everett  Wade,  who  went  from  New  Jersey  to 
Fort  Washington  (now  Cincinnati),  Ohio,  in  1788,  and  built 
one  of  the  first  houses  erected  outside  of  the  fort,  and  Mary 
(Jones)  Wade. 

Everett  Bedinger  passed  his  boyhood  in  Cincinnati,  Cov- 
ington, Ky.,  and  Richwood,  Ky.,  and  before  entering  Yale 


I850-I85I  II 

as  a  Sophomore  in  1848,  studied  in  the  preparatory  depart- 
ment of  Cincinnati  College,  at  Miami  University,  and  in  the 
school  of  B.  B.  Sayre  at  Frankfort,  Ky.  He  received  Dis- 
pute appointments  in  both  Junior  and  Senior  years  in 
college. 

On  account  of  illness,  he  was  absent  during  much  of  the 
last  year  of  his  course,  and,  after  receiving  his  degree  pri- 
vately, took  up  the  management  of  his  father's  farm  in 
Kenton  County.  Later,  he  was  successfully  engaged  in 
farming  in  Boone  County  in  the  same  state,  and  through 
his  activities  in  church  and  Sunday  school  work  at  this  time 
was  led  to  enter  the  ministry.  He  studied  at  the  Theological 
Seminary  at  Danville,  Ky.,  and  in  April,  1858,  was  elected 
a  commissioner  to  the  General  Assembly  and  licensed  to 
preach  by  the  Ebenezer  Presbytery,  his  ordination  occurring 
the  following  year.  His  first  churches  were  in  Richwood, 
Burlington,  and  Paris,  Ky.,  but  his  pastoral  duties  were 
interrupted  by  the  Civil  War,  during  which  he  preached  to 
soldiers  and  in  various  communities  as  opportunity  afforded. 
From  1865  to  1867,  Dr.  Bedinger  gave  his  time  to  reorgan- 
ization work  among  several  churches  which  had  been  left 
without  pastors  during  the  war,  and,  in  the  autumn  of  1867, 
accepted  the  charge  of  the  Presbyterian  Church  at  Shep- 
herdstown,  W.  Va.,  where  he  remained  until  early  in  1870, 
at  that  time  going  to  Boone  County,  Kentucky,  to  become 
pastor  of  the  churches  at  Florence  and  Richwood.  Eight 
years  later,  he  was  chosen  to  fill  the  pastorate  of  the 
Anchorage  (Ky.)  Presbyterian  Church,  at  the  same  time 
becoming  chaplain  and  a  teacher  in  the  Bellewood  Seminary 
and  in  the  Kentucky  Presbyterian  Normal  School.  Dr. 
Bedinger's  influence  here  was  very  strong,  and,  in  1889, 
he  was  called  upon  to  take  charge  of  the  evangelistic  work 
of  the  Synod  of  Kentucky.  He  rendered  valuable  service 
in  this  direction  until  his  death,  and  for  a  long  time  was 
treasurer  of  the  Evangelistic  Fund.  In  1883,  he  received 
the  honorary  degree  of  D.D.  from  King's  College  at  Bristol, 
Tenn. 

Dr.  Bedinger  died  at  his  home  in  Anchorage,  March  6, 
1916,  and  was  buried  in  Richwood,  Ky. 

On  June  i,  1852,  he  was  married  in  Charlestown,  Va., 
to  his  second  cousin,  Sarah  Eleanor,  daughter  of  William 
and  Virginia  (Bedinger)  Lucas  of  Jefferson  County,  Vir- 
ginia, by  whom  he  had  seven  children, — two  daughters  and 


12  YALE    COLLEGE 

five  sons.  Mrs.  Bedinger  died  July  7,  1867,  and  on  March 
16,  1869,  his  marriage  to  Anna  Moore,  daughter  of  Conrad 
BeUnger  and  Maria  VanDoren  (Voorhees)  Bilmyer  took 
place  at  Shepherdstown.  Five  daughters  and  two  sons  were 
born  to  them.  His  widow  and  twelve  of  his  children  survive 
him. 


William  Taylor  Harlow,  B.A.   185 1 

Born  October  3,  1828,  in  Shrewsbury,  Mass. 
Died  December  i,  1915,  in  Worcester,  Mass. 

William  Taylor  Harlow,  son  of  Gideon  and  Harriet 
(Howe)  Harlow,  was  born  October  3,  1828,  in  Shrews- 
bury, Mass.  His  father,  a  farmer,  was  the  son  of  Thomas 
and  Thankful  (Banister)  Harlow  and  a  descendant  of  Ser- 
geant William  Harlow,  who  came  to  this  country  from 
England  about  1630.  His  ancestry  also  included  six  May- 
flozver  pilgrims, — Richard  Warren  ;  John  Alden ;  Priscilla 
Mullens;  William  and  Alice  Mullens,  and  Governor  Wil- 
liam Bradford, — as  well  as  three  passengers  of  the  Fortune, 
and  five  of  the  Ann.  Ancestors  of  his  mother  were  among 
the  earHest  settlers  of  the  town  of  Shrewsbury.  His  four 
great-grandfathers,  and  one  grandfather,  served  in  the 
Revolutionary  War. 

He  was  prepared  for  Yale,  with  the  exception  of  a  single 
term  spent  at  Monson  Academy  in  Monson,  Mass.,  entirely 
through  his  own  efforts,  and  joined  the  Class  of  1851  at 
the  beginning  of  its  Sophomore  year.  He  received  a  second 
prize  for  excellence  in  the  mathematics  of  that  year. 

Before  completing  his  college  course,  he  had  taken  up  the 
study  of  law,  and,  in  1851,  entered  the  law  offices  of  Judge 
Benjamin  F.  Thomas  and  Dwight  Foster  (B.A.  1848)  in 
Worcester,  Mass.,  where  he  continued  his  preparation.  In 
March,  1853,  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar,  after  which  he 
opened  an  office  in  Worcester.  A  year  later,  he  removed 
to  the  town  of  Spencer,  where  he  practiced  until  August, 
1861,  when  he  entered  the  United  States  Army  as  a  first 
lieutenant  in  the  Twenty-first  Regiment,  Massachusetts 
Volunteer  Militia.  He  took  part  in  several  engagements, 
and  on  July  29,  1862,  was  promoted  to  be  captain,  later 
receiving  a  commission  as  major  of  the  Fifty-seventh  Regi- 


i85i  13 

ment,  which  he  assisted  in  recruiting.  In  1863,  he  was 
mustered  out  of  service,  being  incapacitated  by  malaria, 
contracted  in  the  field,  and  resumed  practice  in  Worcester. 
Two  years  later,  he  went  to  California  with  a  view  to  select- 
ing a  place  for  permanent  settlement,  but  in  1867  he  gave 
up  that  plan,  as  the  climate  did  not  agree  with  him,  and 
returned  to  Worcester.  His  health  did  not  permit  him  to 
engage  in  any  business  for  nearly  two  years,  but  in  the 
spring  of  1869  he  was  appointed  United  States  assessor  of 
internal  revenue  for  the  eighth  Massachusetts  district,  an 
office  which  he  held  until  its  abolishment  four  years  later. 
He  was  appointed  assistant  clerk  of  courts  of  Worcester 
County  in  1877,  and,  by  successive  reappointments,  held 
that  office  until  he  retired  at  the  age  of  seventy-five.  From 
1873  to  1878,  he  was  a  member  of  the  Worcester  School 
Board;  he  had  served  as  a  director  of  the  Free  Public 
Library,  and  was  a  member  of  the  First  Unitarian  Church 
and  a  companion  of  the  Military  Order  of  the  Loyal  Legion. 
He  had  had  a  number  of  articles  and  stories  published 
anonymously  in  magazines  and  newspapers.  While  living 
in  Spencer,  he  served  as  a  member  of  the  School  Board. 

Major  Harlow's  death  occurred  at  his  home  in  Worcester, 
December  i,  1915,  and  was  due  to  valvular  heart  disease. 
When  a  boy  of  seventeen  he  had  suffered  from  this  disease, 
but  had  not  again  been  troubled  by  it  until  three  years 
before  his  death,  when  it  returned.  He  was  not  forced  to 
give  up  all  activities,  however,  and  his  mind  was  keen  until 
the  last.  He  was  buried  in  Mountain  View  Cemetery  in  his 
native  town. 

He  was  married  in  Spencer,  Mass.,  May  28,  1863,  to 
Jeannette,  daughter  of  Lewis  and  Maria  (Stearns)  Bemis. 
Mrs.  Harlow  died  in  Worcester  on  January  11,  1901.  A 
daughter,  Margaret,  and  a  son,  Frederick  Bemis  (B.A. 
Amherst  1885),  survive.  A  third  child,  Gideon,  died  in 
infancy.  Mrs.  Harlow's  brother,  Frederick  A.  Bemis, 
entered  Yale,  and  studied  one  year  with  the  Class  of  1855; 
he  was  killed  at  the  battle  of  Chantilly,  September  i,  1862. 


14  YALE   COLLEGE 


David  Perry  Temple,  B.A.   185 1 

Born  June  30,  1825,  in  Framingham,  Mass. 
Died  February  11,  1916,  in  Chittenango,  N.  Y. 

David  Perry  Temple,  son  of  John  Temple,  a  farmer,  who 
served  as  captain  of  an  artillery  company  in  the  War  of 
1812,  was  born  in  Framingham,  Mass.,  June  30,  1825.  His 
father  was  the  son  of  Josiah  Temple,  who  was  wounded 
during  the  battle  of  Lexington,  April  19,  1775,  and  Eliza- 
beth (Pitts)  Temple  and  a  descendant  of  Robert  Temple, 
who  settled  at  Saco,  Maine,  and  was  killed  by  Indians  in 
1676.  His  mother  was  Abigail,  daughter  of  Elisha  Johnson 
of  Southboro,  Mass. 

He  received  his  early  education  at  the  Framingham  Acad- 
emy, and  was  graduated  from  Yale  in  1851.  For  several 
years  after  taking  his  degree,  Mr.  Temple  taught  in  New 
York  City,  Wilton,  Conn.,  and  Portland,  Maine.  In  1859, 
he  went  to  Minnesota,  becoming  one  of  the  earliest  settlers 
in  Houston  County,  where  he  engaged  in  farming.  He 
served  as  superintendent  of  the  schools  of  that  county  from 
1 86 1  to  1870,  and  was  also  elected  county  commissioner  in 
1861.  He  became  a  member  of  the  Minnesota  State  Senate 
in  1866,  and  served  one  term.  He  was  chairman  of  the 
Senate  Committee  on  Education,  and  assisted  materially  in 
changing  the  old-fashioned  methods  of  managing  schools 
to  more  modern  ones.  In  1874,  he  removed  to  York,  Nebr., 
where  he  entered  the  lumber  business.  He  was  deputy 
county  treasurer  for  a  number  of  years,  and  also  held  the 
office  of  councilman  for  the  second  ward.  He  went  to 
Meriden,  Iowa,  in  1884,  and  was  there  president  of  the 
Board  of  Education.  He  was  in  the  lumber  business  there 
also.  In  1889,  he  removed  to  Colorado  Springs,  Colo.,  and 
thence  to  Provo  City,  Utah,  living  in  the  latter  place  for  a 
few  years.  Wherever  he  went,  he  was  active  in  the  Presby- 
terian Church,  of  which  he  was  an  ordained  elder. 

Since  1894,  his  home  had  been  at  Chittenango,  N.  Y., 
where  he  had  been  too  feeble  to  engage  in  any  business,  but 
kept  up  his  interest  in  his  church  and  current  events  to  the 
last,  and  was  an  entertaining  conversationalist.  He  was  ill 
only  two  weeks,  his  death  occurring  at  Chittenango,  Feb- 
ruary II,  1916,  as  the  result  of  senility.  Buriaf  was  in 
Edgell  Grove  Cemetery  in  his  native  town. 


1851-1853  15 

He  was  married  April  3,  1877,  in  Lansing,  Iowa,  to 
Eleanor,  daughter  of  Edwin  and  Polly  (Abbott)  Hazeltine, 
who  died  on  October  10,  1886.  They  had  two  children: 
Ruth,  whose  death  occurred  August  22,  1879,  and  Helen 
Julia  (Mrs.  Clarence  A.  Waterbury  of  Chittenango) ,  who 
survives. 


Lynde  Alexander  Catlin,  B.A.   1853 

Born  October  31,  1833,  in  New  York  City 
Died  October  23,  191 5,  in  South  Woodstock,  Conn. 

Lynde  Alexander  Catlin,  who  was  born  in  New  York 
City,  October  31,  1833,  was  the  son  of  Charles  Taylor  Cat- 
lin (B.A.  1822,  M.A.  Columbia  1828),  whose  parents  were 
Lynde  Catlin,  a  graduate  of  Yale  in  1786,  and  Helen  Mar- 
garet (Kip)  Catlin.  His  mother  was  Lucy  Ann,  daughter 
of  Elias  Hasket  Derby,  2d,  and  Lucy  (Brown)  Derby. 
Receiving  his  preparatory  training  in  Brooklyn  and  at  a 
school  in  Port  Jervis,  N.  J.,  he  entered  Yale  with  the  Class 
of  1853. 

In  the  spring  of  1854,  he  became  connected  with  the 
Illinois  Central  Railroad  Company,  and  continued  with 
them  for  many  years,  at  first  holding  the  position  of  clerk, 
later  that  of  cashier,  and  finally  that  of  secretary  of  the 
company.  His  home  was  in  Brooklyn  from  1845  to  1884, 
and  he  served  for  a  long  time  as  treasurer  of  the  Church  of 
the  Incarnation  (Protestant  Episcopal)  in  that  place.  Since 
his  retirement  from  business  in  1884,  he  had  lived  in  South 
Woodstock,  Conn.,  engaged  in  farming.  During  the  period 
from  1890  ta  1902,  he  served  as  judge  of  probate  for  the 
town,  and  he  had  also  been  a  trustee  and  vice  president  of 
the  Day-Kimball  Hospital  and  a  trustee  of  Woodstock 
Academy  and  the  Putnam  Savings  Bank.  He  had  for  a 
number  of  years  attended  St.  Philip's  Church  in  Putnam, 
Conn.,  and  had  been  one  of  its  wardens.  He  had  made 
several  trips  to  Europe.  For  some  years,  he  served  as 
Assistant  Secretary  of  the  Class  of  1853. 

His  death,  which  was  due  to  apoplexy,  occurred  at  his 
home  in  South  Woodstock,  October  23,  191=^.  Burial  was 
in  the  family  plot  in  Greenwood  Cemetery,  Brooklyn. 


1 6  YALE  COLLEGE 

Mr.  Catlin  was  unmarried.  He  was  a  brother  of  Charles 
Taylor  Catlin,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1856,  Hasket 
Derby  Catlin  (B.A.  1859),  and  of  Arnold  Welles  Catlin, 
who  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  at  Yale  in  1862  and  that 
of  M.D.  from  the  University  of  Pennsylvania  three  years 
later.  His  uncle,  John  Mortimer  Catlin,  graduated  from 
the  College  in  1820,  and  several  other  relatives  have 
attended  Yale,  including  his  nephews,  Rt.  Rev.  Sidney 
Catlin  Partridge  (B.A.  1880)  and  Reginald  W.  Catlin 
(B.A.  1908). 


George  Washburn  Smalley,  B.A.   1853 

Born  June  4,  1833,  in  Franklin,  Mass. 
Died  April  4,  1916,  in  London,  England 

George  Washburn  Smalley,  son  of  Rev.  Elam  Smalley 
and  Louisa  Jane  (Washburn)  Smalley,  was  born  June  4, 
1833,  in  Franklin,  Mass.  His  early  education  was  received 
in  Worcester,  Mass.,  to  which  place  his  family  had  removed 
in  his  childhood,  and  in  1849  he  entered  Yale,  being  gradu- 
ated four  years  later.  In  Freshman  year,  a  first  prize  for 
excellence  in  the  translation  of  Latin  into  English  was 
awarded  to  him. 

On  leaving  college,  he  took  up  the  study  of  law  in  the, 
office  of  George  F.  Hoar  (B.A.  Harvard  1846,  LL.B.  Har- 
vard 1849,  LL.D.  Yale  1885)  in  Worcester,  continuing 
his  work  in  1854-55  at  the  Harvard  Law  School,  and  dur- 
ing the  next  year  in  Boston.  In  September,  1856,  he  was 
admitted  to  the  bar,  and  became  associated  in  practice  with 
his  uncle,  W.  R.  P.  Washburn,  their  offices  being  in  Bos- 
ton. Just  before  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  War,  Mr. 
Smalley  went  South  for  his  health.  His  connection  with 
the  New  York  Tribune,  which  continued  for  many  years, 
was  begun  at  this  time,  when  he  wrote  a  series  of  letters 
on  the  Negro  question.  During  the  first  year  of  the  war, 
he  was  at  the  front  as  a  correspondent  for  The  Tribune. 
In  October,  1862,  he  returned  to  New  York  as  a  member 
of  its  editorial  staff.  He  went  to  Europe  in  1866,  and 
wrote  his  impressions  on  the  Austro-Prussian  War,  and 
the  next  year  was  sent  by  his  paper  to  London  as  foreign 
correspondent.    The  London  correspondent  was  at  that  time 


1853-1854  17 

a  comparatively  unknown  factor  in  the  making  of  an 
American  newspaper,  and  Mr.  Smalley's  advent  was  speed- 
ily followed  by  a  radical  change  in  the  news-collecting 
methods  of  both  the  American  and  English  press.  As  a 
war  correspondent  in  the  Franco-Prussian  War,  he  prac- 
tically established  the  use  of  the  telegraph  in  sending  news- 
paper accounts  of  battles.  His  journalistic  duties,  in  the 
field  of  politics,  art,  literature,  and  the  drama,  kept  him 
closely  in  touch  with  persons  of  note,  and  his  letters  in 
The  Tribune,  published  over  his  initials,  attracted  wide- 
spread attention.  In  1895,  he  returned  to  this  country,  and 
for  eleven  years  served  as  the  American  correspondent  of 
the  London  Times.  Since  his  retirement  from  active 
journalism  in  1906,  he  had  lived  in  London,  where  he  died 
April  4,  1916. 

In  1868,  Mr.  Smalley  compiled  the  speeches  of  John 
Bright,  but  made  no  other  literary  attempts  aside  from  his 
regular  work  until  1890,  when  he  published  "London  Let- 
ters." Five  years  later,  his  book,  ''Studies  of  Men," 
appeared,  and  was  followed  in  1909  by  "The  Life  of  Sir 
Sidney  Waterlow,  Bart."  He  was  also  the  author  of 
"Anglo-American  Memories,"  one  volume  of  which  was 
published  in  191 1,  and  the  other  in  1912.  He  was  the 
United  States  commissioner  at  the  Paris  Exposition  of 
1878. 

Mr.  Smalley  was  married  December  25,  1862,  to  Phoebe 
Garnaut,  an  adopted  daughter  of  Wendell  Phillips  (B.A. 
Harvard  183 1,  LL.B.  Harvard  1834),  the  noted  abolition- 
ist. They  had  five  children :  Eleanor ;  Phillips,  who  studied 
law  at  Harvard  from  1887  to  1889;  Evelyn;  Ida,  and 
Emerson. 


William  Henry  Fenii,  B.A.   1854 

Born  March  i,  1834,  in  Charleston,  S.  C 
Died  March  11,  1916,  in  Daytona,  Fla. 

William  Henry  Fenn,  son  of  Joel  William  Fenn,  whose 
parents  were  William  and  Mary  (Hurlbut)  Fenn,  was  born 
March  i,  1834,  in  Charleston,  S.  C  The  founder  of  the 
Fenn  family  in  this  country  was  Benjamin  Fenn,  who  came 
from  England  in  1630,  settling  at  Dorchester,  Mass.     His 


l8  YALE  COLLEGE 

mother  was  Mary  Burden,  daughter  of  Thomas  and  Ann 
EHza  (Berwick)  Legare  and  a  descendant  of  Solomon 
Legare,  who  emigrated  to  America  from  New  Rochelle, 
France,  in  1696.  John  Berwick  Legare  (B.A.  181 5)  was 
her  eldest  brother,  and  she  was  a  cousin  of  John  Bassnett 
Legare,  also  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  18 15. 

William  Fenn's  preparatory  training  was  received  at 
Phillips  (Andover)  Academy,  and  in  his  Sophomore  and 
Junior  years  at  Yale  he  held  the  scholarship  founded  in 
1846.  The  next  year,  the  Clark  Scholarship  was  awarded 
to  him;  he  was  the  recipient  of  several  prizes  in  English 
and  Latin  composition,  and,  in  Senior  year,  of  the  DeForest 
medal,  and  was  elected  to  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 

In  the  fall  following  his  graduation,  after  three  months 
spent  in  travel,  he  returned  to  Phillips  Academy,  and  for 
a  year  taught  Latin  and  Greek  there.  He  was  then  engaged 
in  teaching  in  New  York  City  until  1856,  when  he  entered 
Andover  Theological  Seminary.  Graduating  from  that 
institution  two  years  later,  he  was  ordained  to  the  Congre- 
gational ministry  February  10,  1859,  and  spent  the  next 
seven  years  as  pastor  of  the  Franklin  Street  Church  of 
Manchester,  N.  H.  He  was  called  to  the  High  Street  Con- 
gregational Church  of  Portland,  Maine,  in  1866,  and  taking 
up  his  work  early  in  the  summer,  spent  the  rest  of  his  active 
ministry  there,  although  he  received  calls  to  several  other 
churches.  Being  made  pastor  emeritus  in  1904,  he  con- 
tinued to  live  in  Portland  and  to  take  an  active  part  in  the 
life  of  the  city  as  long  as  his  health  permitted.  Dr.  Fenn 
was  a  corporator  and  for  many  years  a  member  of  the 
executive  board  of  the  American  Board  of  Commissioners 
for  Foreign  Missions.  In  1890,  he  was  made  a  trustee  of 
Bangor  Theological  Seminary,  and  served  in  that  capacity 
until  his  death.  In  1874,  Yale  conferred  the  honorary 
degree  of  D.D.  upon  him.  He  was  one  of  the  most  active 
members  of  the  Portland  Benevolent  Society.  He  had 
traveled  abroad  extensively. 

For  a  long  time,  he  had  been  in  the  habit  of  spending  the 
winter  in  the  South,  having  a  house  at  Daytona,  Fla.,  where 
he  died  March  11,  1916,  after  a  Hngering  illness  due  to 
paralysis.  His  body  was  taken  to  Portland  for  burial  in 
Evergreen  Cemetery. 

His  marriage  took  place  on  April  10,  1862,  in  New  York 
City  to  Hannah  Thornton,  daughter  of  John  A.  and  Nancy 


1854-1856  19 

Goffe  McGaw  of  Bedford,  N.  H.  They  had  no  children. 
Mrs.  Fenn's  death  occurred  December  15,  191 5.  Dr.  Fenn's 
nephew,  Charles  W.  Fenn,  graduated  from  the  Scientific 
School  in  1875;  he  died  in  May,  1916,  and  a  sketch  of  his 
life  is  given  on  another  page  of  this  volume. 


James  Otis  Denniston,  B.A.   1856 

Born  December  14,  1835,  in  Washingtonville,  N.  Y. 
Died  November  12,  1915,  in  New  York  City 

James  Otis  Denniston,  one  of  the  eleven  children  of 
Robert  and  Mary  (Scott)  Denniston,  was  born  December 
14,  1835,  in  Washingtonville,  N.  Y.,  which  had  long  been 
the  family  home.  His  father,  a  graduate  of  Union  College 
in  1820,  was  prominent  in  politics  in  New  York  .State,  and 
had  served  in  both  the  Senate  and  Assembly,  and  as  state 
comptroller.  His  mother's  parents  were  William  and  Mary 
(Mather)  Scott.  The  son  received  his  preparatory  train- 
ing at  his  home,  and  was  graduated  from  Yale  in  1856, 
receiving  a  Dispute  appointment  at  Commencement. 

After  leaving  college,  he  studied  law  in  the  office  of  the 
late  Eugene  A.  Brewster  of  Newburgh,  N.  Y.,  and,  being 
admitted  to  the  bar  in  1858,  practiced  for  the  next  three 
years  in  New  York  City,  where  for  a  time  he  was  in  the 
office  of  Brown,  Hall  &  Vanderpoel.  In  1861,  he  decided 
to  give  up  the  law  and  study  for  the  ministry,  and  in  the 
fall  of  that  year  entered  Union  Theological  Seminary  in 
New  York  City.  In  the  summer  of  1862,  while  at  home,  he 
assisted  in  organizing  Company  G  of  the  One  Hundred 
and  Twenty-fourth  New  York  Volunteers,  and  in  Septem- 
ber accompanied  it  to  the  front  as  first  lieutenant.  He  was 
wounded  at  Gettysburg,  and  a  few  months  later  resigned, 
holding  at  the  time  a  captain's  commission.  Upon  his  return 
to  New  York,  he  resumed  his  studies  at  Union  Seminary^ 
where,  with  the  exception  of  a  few  months  in  1864  spent 
in  the  service  of  the  Sanitary  Commission,  he  continued 
until  his  graduation  in  1865.  During  the  summer  of  that 
year,  he  supplied  a  pulpit  at  Ludlow,  Vt.,  after  which  he 
spent  a  year  abroad  in  study  at  Berlin,  Dresden,  and  Halle. 
In  the  succeeding  years,  he  served  as  pastor  of  Presbyterian 
churches  at   Fishkill,   N.   Y.,   Matawan,   N.   J.,   Erie,   Pa., 


20  YALE    COLLEGE 

Kingston,  N.  Y.,  and  at  Wappinger's  Falls,  N.  Y.  Owing 
to  ill  health,  he  spent  the  two  years  from  1883  to  1885  at 
Newburgh  without  pastoral  charge,  but  in  1885  he  was  able 
to  accept  a  call  to  the  Cooperstown  (N.  Y.)  Presbyterian 
Church,  where  he  preached  for  eleven  years.  His  next 
church  was  at  State  College,  Pa.,  and  he  remained  there 
until  his  retirement  from  the  active  ministry  in  1906.  Since 
then,  Mr.  Denniston  had  spent  much  of  his  time  in  New 
York  City,  and  his  death  occurred  in  that  city,  November 
12,  1915,  after  an  illness  of  only  a  few  hours  resulting  from 
cerebral  hemorrhage.  His  body  was  taken  to  Washington- 
ville  for  burial. 

Mr.  Denniston  was  a  life  member  and  a  director  of  the 
American  Bible  Society.  He  was  married  in  Fishkill,  N.  Y., 
June  3,  1869,  to  Margaret  C,  daughter  of  Epenetus  and 
Margaret  (Walsh)  Crosby,  who  died  less  than  two  months 
before  her  husband.  Their  only  child,  Mary,  survives. 
Two  of  Mr.  Denniston's  brothers — William  Scott  and 
Henry  Martyn — received  the  degree  of  B.A.  from  Yale, 
being  members  of  the  Classes  of  1853  and  1862,  respec- 
tively. The  former  graduated  from  the  College  of  Physi- 
cians and  Surgeons  in  1856,  and  died  six  years  later,  of 
typhoid  fever,  contracted  as  a  volunteer  surgeon  in  the 
Army  of  the  Potomac.  The  latter  entered  the  pay  corps 
of  the  United  States  Army,  and  was  retired  with  the  rank 
of  rear  admiral,  for  w^ar  service,  on  reaching  the  age  of 
sixty-two;  in  1892,  Yale  gave  him  an  honorary  M.A.  Mr. 
Denniston  was  a  cousin,  in  the  fourth  generation,  of  John 
Denniston,  who  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  at  Yale  in 
1807. 

Jeptha  Garrard,  B.A.   1858 

Born  April  21,  1836,  in  Cincinnati,  Ohio 
Died  December  16,  191 5,  in  Cincinnati,  Ohio 

Jeptha  Garrard  was  born  April  21,  1836,  in  Cincinnati, 
Ohio,  his  parents  being  Jeptha  Dudley  Garrard,  a  lawyer, 
who  graduated  from  Transylvania  University  in  1821,  and 
Sarah  Bella  (Ludlow)  Garrard.  He  received  his  prepara- 
tion for  college  in  Northampton,  Mass.,  at  the  school  con- 
ducted by  Lewis  J.  Dudley  (B.A.  1838,  LL.B.  1847).  In 
Sophomore  year  at  college,  he  was  awarded  a  first  prize  in 


1856-I858  21 

declamation  and  a  third  prize  in  English  composition,  and 
he  also  received  several  prizes  in  the  debates  of  Linonia, 
of  which  he  was  president  in  his  Senior  year. 

After  graduating  from  Yale,  he  studied  for  a  year  in 
the  Cincinnati  Law  School,  taking  the  degree  of  LL.B. 
there  in  1859.  He  immediately  entered  upon  the  practice 
of  his  profession  in  Cincinnati.  About  1880,  he  began  to 
devote  most  of  his  attention  to  patent  cases,  and  he  con- 
tinued to  specialize  in  that  direction  for  several  years. 

In  September,  1861,  he  was  appointed  captain  of  the 
Sixth  Independent  Company  of  Ohio  Cavalry,  which 
became  Company  L,  Third  New  York  Cavalry,  of  which, 
in  the  fall  of  the  following  year,  he  was  made  major.  He 
served  from  December,  1863,  until  his  withdrawal  from  the 
Service,  April  25,  1865,  as  colonel  of  the  First  United  States 
Colored  Cavalry.  He  was  appointed  brevet  brigadier  gen- 
eral in  March,  1865.  He  served  as  president  of  the  Cin- 
cinnati Board  of  Park  Commissioners  from  March,  1891, 
to  October,  1893.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Military  Order 
of  the  Loyal  Legion,  of  the  Sons  of  the  Revolution,  and  of 
Central  Christian  Church  of  Cincinnati. 

His  death  occurred  suddenly  in  that  city,  December  16, 
191 5,  as  the  result  of  an  attack  of  angina  pectoris.  He  was 
buried  in  Spring  Grove  Cemetery. 

On  October  4,  1864,  he  was  married  in  Auburn,  N.  Y., 
to  Anna,  daughter  of  Jehu  and  Louisa  J.  (Vanderheyden) 
Knapp.  Mrs.  Garrard  died  May  19,  1887.  They  had  no 
children. 


Edward  Dromgoole  Grant,  B.A.   1858 

Born  February  12,  1836,  in  Brunswick  County,  Va. 
Died  November  19,  1915,  in  Farmington,  Conn. 

Edward  Dromgoole  Grant,  whose  parents  were  James 
Harris  and  Rebecca  Walton  (Sims)  Grant,  was  born  Feb- 
ruary 12,  1836,  in  Brunswick  County,  Virginia.  Entering 
Yale  from  Phillips  Academy,  Exeter,  N.  H.,  in  1853,  he 
remained  as  a  member  of  the  Class  of  1857  until  November, 
1854,  when  he  left  college.  He  joined  the  Class  with  which 
he  was  graduated  at  the  beginning  of  its  Sophomore  year. 
He  belonged  to  Linonia,  and  received  a  Colloquy  appoint- 
ment Junior  year. 


2  2  YALE    COLLEGE 

He  began  the  study  of  law  in  Chicago  after  his  gradua- 
tion, and,  having  been  admitted  to  the  bar  in  November, 
i860,  practiced  there  for  about  a  year.  In  1861,  he  went  to 
Michigan,  and  bought  a  farm  about  five  miles  from  Grand 
Rapids,  where  he  was  located  until  December,  1865.  From 
June,  1866,  until  the  autumn  of  1871,  he  lived  at  Spencer- 
port,  N.  Y.,  engaged  in  farming.  The  next  two  years  were 
spent  in  the  nursery  business  in  Topeka,  Kans.,  after  which 
he  was  for  some  time  in  the  employ  of  Mr.  William  A. 
Heermance,  a  produce  commission  dealer,  in  New  York 
City.  In  May,  1876,  he  became  a  member  of  the  real  estate 
firm  of  S.  B.  Goodale  &  Company  in  that  city,  continuing 
that  connection  until  his  retirement  seventeen  years  later. 

For  a  time  thereafter,  he  lived  in  Margaretville,  N.  Y., 
but  since  1904  he  had  made  his  home  at  Farmington,  Conn., 
where  he  died  on  November  19,  191 5.  His  health  had  been 
poor  for  a  long  time.  Mr.  Grant  belonged  to  the  Congrega- 
tional Church. 

His  marriage  took  place  in  New  Haven,  Conn.,  March 
24,  1863,  to  Jennie  Eliza,  daughter  of  Addison  and  Ann 
(Hogeboom)  Porter  and  sister  of  John  Addison  Porter 
(B.A.  1842,  M.D.  1855),  who  survives  him  without  chil- 
dren. Mr.  Grant's  two  ne])hews,  the  late  John  Addison 
Porter  and  Edgar  Sheffield  Porter,  both  attended  Yale,  the 
former  taking  the  degree  of  B.A.  in  1878,  and  the  latter 
being  a  non-graduate  member  of  the  Class  of  1880  in 
the  Scientific  School. 


Horace  Neide,  B.A.   1858 

Born  December  21,  1837,  in  Covcntryville,  Pa. 
Died  December  3,  1915,  in  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

Horace  Neide  was  born  in  Covcntryville,  Pa.,  December 
21,  1837,  the  son  of  Joseph  Neide,  a  graduate  of  Dickinson 
College.  His  mother  was  Rebecca,  daughter  of  Samuel  and 
Martha  (Ball)  Shafer  of  Covcntryville.  He  spent  his  early 
life  at  Pottstown,  Pa.,  starting  his  schooling  at  The  Hill 
School,  and  later  studied  at  the  Bolmer  School  in  West 
Chester.  He  then  went  to  Williston  Seminary,  Easthamp- 
ton,  Mass.,  where  he  finished  his  preparation  for  Yale. 


1858  23 

Beginning  the  study  of  law  at  Yale  in  the  fall  of  1858,  he 
continued  it  with  Mr.  Peter  McCall  in  Philadelphia,  At  the 
outbreak  of  the  Civil  War,  he  enlisted,  being  chosen  second 
lieutenant  of  the  Pennsylvania  Reserve  Infantry  in  May, 

1861.  The  following  December,  he  was  made  first  lieuten- 
ant ;  a  few  months  later,  was  promoted  to  be  captain,  and  in 
August,  1862,  became  major.    He  resigned  on  November  24, 

1862,  but  in  June  of  the  following  year  reentered  the  Serv- 
ice as  captain  in  the  Veteran  Reserve  Corps.  He  was  pro- 
moted to  be  major  December  4,  1863,  and  lieutenant  colonel 
in  June,  1864,  and  when  he  was  mustered  out  of  volunteer 
service  in  June,  1867,  ranked  as  a  brevet  brigadier  general. 
In  1866,  he  entered  the  Regular  Army,  with  which  he 
remained  until  April  4,  1893,  when  he  was  retired  at  his 
own  request,  having  served  over  thirty  years  and  not  then 
being  of  the  age  to  be  retired  by  law.  After  his  retirement, 
he  lived  in  Philadelphia  until  his  death,  which  occurred  at 
his  home  on  December  3,  191 5,  from  complications  result- 
ing from  a  severe  attack  of  bronchitis.  He  was  buried  in 
Edgewood  Cemetery  at  Pottstown. 

General  Neide  was  a  member  of  the  Pennsylvania  Com- 
mandery  of  the  Military  Order  of  the  Loyal  Legion.  About 
two  months  before  his  death,  he  was  elected  one  of  the  vice 
presidents  of  the  Yale  Alumni  Association  of  Philadelphia. 

He  was  married  in  Philadelphia,  March  19,  1863,  to 
Mary  M.,  daughter  of  John  Richard  and  Rebecca  (Robin- 
son) Jones  of  Doylestown,  Pa.  She  died  August  17,  1870, 
in  Indianapolis,  Ind.,  and  is  also  buried  in  Edgewood  Ceme- 
tery. General  Neide  is  survived  by  one  daughter,  Blanche 
Elizabeth.  He  was  a  brother  of  Carroll  Neide,  a  non-grad- 
uate member  of  the  College  Class  of  1863. 


Luther  Hills  Peirce,  B.A.   1858 

Born  June  4,  1837,  in  Bangor,  Maine 
Died  October  20,  1915,  in  Chicago,  111. 

Luther  Hills  Peirce,  son  of  Waldo  Treat  and  Hannah 
Jane  (Hills)  Peirce,  was  born  in  Bangor,  Maine,  June  4, 
1837.  His  preparation  for  college  was  received  at  Gen- 
eral Russell's  Collegiate  and  Commercial  Institute  in  New 


24  YALE    COLLEGE 

Haven,  Conn.,  and  he  entered  Yale  in  1854,  being  gradu- 
ated four  years  later. 

He  was  associated  with  his  brother  in  the  lumber,  ship- 
ping, and  commission  business  in  Bangor  from  1858  to 
i860,  but  in  May,  1861,  entered  the  Union  Army  as  quarter- 
master sergeant  of  the  Second  Maine  Infantry,  being 
appointed  captain  and  assistant  quartermaster  of  volunteers 
six  months  later.  He  served  in  the  Army  until  August, 
1858,  holding  appointment  after  the  close  of  the  Civil  War 
as  brevet  major  and  brevet  lieutenant  colonel,  and,  finally, 
as  chief  quartermaster  of  the  Fourth  Military  District. 
In  1868,  he  entered  the  real  estate  business  in  Chicago,  111., 
becoming  a  member  of  his  father-in-law's  firm  of  J.  H. 
Rees  &  Company,  the  name  of  which  was  later  changed  to 
Rees,  Peirce  &  Company.  For  some  years  previous  to  his 
death,  Mr.  Peirce  conducted  the  business  under  his  own 
name.  He  had  mining  interests  in  Colorado,  and  was  a 
member  of  the  lumber  firm  of  Hilliard,  Peirce  &  Company 
of  Chicago. 

By  the  will  of  Mr.  Peirce,  who  died  at  his  home  in  Chi- 
cago, October  20,  191 5,  a  bequest  amounting  to  about 
$27,000  was  made  to  Yale. 

His  marriage  took  place  in  Chicago,  June  20,  1866,  to 
Helen  Caroline,  an  adopted  daughter  of  James  H.  and 
Harriet  F.  Rees,  whose  death  occurred  on  December  15, 
191 1.  They  had  two  children, — a  son,  Charles  Bowman, 
and  a  daughter,  Clara  Marriner. 


Homer  George  Newton,  B.A.   1859 

Born  October  25,  1835,  in  Sherburne,  N.  Y. 
Died  October  11,  1915,  in  Sherburne,  N.  Y. 

Homer  George  Newton,  son  of  William  Newton,  a 
farmer  and  contractor,  whose  parents  were  Asahel  Newton, 
who  served  as  a  private  in  a  Connecticut  regiment  in  the 
Revolution,  and  Versalle  (Booth)  Newton,  was  born  in 
Sherburne,  N.  Y.,  October  25,  1835.  His  mother  was  Lois, 
daughter  of  Richard  and  Mercy  (Sage)  Butler,  grand- 
daughter of  Solomon  Sage,  and  a  descendant  of  Governor 
Robert  Treat.  He  was  fitted  for  college  at  the  Hopkins 
Grammar  School  in  New  Haven,  and  at  Yale  was  awarded 


1858-1859  25 

a  third  prize  for  declamation  in  Sophomore  Year,  received 
Oration  appointments  and  an  election  to  Phi  Beta  Kappa, 
and  spoke  at  Commencement.  He  was  a  member  of  Lino- 
nia,  and  served  as  a  Class  deacon. 

In  the  fall  of  1861,  after  a  year  spent  at  home,  during 
which  he  read  anatomy,  he  began  the  study  of  medicine  at 
New  York  University,  where  he  received  the  degree  of 
M.D.  two  years  later.  During  the  Civil  War,  he  served  for 
over  a  year  as  assistant  surgeon  in  the  One  Hundred  and 
Thirty-first  Regiment,  New  York  Volunteers.  He  spent  the 
winter  of  1865  studying  in  New  York  City,  and  in  the  fol- 
lowing spring  began  practice  in  Brooklyn.  In  1868,  he 
formed  a  partnership  with  Dr.  Arthur  Mathewson  (B.A. 
1858,  M.D.  New  York  University  1861)  for  the  practice  of 
ophthalmic  and  aural  medicine.  The  following  year,  they 
published  a  translation  of  a  German  work  on  diseases  of  the 
ear.  In  1868,  with  Dr.  Cornelius  R.  Agnew,  who  received 
from  Columbia  the  degree  of  B.A.  in  1849  ^^^^^  that  of  M.D. 
in  1852,  they  were  associated  in  the  establishment  of  the 
Brooklyn  Eye  and  Ear  Hospital,  where  they  served  as 
assistant  surgeons  until  Dr.  Agnew,  with  his  colleague,  D. 
B.  St.  John  Roosa  (B.A.  i860,  M.D.  New  York  University 
i860)  withdrew  to  establish  the  Manhattan  Eye  and  Ear 
Hospital,  at  which  time  they  were  made  surgeons.  Dr. 
Newton  went  abroad  in  November,  1869,  and  attended 
clinics  at  the  ophthalmic  hospitals  in  London  and  studied  in 
Berlin  and  Vienna,  upon  his  return  a  year  later  resuming 
his  practice  in  Brooklyn. 

His  health  failed  in  1874,  and  in  the  spring  he  went  to 
California.  After  spending  a  short  time  in  Los  Angeles, 
he  and  his  wife  joined  the  Indiana  Colony,  which  was  the 
beginning  of  the  city  of  Pasadena,  and  took  an  active  part 
in  its  development.  Dr.  Newton  was  one  of  the  organizers 
of  the  Pasadena  Presbyterian  church,  and  was  chosen  one 
of  its  elders.  In  1877,  he  returned  to  Sherburne,  and  for 
the  next  two  years  was  employed  as  a  clerk  in  the  National 
Bank  at  Norwich,  N.  Y.  His  health  again  forced  him  to 
seek  an  out-of-door  life,  and  he  was  then  engaged  in  agri- 
cultural pursuits  until  the  spring  of  1883,  when  he  became 
cashier  of  the  Sherburne  National  Bank.  After  five  years, 
he  was  again  compelled  to  give  up  nearly  all  activities, 
although  he  continued  as  vice  president  of  the  bank  until 
his  death,  which  occurred,  from  infirmities  incident  to  his 


2  6  YALE  COLLEGE 

years,  at  his  home  in  Sherburne,  October  ii,  1915.  He  was 
buried  in  Sherburne.  Since  1908,  he  had  been  totally  blind. 
By  his  will,  a  bequest  of  one  thousand  dollars  was  made  to 
Yale-in-China, 

He  was  married  in  Sherburne,  November  i,  1869,  to 
Anna  Grace,  daughter  of  Joshua  and  Anna  Pratt.  They 
had  no  children.  Isaac  Sprague  Newton  (B.A.  1848)  and 
Hubert  Anson  Newton  (B.A.  1850)  were  brothers  of  Dr. 
Newton.  His  nephews,  Howard  Dunlap  Newton,  I.  Bur- 
kett  Newton,  William  Lewis  Newton,  and  Edward  Payson 
Newton,  graduated  from  the  College  in  1879,  1883,  1893, 
and  1897,  respectively. 


Joseph  Tabor  Tatuni-,  B.A.   1859 

Born  August  7,  1837,  in  St.  Louis,  Mo. 
Died  January  8,  1916,  in  Los  Angeles,  Gal. 

It  has  been  impossible  to  secure  the  desired  information 
for  an  obituary  sketch  of  Mr.  Tatum  in  time  for  publica- 
tion in  this  volume.  A  sketch  will  appear  in  a  subsequent 
issue  of  the  Obituary  Record. 


Henry  Winn,  B.A.   1859 

Born  December  8,  1837,  in  Whitingham,  Vt. 
Died  January  24,  1916,  in  Maiden,  Mass. 

Henry  Winn  was  born  in  Whitingham,  Vt.,  December  8, 
1837,  the  son  of  Reuben  Winn,  who  served  for  a  number 
of  years  in  the  State  Senate  of  Vermont,  and  a  descendant 
of  Edward  Winn,  who  came  to  this  country  from  England 
in  1635  ^^^  settled  at  Woburn,  Mass.  His  mother  was 
Betsey,  daughter  of  Capt.  Samuel  Parker.  He  was  fitted 
for  college  at  the  Shelburne  Falls  (Mass.)  Academy,  and 
at  Yale  belonged  to  the  Nautilus  Boat  Club,  Linonia,  and 
Phi  Beta  Kappa,  and  received  Oration  appointments. 

During  the  year  following  his  graduation,  he  taught  at 
the  high  school  in  Worcester,  Mass.,  at  the  same  time 
studying  in  the  law  office  of  Dwight  Foster  (B.A.  1848). 
He  was  registered  in  the  Harvard  Law  School  from  i860 


i859  27 

to  1862,  and  after  his  admission  to  the  bar  acted  for  a  year 
as  assistant  to  the  attorney  general  of  Massachusetts.  In 
1861,  he  went  to  Washington,  D.  C,  to  accept  an  appoint- 
ment as  clerk  to  the  Committee  on  Foreign  Relations  of 
the  Senate.  On  his  return  to  Boston,  he  resumed  his  duties 
at  the  State  House,  and  at  this  time  drafted  the  savings 
bank  tax  act,  which  was  the  foundation  of  the  corporation 
tax  system  of  the  state.  He  served  for  ten  months  in  the 
Civil  War  as  major  of  the  Fifty-second  Massachusetts 
Regiment,  which  he  had  organized.  Returning  to  Massa- 
chusetts in  1863,  he  was  for  twelve  years  engaged  in  manu- 
facturing locks  at  Shelburne  Falls,  at  first  with  the  Yale 
Lock  Company  and  afterwards  with  the  Winn  Lock  Com- 
pany. In  1875,  he  gave  up  that  business,  and  resumed  the 
practice  of  law  in  Shelburne  Falls.  He  was  elected  to  the 
Massachusetts  House  of  Representatives  in  1876,  and  two 
years  later  became  a  state  senator,  serving  in  the  latter  capa- 
city for  two  years.  During  his  terms  in  the  House  and 
Senate,  he  was  very  active,  proposing  many  measures  and 
serving  on  many  committees. 

In  the  later  years  of  his  life,  he  resided  at  Maiden,  while 
having  a  law  office  in  Boston.  In  1892,  he  was  elected 
mayor  of  Maiden,  and  served  in  that  capacity  for  one  term. 
He  was  nominated  to  Congress  on  the  Democratic  ticket 
from  the  seventh  district  of  Massachusetts  in  1900,  but  was 
not  elected.  He  had  contributed  extensively  to  the  press, 
especially  on  the  subject  of  reform  in  taxation,  and  was 
the  author  of  ^'Property  in  Land:  An  Essay  on  the  New 
Crusade"  (1888),  an  important  essay  on  Multiple-Standard 
Money,  and  many  other  monographs  on  economic  subjects 
and  taxation.  On  account  of  his  highly-developed  execu- 
tive ability,  he  was  several  times  called  upon  to  aid  in 
reorganizing  business  concerns  which  were  on  the  point  of 
failure. 

Mr.  Winn's  death  occurred  January  24,  1916,  at  his  home 
in  Maiden,  after  a  brief  illness  following  a  slight  paralytic 
shock  suffered  some  time  previously.  He  was  buried  at 
North  Adams,  Mass. 

He  was  married  November  24,  1865,  to  Madelene, 
daughter  of  Linus  Yale,  Jr.,  and  Katharine  (Brooks)  Yale, 
from  whom  he  was  afterwards  divorced.  Their  elder  son, 
Philip  Henry,  who  studied  at  the  Massachusetts  Institute 
of  Technology  from  1884  to  1886,  survives,  but  the  younger, 


YALE  COLLEGE 


Sydney  Yale  (M.D.  Harvard  1894)  died  in  November, 
191 5.  On  November  30,  1880,  Mr.  Winn  was  married  a 
second  time  to  Julia  Eva,  daughter  of  Orlando  Merrill. 
Her  death  occurred  June  27,  1908. 


Arthur  Williams  Wright,  B.A.   1859 

Born  September  8,  1836,  in  Lebanon,  Conn. 
Died  December  19,  191S,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 

Arthur  Williams  Wright  was  born  September  8,  1836, 
in  Lebanon,  Conn.,  where  his  father,  Jesse  Wright,  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Connecticut  House  of  Representatives  in  1839, 
served  as  justice  of  the  peace,  selectman,  and  member  of 
the  School  Board.  His  paternal  grandparents  were  Jesse 
and  Mehitable  (Clark)  Wright.  Samuel  Wright,  who 
came  in  1639  from  Essex,  England,  to  Springfield,  Mass., 
where  he  was  made  the  first  deacon  in  the  Congregational 
Church,  was  his  earliest  American  ancestor.  His  mother 
was  Harriet,  daughter  of  William  and  Lydia  (Loomis) 
Williams  and  a  descendant  of  Robert  Williams,  who  came 
to  this  country  from  England  in  1637,  settling  at  Roxbury, 
Mass. 

He  received  his  early  education  in  his  native  town,  and 
later  attended  Bacon  Academy  at  Colchester,  Conn.,  the 
principal  of  which  was  William  Kinne  (B.A.  -1848),  at 
whose  private  school  in  Canterbury  his  preparation  for  col- 
lege was  completed.  At  Yale,  he  received  numerous  prizes 
in  Latin  and  mathematics  and,  in  Senior  year,  the  Clark 
premium  for  the  solution  of  problems  in  practical  astron- 
omy. His  appointments  were  High  Orations,  and  he  was 
a  member  of  Phi  Beta  Kappa,  and  spoke  at  Junior  Exhibi- 
tion and  at  Commencement.  He  served  on  the  Class  Com- 
mittee for  Presentation  Day,  and  belonged  to  several 
musical  organizations  and  to  Linonia. 

After  graduation,  he  continued  his  studies  in  mathematics, 
mineralogy,  botany,  and  modern  languages  at  Yale,  taking 
his  Ph.D.  in  1861,  and  during  this  period,  he  served  as  an 
assistant  in  the  Yale  College  Library,  and,  from  i860  to 
1863,  as  librarian  of  Linonia.  For  a  few  months  in  i860, 
he  also  taught  at  General  Russell's  Collegiate  and  Commer- 
cial Institute.    He  was  on  the  staff  of  revisers  of  the  1864 


i859  29 

edition  of  Webster's  Dictionary,  for  which  he  also  prepared 
articles  on  Orthography  and  the  Rules  for  Spelling 
Certain  Classes  of  Words.  (He  assisted  also  in  the  com- 
l)ilation  of  the  edition  of  the  dictionary  published  twenty- 
six  years  later.) 

In  1863,  he  became  a  tutor  at  Yale,  serving  until  1866 
in  the  Latin  department  and  for  the  next  two  years  in  that 
of  natural  philosophy.  During  1867-68,  he  held  as  well  an 
instructorship  in  physics  in  the  Scientific  School.  He 
studied  abroad,  at  Heidelberg  and  Berlin,  the  following 
year,  and  in  the  fall  of  1869  took  up  his  work  as  professor 
of  physics  and  chemistry  at  Williams  College,  to  which 
chair  he  had  been  appointed  in  1868.  In  1872,  he  returned 
to  Yale  as  professor  of  molecular  physics  and  chemistry. 
In  1887,  the  title  of  his  professorship  was  changed  to  that 
of  experimental  physics,  which  he  held  until  his  retirement 
in  1906,  when  he  was  made  professor  emeritus.  The  first 
Sloane  Physics  Laboratory  was  built  after  his  plans  and 
under  his  supervision  in  1882-83,  and  thereafter  he  held  his 
classes  there. 

From  1881  to  1886,  he  was  one  of  the  consulting  special- 
ists of  the  United  States  Signal  Service,  and  in  1887  he 
served  upon  the  Annual  Assay  Commission  to  test  the 
weight  and  fineness  of  the  gold  and  silver  coins  at  the  mint 
at  Philadelphia,  being  chairman  of  the  committee  on  weigh- 
ing and  preparing  its  report.  His  method  of  applying  the 
cathode  discharge  in  vacuo  to  the  production  of  metallic 
films  upon  glass  and  other  materials,  forming  brilliant  mir- 
rors, which  he  originated  in  1877,  has  since  been  exten- 
sively used.  He  was  a  member  of  the  party  sent  out  by 
the  United  States  Naval  Observatory  in  the  summer  of 
1878,  under  Professor  Asaph  Hall,  and  stationed  at  La- 
Junta,  Colo.,  to  observe  the  total  eclipse  of  the  sun.  He 
made  successful  observations  of  the  polarization  of  the  solar 
corona,  obtaining  for  the  first  time  measurements  of  its 
mount,  and  the  results  of  his  investigations  were  later  pub- 
lished. In  1876,  he  observed  for  the  first  time  the  occur- 
rence of  gases  in  stony  meteorites,  and  analyzed  them  as 
those  of  iron  meteorites,  investigated  their  spectra,  and  the 
relation  of  these  to  the  spectra  of  comets.  On  the  discovery 
of  the  rays  called  X-rays  by  Professor  Roentgen  in  1895, 
he  repeated  his  experiments,  and  was  the  first  in  America  to 
obtain  definite  results,  making  many  experimental  investiga- 


30  YALE  COLLEGE 

tions,  the  results  of  which  were  announced  in  papers  read 
before  the  National  Academy  of  Sciences,  and  published 
in  various  journals,  especially  The  American  Journal  of 
Science.  Several  other  investigations  formed  the  subjects 
of  memoirs  contributed  to  the  same  journal  and  elsewhere, 
and  he  had  published  many  other  scientific  articles.  He 
was  the  author  of  a  number  of  biographical  memoirs, 
including  several  of  both  the  elder  and  younger  Benjamin 
Silliman.  He  was  a  member  of  the  New  Haven  Colony 
Historical  Society,  a  Fellow  of  the  Royal  Astronomical 
Society  of  Great  Britain  and  of  the  American  Association 
for  the  Advancement  of  Science,  and  a  member  of  many 
other  learned  societies.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Church 
of  Christ  in  Yale  College  from  1855  until  his  death. 

While  a  tutor  at  Yale,  Professor  Wright  had  studied  law 
and  been  admitted  to  the  bar,  but  he  had  never  practiced. 
From  1859  to  1869,  and  also  for  the  last  six  years  before 
his  death,  he  served  as  Secretary  of  the  Class  of  1859,  and 
he  had  edited  both  its  Triennial  Record  and  the  Class 
Record  published  in  1914. 

Professor  Wright's  death  occurred  December  19,  191 5, 
at  his  home  in  New  Haven,  Conn.,  after  an  illness  of  about 
two  months  due  to  infirmities  incident  to  his  advanced  age. 
Interment  was  in  Grove  Street  Cemetery. 

He  was  married  in  New  Haven,  October  6,  1875,  to  Susan 
Forbes,  daughter  of  Professor  Benjamin  Silliman  (B.A. 
1837,  M.D.  Medical  College  of  South  Carolina  1849,  LL.D. 
Jefferson  Medical  College  1884)  and  Susan  Huldah 
(Forbes)  Silliman  and  sister  of  Benjamin  Silliman,  who 
received  the  degree  of  B.A.  at  Yale  in  1870.  Her  death 
occurred  on  February  17,  1890.  They  had  four  children: 
Susan  Silliman,  who  married  Winchester  Bennett  (Ph.B. 
1897);  Edith  (died  January  17,  1881)  ;  Arthur  Silliman, 
and  Dorothea  Silliman,  the  wife  of  Edwin  Pugsley,  a 
graduate  of  the  College  in  1908  and  of  the  Massachusetts 
Institute  of  Technology  in  191 1.  Professor  Wright's  half- 
brother,  Edwin  Wright,  took  the  degree  of  B.A.  at  Yale  in 
1844,  and  his  brother,  Alexander  Hamilton  Wright,  was  a 
member  of  the  Class  of  1863,  and  three  years  after  his 
graduation  from  Yale  received  his  LL.B.  at  George  Wash- 
ington University.  He  was  a  brother-in-law  of  William  R. 
Belknap  (Ph.B.  1869),  whose  son,  William,  was  graduated 
from  the  College  in  1908;    of  Robert  Kelly,  who  received 


i859  31 

the  degree  of  B.A.  at  Yale  in  1870  and  that  of  LL.B.  at 
Columbia  in  1873,  and  who  had  three  sons, — Robert  (B.A. 
1896),  William,  a  non-graduate  member  of  the  Class  of 
1897  S.,  and  Trumbull  (Ph.B.  1900);  and  of  William  A. 
Rogers  (Ph.B.  1874),  whose  son,  William  Silliman,  was 
graduated  from  the  College  in  1910.  His  half-sister,  Ange- 
iine,  who  attended  a  course  of  lectures  at  Yale  in  1849, 
married  Julian  Vail  Pettis  (B.A.  1836). 


Edwin  Henry  Yundt,  B.A.   1859 

Born  January  8,  1838,  in  Blue  Ball,  Pa. 
Died  October  6,  191 5,  in  Blue  Ball,  Pa. 

Edwin  Henry  Yundt  was  born  January  8,  1838,  in  Blue 
Ball,  Lancaster  County,  Pa.,  the  son  of  Henry  and  Maria 
Magdalena  (Kinzer)  Yundt.  His  ancestors  were  farmers 
and  large  landowners,  and  came  to  Lancaster  County  very 
early — on  the  paternal  side  in  1749  from  Switzerland,  and 
on  the  maternal  side  in  1726  from  Germany.  They  took 
up  the  rich  limestone  lands  in  Lancaster  County,  and  some 
of  their  descendants  still  occupy  them,  or  portions  of  them. 

He  attended  the  Moravian  School  at  Lititz,  Pa.,  and  the 
West  Chester  (Pa.)  Academy,  before  entering  Yale,  where 
he  belonged  to  Linonia,  was  one  of  the  Cochleaureati  for 
the  Wooden  Spoon  Exhibition  and  a  member  of  the  Class 
Committee  for  Presentation  Day,  and  received  Dispute 
appointments. 

After  graduation,  he  studied  law  under  his  cousin,  Isaac 
Ellmaker  Hiester  (B.A.  1842),  in  Lancaster,  Pa.,  where  he 
was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  September,  1861.  He  practiced 
there  until  1878,  when,  owing  to  an  impaired  nervous  con- 
dition, he  retired.  Soon  afterwards,  he  returned  to  the  place 
of  his  birth,  where  he  built  a  home  and  remained  until  his 
death,  which  occurred  October  6,  191 5,  being  directly  due 
to  hardening  of  the  arteries.  Burial  was  in  Bergstrasse 
Cemetery,  near  Ephrata,  in  Lancaster  County. 

He  had  never  married,  and  since  his  retirement  had  led 
a  secluded  life,  devoting  much  time  to  reading  English  and 
German  literature.  Of  his  seven  sisters  and  two  brothers, 
one  brother,  Horace  Archibald  Yundt  (B.A.  Franklin  and 
Marshall   1859),  who  held  a  captain's  commission  in  the 


32  YALE    COLLEGE 

Civil  War,  and  three  sisters  survive  him.  His  younger 
brother,  Winfield  Scott  Yundt,  graduated  at  Jefferson  Medi- 
cal College  in  1866,  and  served  four  years  in  the  Army  as 
a  surgeon  during  the  Civil  War.  W.  Brooke  Dunwoody 
(B.A.  191 1,  M.F.  1916)  is  a  grand-nephew  of  Mr.  Yundt. 
In  1878,  Mr.  Yundt  declined  the  nomination  for  president 
judge  of  the  courts  of  Lancaster  County.  For  five  years  he 
served  as  editor  of  the  Lancaster  Bar. 


Francis  Delafield,  B.A.   i860 

Born  August  3,  1841,  in  New  York  City 
Died  July  17,  1915,  in  Noroton,  Conn. 

Francis  Delafield  was  born  in  New  York  City,  August  3, 
1841.  He  was  the  son  of  Dr.  Edward  Delafield  by  his 
second  marriage  to  Julia,  daughter  of  Col.  NicoU  Floyd 
and  Mary  (Gelston)  Floyd.  His  paternal  grandparents 
were  John  Delafield,  who  came  to  this  country  from  Oxford- 
shire, England,  in  1783,  and  Ann  (Hallett)  Delafield.  His 
father  graduated  from  Yale  College  in  1812,  and  after 
taking  his  medical  degree  at  Columbia  in  1816,  practiced  his 
profession  in  New  York  City  for  many  years ;  he  was  one 
of  the  founders  of  the  New  York  Eye  and  Ear  Infirmary, 
Roosevelt  Hospital,  and  the  College  of  Physicians  and  Sur- 
geons, of  which  latter  he  was  president  from  1858  until 
his  death  in  1875. 

Francis  Delafield  was  fitted  for  college  in  private  schools 
in  New  York  City,  and  at  Yale  received  a  Dissertation 
appointment  in  Junior  year  and  an  Oration  at  Commence- 
ment, and  was  a  member  of  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 

In  1863,  he  was  graduated  from  the  College  of  Physicians 
and  Surgeons  at  Columbia,  and  then  for  some  months  con- 
tinued his  medical  studies  abroad, — in  Paris,  Berlin,  and 
London.  Upon  his  return  to  this  country  in  1865,  he  took 
up  the  practice  of  his  profession  in  New  York  City,  at  the 
same  time  continuing  his  investigations  in  pathology.  He 
was  the  founder  of  the  first  pathological  laboratory  in  this 
country.  His  writings  upon  pathological  subjects  are 
accepted  as  standard  authorities.  His  first  important  liter- 
ary work,  "A  Handbook  of  Post-Mortem  Examination 
and  Morbid  Anatomy,"   which  appeared  in  1872,  was  later 


I 859-1860  33 

rewritten  and  i^reatly  enlare^ed,  in  collaboration  with  T. 
Mitchell  PriKkien  (Ph.B.  1872,  M.D.  1875),  beini^  pub- 
lished in  1885,  under  the  title,  "A  Handbook  of  Pathological 
Anatomy  and  Histology."  This  is  now  in  general  use  as 
a  textbook  in  medical  colleges,  and  as  a  book  of  reference 
by  many  practitioners.  In  1878,  appeared  his  "Manual  of 
Physical  Diagnosis,"  and  his  book,  "Diseases  of  the  Kid- 
neys," was  written  in  1895.  Another  achievement  was  his 
classification  of  the  group  of  diseases  generally  treated 
under  pulmonary  consumption.  Probably  his  most  impor- 
tant contribution  to  the  field  of  medical  science  was  "Studies 
in  Pathological  Anatomy,"  published  in  1882,  and  covering 
a  long  period  of  research.  Since  1868,  when  he  became  a 
lecturer  on  pathological  anatomy  in  the  College  of  Physi- 
cians and  Surgeons,  Dr.  Delafield  had  been  a  member  of 
the  Faculty  of  Columbia  University.  In  1875,  he  was 
appointed  adjunct  professor  of  medicine  under  Professor 
Alonzo  Clark  (B.A.  Williams  1828,  M.D.  Columbia  1833), 
and  upon  the  latter's  retirement  in  1882  was  elected  his 
successor,  as  professor  of  pathology  and  the  practice  of 
medicine,  being  made  professor  emeritus  in  1901.  For  a 
number  of  years,  he  was  attached  to  the  staff  of  Bellevue 
Hospital,  at  first  as  a  member  of  the  house  staff,  later  as 
attending  physician,  and  finally  as  consulting  physician.  He 
had  served  also  as  pathologist  and  attending  physician  to 
Roosevelt  Hospital  and  as  surgeon  to  the  New  York  Eye 
and  Ear  Infirmary.  In  1890,  he  was  honored  with  the 
degree  of  LL.D.  from  Yale,  and,  in  1904,  Columbia  con- 
ferred a  similar  degree  upon  him.  He  held  membership  in 
the  New  York  County  Medical  Society,  the  New  York 
Academy  of  Medicine,  the  Pathological  Society,  and  the 
Association  of  American  Physicians,  being  the  first  presi- 
dent of  the  latter  organization.  He  belonged  to  many 
organizations,  including  the  Century  Club  and  the  St. 
Nicholas  Society,  and  was  a  member  of  Grace  Church. 

Dr.  Delafield's  death  occurred  July  17,  1915,  in  Noroton, 
Conn.,  where  he  was  visiting  his  sister.  For  some  time  he 
had  been  in  poor  health,  and  a  week  before  his  death  suf- 
fered an  attack  of  apoplexy.  Burial  was  in  Grace  Church 
Cemetery  at  Jamaica,  Long  Island. 

He  was  married  January  17,  1870,  to  Katharine,  daugh- 
ter of  General  Henry  VanRensselaer  and  Elisabeth  Ray 
(King)  VanRensselaer,  who  died  in  1901.     They  had  three 


34  YALE    COLLEGE 

daughters,  Elisabeth  Ray,  JuHa  Floyd  (Mrs.  Frederic  V.  S. 
Crosby),  and  Cornelia  VanRensselaer,  and  a  son,  Edward 
Henry,  all  of  whom  survive.  The  son  is  a  member  of  the 
College  Class  of  1902.  Dr.  Delafield's  uncle,  Joseph  Dela- 
field,  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  at  Yale  in  1808. 


William  Edward  Foster,  B.A.   i860 

Born  June  4,  1839,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  August  25,  1915,  in  Buffalo,  N.  Y. 

William  Edward  Foster  was  born  in  New  Haven,  Conn., 
June  4,  1839,  his  father  being  Eleazer  Kingsbury  Foster, 
a  graduate  of  Yale  College  in  the  Class  of  1834,  who 
practiced  as  a  lawyer  in  New  Haven  for  a  number  of  years, 
representing  that  city  in  the  General  Assembly  for  several 
terms,  and  serving  later  as  judge  of  probate,  state's  attorney 
for  New  Haven  County,  and  register  in  bankruptcy.  He 
was  the  son  of  Eleazer  Foster  (B.A.  1802),  by  his  wife, 
Mary  (Pierpont)  Foster,  who  was  a  great-granddaughter 
of  Rev.  James  Pierpont,  a  member  of  Yale's  first  board  of 
trustees,  and  a  descendant  of  Jacob  Heminway  (B.A.  1704). 
William  E.  Foster's  mother  was  Mary,  daughter  of  Wil- 
liam Collins  and  Sarah  Smith  (King)  Codrington  of 
Jamaica,  West  Indies. 

In  Sophomore  year  at  college,  he  was  awarded  a  first 
prize  for  excellence  in  declamation  and  a  first  prize  in  the 
Linonia  debate,  and  he  received  a  Colloquy  appointment 
Junior  year  and  a  Dispute  at  Commencement,  when  he  was 
one  of  the  speakers. 

He  began  the  study  of  law  directly  after  graduation,  at 
first  in  Auburn,  N.  Y.,  and  later  in  his  father's  ofiice  in 
New  Haven.  In  the  spring  of  1861,  he  accepted  a  commis- 
sion on  the  staff  of  the  quartermaster  general  of  Con- 
necticut, which  he  resigned  in  July,  1862,  to  become  a 
paymaster  in  the  Navy.  At  that  time,  he  was  assigned  to 
duty  on  the  Memphis,  on  which  he  served  until  the  close 
of  the  Civil  War.  On  returning  to  his  native  town,  he 
again  took  up  his  law  studies,  and  was  soon  admitted  to  the 
bar  in  New  Haven. 

Not  long  afterwards,  he  went  to  Florida,  remaining  at 
St.  Augustine  until  June,  1868.     From  November  of  that 


i860  35 

year  until  March,  1870,  he  was  located  in  Lynchburg,  Va., 
as  editor  and  part  owner  of  the  Daily  Republican.  Since 
that  time,  he  had  been  engaged  in  the  editorial  conduct  of 
the  Buffalo  (N.  Y.)  Commercial  Advertiser,  at  first  as  asso- 
ciate editor  and,  from  1878,  as  editor-in-chief.  In  191 1,  he 
retired  from  active  newspaper  work,  although  still  retaining 
his  position  as  managing  editor. 

Mr.  Foster  belonged  to  Trinity  Church  (Protestant 
Episcopal)  of  Buffalo  and  to  the  Military  Order  of  the 
Loyal  Legion.  In  1905,  he  was  elected  president  of  the 
Yale  Alumni  Association  of  Buffalo,  and  served  in  that 
capacity  for  three  years. 

His  death  occurred  in  Buffalo  on  August  25,  191 5,  fol- 
lowing an  illness  of  three  years  due  to  paralysis.  Interment 
was  in  Forest  Lawn  Cemetery  in  that  city.  He  was  married 
in  New  Haven,  August  14,  1862,  to  Sarah  Elyot,  daughter 
of  Frederic  Joel  Betts,  a  graduate  of  Williams  College  in 
1 82 1,  and  Mary  Ward  (Scoville)  Betts  and  sister  of 
Frederic  H.  Betts  (B.A.  1864,  LL.B.  Columbia  1866)  and 
C.  Wyllys  Betts  (B.A.  1867,  LL.B.  Columbia  1869).  Of 
their  three  children,  the  son,  Frederic  Betts,  died  in  1888, 
when  fifteen  years  of  age,  and  the  older  daughter,  May 
Husted,  in  1890,  at  the  age  of  nineteen.  The  other  daugh- 
ter, Louise  Holbrook,  is  the  wife  of  Mr.  Albert  Steele 
Thompson  of  Buffalo.  Mr.  Foster's  two  brothers  were 
graduated  at  Yale,  Eleazer  Kingsbury  in  the  College  Class 
of  1863,  and  John  Pierrepont  Codrington  with  the  degree 
of  B.A.  in  1869,  M.D.  in  1875,  and  Honorary  M.A.  in  1909. 
The  latter's  sons  are  Allen  Evarts  Foster  (B.A.  1906,  LL.B. 
Harvard  1909)  and  William  Edward  Foster,  2d  (Ph.B. 
1907). 

Lucius  Hopkins  Higgins,  B.A.   i860 

Born  July  4,  1832,  in  Southington,  Conn. 
Died  January  25,  1916,  in  West  Hartford,  Conn. 


I 


Lucius  Hopkins  Higgins,  son  of  Timothy  Higgins,  a 
tanner,  was  born  in  Southington,  Conn.,  July  4,  1832,  his 
paternal  grandparents  being  Timothy  and  Hannah  (Allen) 
Higgins.  His  mother  was  Jennette,  daughter  of  Elisha 
and  Laura  (Hopkins)  Carter.  His  preparatory  training 
was  received  at  the  schools  in  Plantsville,   Conn.,  and   at 


36  YALE    COLLEGE 

the  Monson  (Mass.)  Academy.  He  entered  Yale  in  1857, 
from  Amherst  College,  where  he  had  spent  part  of  Fresh- 
man year. 

After  his  graduation  in  i860,  he  entered  the  Yale  Theo- 
logical Department,  but  left  a  year  later  to  continue  his 
studies  for  the  ministry  at  Andover  Theological  Seminary. 
He  was  graduated  there  in  1863,  and,  in  June,  1866,  after 
spending  the  intervening  period  at  New  Haven,  engaged  in 
study  and  occasional  preaching,  was  ordained  and  installed 
as  pastor  of  the  Congregational  Church  at  Lanark,  111. 
There  he  remained  for  a  little  over  eight  years,  resigning 
in  1874  on  account  of  poor  health.  In  September  of  that 
year,  he  returned  to  New  Haven,  Conn.,  and  the  following 
March  accepted  a  call  to  the  Huntington  (Conn.)  Congre- 
gational Church.  His  next  charge  was  at  Mount  Carmel, 
Conn.,  where  he  went  in  October,  1881.  Seven  years  later, 
he  became  pastor  of  the  Congregational  Church  at  Hanover, 
Conn.  In  December,  1900,  he  resigned  from  that  pastorate, 
and  had  since  lived  quietly  in  West  Hartford,  Conn.  He 
preached  occasionally,  but  gave  most  of  his  time  to  writing 
and  study. 

His  death  occurred  at  his  home  on  January  25,  1916, 
from  acute  Bright's  disease,  after  a  lingering  illness. 
Burial  was  in  Grove  Street  Cemetery,  New  Haven. 

Mr.  Higgins  was  married  September  3,  1863,  in  that 
city  to  Louise  Young,  daughter  of  Isaiah  Aurelius  and 
Nancy  Blakeslee.  She  survives  him  with  six  children: 
Edwin  Aurelius;  Jennette  Carter,  who  is  the  wife  of  Fred 
M.  Preston  of  Pine  Castle,  Fla. ;  Henry  Dewitte;  Mary 
Edwards  (Mrs.  J.  F.  Russell  of  Los  Angeles,  Cal.)  ;  Gould 
Shelton  (M.D.  1901),  and  David  Winne.  Their  youngest 
child.  Homer  Blakeslee,  died  in  childhood. 


Charles  Henry  Vandyne,  B.A.   i860 

Born  February  8,  1838,  in  New  York  City 
Died  December  28,  191 5,  in  New  York  City 

Charles  Henry  Vandyne,  son  of  Henry  and  Emily  G. 
(Mead)  Vandyne,  was  born  in  New  York  City,  February 
8,  1838.  He  joined  the  Class  of  i860  at  Yale  in  the  second 
term  of  Freshman  year.     In  Sophomore  and  Senior  years. 


i86o-i86i  $1 

he  was  awarded  first  prizes  in  mathematics,  and  his  scholar- 
ship appointments  were  a  Dispute  Junior  year  and  a  Dis- 
sertation at  Commencement. 

After  spending  a  few  months  in  the  fall  of  i860  at  the 
theological  seminary  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal  Church 
located  near  Alexandria,  Va.,  he  returned  to  New  York  City 
to  complete  his  preparation  for  the  ministry  at  the  General 
Theological  Seminary.  He  was  ordained  to  the  priesthood 
in  August,  1862,  and  soon  afterwards  placed  in  charge  of 
a  mission  church  among  the  poor  in  the  city  of  Chicago. 
In  1872,  he  was  called  to  St.  Matthew's  Church,  Sunbury, 
Pa.,  and  served  there  for  a  year.  He  was  then  rector  succes- 
sively of  churches  at  Waukegan,  111.,  Fonda,  N.  Y.,  and  East 
New  Market,  Md.  His  last  parish  was  that  of  St.  Mary's  at 
Pocomoke  City,  that  state,  from  which  he  resigned  in  1897. 
After  that  time,  he  lived  with  a  sister  in  New  York  City, 
where  he  died  suddenly  December  28,  191 5.  Although  the 
condition  of  his  health  had  not  allowed  him  to  continue  in 
the  active  ministry,  he  had  been  able  to  write  somewhat  for 
the  press  and  magazines. 

He  was  married  August  2,  1867,  to  Helen,  daughter  of 
Isaac  N.  Marselis,  who  received  the  degree  of  M.D.  from 
the  University  of  Pennsylvania  in  1825.  Mrs.  Vandyne's 
death  occurred  June  29,  1895.  They  had  one  son,  who  died 
in  infancy. 

Henry  Rees  Durfee,  B.A.   1861 

Born  October  5,  1840,  in  Palmyra,  N.  Y. 
Died  December  24,  1915,  in  Palmyra,  N.  Y. 

Henry  Rees  Durfee,  son  of  Bailey  Durfee,  whose  father, 
Lemuel  Durfee,  served  as  a  private  in  the  Revolutionary 
War  and  afterwards  settled  in  northeastern  New  York, 
was  born  in  Palmyra,  N.  Y.,  October  5,  1840.  His  mother 
was  Abigail  A.,  daughter  of  William  and  Abigail  Rees. 
Through  his  father,  he  was  descended  from  Thomas  Dur- 
fee, a  Huguenot,  who  came  from  England  to  America  in 
1660  and  settled  at  Portsmouth,  R.  I.  His  maternal  grand- 
parents emigrated  from  Wales  about  1805.  Receiving  his 
preparatory  education  at  the  Palmyra  Classical  Union 
School,   he   entered   Yale    in    1858   as   a    Sophomore.     He 


38  YALE   COLLEGE 

received  Oration  appointments  and  an  election  to  Phi  Beta 
Kappa. 

After  studying  during  1861-62  in  the  office  of  Judge 
Theron  R.  Strong  at  Rochester,  N.  Y.,  he  entered  the 
Albany  Law  School,  where  he  received  the  degree  of  LL.B. 
in  1863.  He  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  December  of  that 
year,  but  owing  to  the  death  of  his  father  soon  afterwards, 
was  compelled  to  take  charge  of  his  business,  and  was  not 
able  to  open  an  office  of  his  own  until  1868.  From  that  time, 
he  practiced  at  Palmyra,  since  1902  being  associated  with 
Mr.  J.  Francis  Lines  as  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Durfee  & 
Lines. 

His  death  occurred  at  his  home  in  Palmyra,  December  24, 
1915,  as  the  result  of  a  complication  of  ailments.  For 
several  years  he  had  suffered  from  rheumatism.  He  was 
buried  in  the  local  cemetery. 

Besides  being  a  member  of  the  New  York  State  Bar 
Association,  he  was,  during  1913-1914,  president  of  the 
Wayne  County  Association.  He  was  prominent  in  political 
affairs,  and  for  many  years  wielded  a  large  political  influ- 
ence, taking  part  in  almost  all  the  Republican  conventions 
of  the  county  and  district.  He  was  a  member  of  the  New 
York  Assembly  of  1871,  and  from  1885  until  1889  served 
as  supervisor  of  the  town  of  Palmyra,  in  1888  being 
appointed  chairman  of  the  Board  of  Supervisors  of  the 
county.  He  was  elected  a  member  of  the  New  York  Con- 
stitutional Convention  which  met  in  1894,  and  took  an  active 
part  in  the  deliberations  of  that  body.  He  frequently  spoke 
at  political  gatherings  and  on  public  occasions,  and  had 
written  a  few  articles  for  the  press.  For  eighteen  years,  he 
was  a  member  of  the  Palmyra  Board  of  Education,  serving 
for  the  last  five  years  of  this  period  as  its  chairman.  After 
holding  the  position  of  treasurer  of  the  Globe  Manufactur- 
ing Company  for  a  long  time,  he  was  made  president,  and 
he  was  also,  from  1899  until  1906,  president  of  the  Peerless 
Printing  Press  Company.  He  had  been  actively  interested 
in  farming,  and  in  recent  years  had  added  to  the  lands  which 
had  been  in  the  family  for  more  than  a  century.  He  was 
a  member  of  the  Western  Palmyra  Presbyterian  Church  of 
Palmyra.  He  was  a  charter  member  of  the  American 
Scenic  and  Historic  Preservation  Society  and  a  member  of 
the  Wayne  County  auxiliary  committee  of  the  State 
Charities  Aid  Association. 


i86i  39 

Mr.  Durfee  was  married  June  6,  1872,  in  New  York 
City  to  Mary  G.,  daughter  of  Charles  B.  and  Mary  Gibbs 
(Coffin)  Hatch,  who  survives  him.    They  had  no  children. 


Milton  Frost,  B.A.  1861 

Born  July  26,  1840,  in  Croton,  N.  Y. 
Died  December  6,  1915,  in  Peekskill,  N.  Y. 

Milton  Frost,  son  of  John  Wright  and  Phebe  (Cocks) 
Frost,  was  born  in  Croton,  N.  Y.,  July  26,  1840.  His 
father,  a  survivor  of  the  War  of  1812,  was  engaged  in  busi- 
ness as  a  manufacturer  of  brick;  was  supervisor  of  the 
town  of  Cortland,  in  Westchester  County,  New  York,  for 
twelve  years,  and  represented  his  district  in  the  Assembly 
of  the  State  of  New  York  in  183 1.  He  was  the  son  of 
Joel  and  Martha  (Wright)  Frost,  his  father  being  a  mem- 
ber of  the  New  York  Assembly  during  the  period  from 
1806  to  1808;  surrogate  and  county  judge  for  Putnam 
County,  New  York,  from  18 13  to  1821 ;  in  1821,  a  member 
of  the  convention  which  revised  the  New  York  State  con- 
stitution ;  and  the  representative  of  Putnam  and  West- 
chester counties  in  the  United  States  Congress  from  1823 
to  1825.  He  was  a  descendant  of  William  Frost,  who  was 
living  in  Southold,  Long  Island,  as  early  as  1655,  and 
Rebecca,  daughter  of  Nicholas  and  Anne  (Beaupre) 
Wright  Frost.  Many  historians  claim  that  when  Capt. 
John  Underbill,  in  1633,  purchased  from  the  Indians  that 
part  of  Oyster  Bay  known  as  Matinecock,  William  Frost 
and  his  brother,  John,  were  associated  with  him.  Milton 
Frost's  maternal  grandparents  were  Adonijah  and  Mary 
(Haight)   Cocks,  of  Cortland. 

I  He  entered  Yale  in  1857  from  the  Peekskill  (N.  Y.) 
Military  Academy,  and  took  his  degree  four  years  later. 
He  then  read  law  in  the  office  of  Edward  Wells  (B.A. 
1839)  of  Peekskill,  and  was  in  due  time  admitted  to  the 
bar.  Taking  up  his  residence  in  Peekskill,  he  taught  Latin 
for  some  years  in  the  Peekskill  Military  Academy.  On 
April  17,  1863,  he  was  appointed  collector  of  internal 
revenue  at  Peekskill,  and  held  the  position  until  the  Peeks- 
kill  office  was  discontinued,  in  1870,  by  reason  of  the  aboli- 
tion of  the  war  taxes  for  which  it  had  been  established. 


40  YALE    COLLEGE 

During  the  two  years  following,  he  edited  the  Peekskill 
Messenger,  the  Republican  newspaper  of  the  town.  In 
1873,  he  became  connected  with  the  law  department  of  the 
Equitable  Life  Assurance  Company  of  New  York,  continu- 
ing in  this  relation  about  ten  years.  From  1885  to  1900, 
he  was  associated  with  his  brother,  Orrin  Frost,  in  the 
manufacture  of  Hudson  River  brick.  In  the  latter  year,  this 
business  was  discontinued.  From  this  time  on,  failing 
health  brought  about  a  gradual  lessening  of  activity. 

Mr.  Frost  was  a  member  of  the  Second  Presbyterian 
Church  of  Peekskill,  and  held  the  office  of  ruling  elder  in 
the  church  from  June,  1876,  till  the  close  of  his  life.  In 
this  position,  he  served  as  clerk  of  the  session  from  1886 
to  191 5.  He  was  assistant  superintendent  of  the  Sunday 
school  from  1874  to  1877,  and  superintendent  from  1877  to 
1887,  with  the  exception  of  one  year. 

His  death  occurred  December  6,  191 5,  at  his  home  in 
Peekskill,  after  an  illness  of  two  months.  He  was  buried 
in  Hillside  Cemetery  in  that  city. 

He  was  married  in  Peekskill,  July  20,  1864,  to  Julia 
Montgomery,  daughter  of  Albert  and  Emma  Louise  (Has- 
sert)  Wells  and  sister  of  Henry  Albert  Wells  (B.A.  1858). 
Mrs.  Frost  died  July  19,  1883.  Their  oldest  child,  John 
Wells,  died  May  5,  1885.  Two  daughters,  Emma  Mont- 
gomery and  Anne  Milton  (Mrs.  Thomas  Chalmers  Straus), 
and  a  son,  Henry  Laurence,  all  living  in  Peekskill,  survive 
him. 


Harvey  Sheldon  Kitchel,  B.A.   1861 

Born  August  12,  1839,  at  Plymouth  Hollow  (now  Thomaston),  Conn. 
Died  October  12,  1915,  in  Bethlehem,  Pa. 

Harvey  Sheldon  Kitchel  was  born  at  Plymouth  Hollow 
(now  Thomaston),  Conn.,  August  12,  1839.  He  was  the 
oldest  of  the  six  sons  of  Rev.  Harvey  Denison  Kitchel  and 
Ann  Smith  (Sheldon)  Kitchel  and  the  grandson  of  Jonathan 
Kitchel,  a  non-graduate  member  of  the  Class  of  1809  at 
Middlebury  College,  and  Caroline  (Holley)  Kitchel.  His 
mother's  parents  were  David  and  Jerusha  (Smith)  Sheldon. 
His  father  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  from  Middlebury 
College  in    1835,  and   later   studied   theology   at   Andover 


I 


I  I86I  41 

Theological  Seminary  and  at  Yale;  after  serving  in  the 
Congregational  ministry  for  twenty-eight  years,  he  became 
in  1866  president  of  Middlebury  College,  and  continued  in 
that  office  until  1873 ;  Middlebury  conferred  the  honorary 
degree  of  D.D.  upon  him  in  1858,  and  Yale  that  of  M.A. 
seven  years  later. 

After  studying  with  his  father,  Harvey  Sheldon  Kitchel 
completed  his  preparatory  training  at  Phillips  Academy, 
Andover,  Mass.,  in  1857.  He  entered  Yale  as  a  resident  of 
Detroit,  Mich.,  and  in  Sophomore  year  was  awarded  a 
Berkeley  premium  for  excellence  in  Latin  composition.  He 
received  Oration  appointments  in  Junior  and  Senior  years, 
and  was  elected  to  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 

From  the  fall  of  1861  until  1866,  he  resided  at  Williams- 
port,  Pa.,  at  first  while  serving  as  assistant  to  the  superin- 
tendent of  the  Catawissa  Railway  Company,  later  when 
employed  in  the  engineering  department  of  the  Pennsylvania 
Northern  Central  Railway,  and  then  while  engaged  in  sur- 
veying a  new  route  for  the  Atlantic  &  Great  Western  Rail- 
road. In  March,  1866,  he  moved  to  South  Bethlehem,  Pa., 
and  entered  the  service  of  the  Lehigh  Valley  Railroad,  with 
which  company  he  remained  for  more  than  thirty  years  as 
chief  clerk. 

He  changed  his  residence  in  1904  to  Bethlehem,  just 
across  the  Lehigh  River,  and  died  there  October  12,  191 5, 
after  a  brief  illness  from  pneumonia.  Burial  was  in  Niskey 
Hill  Cemetery  in  that  town. 

Mr.  Kitchel  was  a  member  of  the  Church  of  the  Nativity 
of  South  Bethlehem,  and  for  over  thirty  years  had  acted  as 
assistant  treasurer  of  the  Board  of  Missions  of  the  Protes- 
tant Episcopal  Diocese  of  Bethlehem.  Since  1900,  he  had 
served  as  assistant  treasurer  of  Lehigh  University. 

He  was  married  November  17,  1870,  in  South  Bethlehem 
to  Elizabeth  Kent,  daughter  of  William  and  Elizabeth  Kent 
(Sayre)  Reed  and  great-granddaughter  of  Solomon  Reed 
(B.A.  1775),  whose  father,  Solomon  Reed,  graduated  at 
Harvard  in  1739.  Mrs.  Kitchel  survives  her  husband  with 
four  children:  Robert  Reed,  who  received  the  degree  of 
M.E.  at  Lehigh  in  1892;  Anna  Sheldon  (B.A.  Smith  1895), 
now  Mrs.  John  Archibald  Bole  of  Wallkill,  N.  Y. ;  Harriet 
Tyrrell,  a  graduate  of  Smith  in  1905,  and  Margaret  Sheaffe. 
One  son,  Harvey  Denison,  died  in  1878,  a  daughter,  Gladys, 
in  1890,  and  another  son,  William  Sayre,  in   1896.     Mr. 


42  YALE    COLLEGE 

Kitchel  was  a  brother  of  Rev.  Cornelius  Ladd  Kitchel  (B.A. 
1862,  B.D.  1867)  ;  Courtney  Smith  Kitchel,  who  received 
the  degree  of  B.A.  at  Yale  in  1865  and  that  of  LL.B.  at 
the  Albany  Law  School  the  following  year,  and  Luther  Hart 
Kitchel,  a  member  of  the  College  Class  of  186.7,  who  took 
the  degree  of  M.D.  from  the  University  of  Buffalo  several 
years  after  his  graduation  from  Yale.  Another  brother, 
Stanley  Rice  Kitchel,  received  the  B.A.  degree  at  Williams 
in  1876,  having  previously  spent  some  time  as  a  member  of 
the  Class  of  1876  at  Middlebury.  Three  of  his  nephews  are 
also  graduates  of  Yale:  William  L.  Kitchel  (B.A.  1892, 
LL.B.  1895);  Cornelius  P.  Kitchel  (B.A.  1897,  LL.B. 
1901),  and  Allan  F.  Kitchel  (B.A.  1909). 


Lorenzo  Sears,  B.A.   1861 

Born  April  18,  1838,  in  Searsville,  Mass. 
Died  February  29,  1916,  in  Providence,  R.  I. 

Lorenzo  Sears,  son  of  Nathan  and  Cordelia  (Morton) 
Sears,  was  born  in  Searsville,  Mass.,  a  part  of  the  township 
of  Williamsburg,  April  18,  1838.  Through  his  father  he 
was  descended  from  Richard  Sears,  who  came  to  America 
in  1632 ;  his  earliest  maternal  ancestor  in  this  country  was 
George  Morton,  who  emigrated  from  England  and  whose 
son,  Nathaniel,  was  the  early  historian  of  Plymouth  Colony. 
He  was  also  a  descendant  of  Elder  Brewster,  Stephen  Hop- 
kins, and  Richard  Warren  of  the  Mayflozver  company.  He 
was  fitted  for  college  at  Williston  Seminary,  Easthampton, 
Mass.,  and  took  his  Freshman  year  at  Yale  with  the  Class 
of  i860.  He  joined  the  Class  with  which  he  was  graduated 
at  the  beginning  of  Sophomore  year. 

Upon  taking  his  degree,  he  entered  the  General  Theo- 
logical Seminary  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal  Church  in 
New  York  City,  and  was  graduated  there  in  June,  1864. 
Early  in  the  following  July,  he  was  ordained  as  deacon, 
and  in  October  took  charge  of  St.  Mark's  Church  at  Mystic, 
Conn.,  where  he  remained  for  a  year  and  a  half,  having  been 
ordained  to  the  priesthood  in  1865.  From  June,  1866,  until 
November,  1869,  he  served  as  rector  of  St.  Bartholomew's 
Church,  Providence,  R.  I.     His  next  parish  was  that  of 


i86i  43 

Grace  Church  at  Manchester,  N.  H.,  and  during  his  rector- 
ship of  sixteen  years  there  he  was  a  member  of  the  Stand- 
ing Committee  of  the  Diocese  of  New  Hampshire,  secretary 
and  treasurer  of  the  Diocesan  Board  of  Missions,  examin- 
ing chaplain  to  the  bishop,  and  deputy  to  the  General 
Convention. 

He  had  spent  much  time  in  the  study  of  rhetoric  and 
English  literature,  and  in  1885  left  the  ministry  (although 
continuing  to  preach  occasionally),  and  for  the  next  three 
years  held  the  professorship  of  rhetoric  and  English  litera- 
ture at  the  University  of  Vermont,  where  he  served  also 
as  librarian.  In  1890,  he  went  to  Brown  University  to 
accept  an  appointment  as  associate  professor  of  rhetoric. 
Five  years  later,  he  was  transferred  to  the  associate  profes- 
sorship of  American  literature,  and  acted  in  that  capacity 
until  1906,  when  he  resigned  to  devote  himself  to  literary 
work.  Among  his  books  are  "The  History  of  Oratory 
from  the  Age  of  Pericles  to  the  Present  Time"  (1896), 
**The  Occasional  Address :  Its  Literature  and  Composition" 
(1897),  "American  Literature  in  Its  Colonial  and  National 
Periods"  (1902),  "Wendell  Phillips,  Orator  and  Agitator" 
(1909),  "John  Hancock,  the  Picturesque  Patriot"  (1912), 
and  "John  Hay,  Author  and  Statesman"  (1914).  He  left 
in  manuscript  "Major  Joseph  Hawley  [B.A.  1742],  the 
Counsellor  of  Boston  Patriots"  and  "Rhode  Island's  Story," 
both  of  which  are  to  be  published.  In  1901,  he  wrote  the 
historical  introduction  to  the  "Library  of  Modern  Elo- 
quence." Professor  Sears  had  read  papers  before  various 
organizations,  and  was  a  frequent  contributor  to  periodicals. 
He  was  a  member  of  the  Authors  Club  of  London.  Trinity 
College  conferred  the  honorary  degree  of  M.A.  upon  him 
in  1887  and  that  of  L.H.D.  five  years  later. 

His  death  occurred  at  his  home  in  Providence,  February 
29,  19 16,  as  the  result  of  an  attack  of  pneumonia.  He  was 
buried  in  Swan  Point  Cemetery  in  that  city. 

Professor  Sears  was  married  in  Providence,  January  2, 
1866,  to  Adeline  A.,  daughter  of  James  T.  and  Sophie 
(Knight)  Harris,  who  survives  him  with  a  daughter,  Sophie 
Harris.    Another  daughter,  Sophie  Knight,  died  in  infancy. 


44  YALE    COLLEGE 


Charles  Thompson  Stanton,  B.A.   1861 

Born  November  30,  1839,  in  Stonington,  Conn. 
Died  November  26,  1915,  in  Stonington,  Conn. 

Charles  Thompson  Stanton  was  born  November  30,  1839, 
in  Stonington,  Conn.,  the  son  of  Charles  Thompson  Stanton, 
a  direct  descendant  of  John  Alden  and  Priscilla  Mullens, 
and  Nancy  Lord  (Palmer)  Stanton.  His  mother  was 
descended  from  Walter  Palmer  and  his  father  from  Thomas 
Stanton,  both  early  settlers  of  the  town  of  Stonington.  His 
uncle,  Capt.  Nathaniel  B.  Palmer,  was  the  discoverer  of 
Palmer's  Land  in  the  Antarctic  Circle. 

He  entered  Yale  in  1857,  having  been  fitted  for  college 
under  Dr.  David  Hart,  and  graduated  with  the  Class  of 
1861.  He  was  a  member  of  Linonia,  and  served  on  the 
Wooden  Spoon  Committee.  He  belonged  to  the  Nereid 
Boat  Club,  was  commodore  of  the  Yale  Navy,  and  rowed 
on  the  crew  of  1859,  the  first  Yale  crew  to  beat  Harvard, 
every  member  of  which  subsequently  served  with  distinction 
as  an  officer  in  the  Union  Army.  His  scholarship  appoint- 
ments were  a  Dispute  in  Junior  year  and  a  Colloquy  at 
Commencement. 

After  graduation,  Mr.  Stanton  spent  a  year  at  home,  and 
then,  in  the  summer  of  1862,  personally  recruited  Company 
E  of  the  Twenty-first  Connecticut  Volunteers,  and  was 
commissioned  captain  and  later  major.  He  was  wounded 
at  Drury's  Blufif,  May  16,  1864,  and  later  was  brevetted 
lieutenant  colonel  for  distinguished  bravery  on  the  field  of 
battle.  After  the  war,  he  interested  himself  in  the  organiza- 
tion of  the  National  Guard,  and  served  as  adjutant  general 
for  Connecticut  during  Governor  Hawley's  term  of  office. 
From  1869  to  1885,  he  was  engaged  in  sugar  raising  in 
Louisiana,  not  far  from  New  Orleans.  Returning  to  Con- 
necticut, he  was,  in  1891,  appointed  collector  of  the  port  of 
Stonington  (for  many  years  a  shipping  center  of  impor- 
tance), which  office  he  filled,  with  the  exception  of  the 
period  of  President  Cleveland's  administration,  until  its 
abolishment  in  191 3.  Colonel  Stanton  had  always  taken  a 
deep  interest  and  active  part  in  all  civic  and  church  affairs, 
and  was  long  a  member  of  the  official  board  of  the  Second 
Congregational  Church  of  Stonington,  of  which  he  had 
been  senior  deacon  for  the  past  twelve  years. 


1861-1862  45 

He  had  suffered  from  heart  trouble  for  some  time,  but 
his  death  at  his  home  in  Stonington,  November  26,  191 5, 
was  unexpected.  He  was  buried  in  the  cemetery  in  that 
town. 

He  had  never  married.  Two  of  his  three  surviving 
sisters  married  Yale  men — one  being  the  wife  of  Edward 
F.  Finney  (Ph.B.  1868)  and  the  other  of  the  late  George 
A.  Adee  (B.A.  1867,  LL.B.  Columbia  1870),  whose  sons 
were  George  Townsend  Adee  (B.A.  1895)  and  Charles 
Stanton  Adee,  a  non-graduate  member  of  the  Class  of  1897. 


Henry  Samuel  Barnum,  B.A.   1862 

Born  August  13,  1837,  in  Stratford,  Conn, 
Died  December  10,  1915,  in  Verona,  N.  J. 

Henry  Samuel  Barnum  was  born  August  13,  1837,  in 
Stratford,  Conn.,  the  son  of  Samuel  Barnum,  a  mechanic, 
and  Harriet  (Curtis)  Barnum.  His  father  was  the  son  of 
Mathew  and  Mary  (Starr)  Barnum  and  a  descendant  of 
Thomas  Barnum,  who  came  to  this  country  from  England 
about  1645  and  a  number  of  years  later  settled  at  Danbury, 
Conn.  His  mother,  whose  parents  were  Isaac  Jackson  and 
Charity  (Booth)  Curtis,  was  descended  from  William 
Curtis,  an  Englishman,  who  settled  at  Stratford  in  1639. 

His  preparatory  training  was  received  at  Stratford  Acad- 
emy, and  before  entering  Yale  in  1858,  he  spent  three  years 
as  clerk  in  the  store  of  his  uncle,  Mr.  M.  S.  Barnum,  at 
Farrandsville,  Pa.  He  received  Oration  appointments  in 
college,  ranking  seventh  in  his  Class  at  graduation,  and  was 
a  member  of  Brothers  in  Unity  and  of  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 

He  entered  Auburn  Theological  Seminary  in  1864,  having 
taught  during  the  two  previous  years  in  Guilford,  Conn., 
and  in  Poughkeepsie,  N.  Y.  He  preached  each  summer  of 
his  Seminary  course,  and  in  July,  1867,  directly  after  his 
graduation,  sailed  -for  Turkey  as  a  missionary  under  the 
American  Board  of  Commissioners  for  Foreign  Missions. 
Until  1872,  he  was  stationed  at  Harpoot  in  Asia  Minor, 
reached  by  a  horseback  journey  of  three  hundred  and  sixty 
miles  from  Samsun  on  the  Black  Sea,  and  during  this 
period,  while  learning  the  Armenian  language,  he  taught 


46  YALE    COLLEGE 

in  the  theological  seminary  and  did  much  work  among  the 
villagers.  He  joined  with  two  missionary  colleagues  in  1872 
in  establishing  a  new  station  in  the  city  of  Van,  where  he 
worked  steadily  until  his  return  to  America  in  1883.  His 
furlough  was  spent  in  visiting,  teaching,  and  preaching, 
principally  at  Gladstone,  N.  Dak.  He  went  back  to  Turkey 
in  the  latter  part  of  1884.  His  work  from  that  time  was 
chieflfy  carried  on  at  Constantinople,  and  largely  through 
the  press.  For  many  years,  he  edited  a  paper  in  the  Arme- 
nian and  Turkish  languages,  and  he  was  the  author  of  a 
commentary  in  the  former  tongue  on  several  of  the  epistles 
of  St.  Paul.  In  191 5,  the  complications  of  war  obliged  his 
paper  to  suspend  publication,  and  after  spending  some 
months  in  teaching  at  a  girls'  school,  he  returned  to 
America.  Other  journeys  to  this  country  had  been  made 
by  Mr.  Barnum  in  1897,  1907,  and  1912,  and  in  1898  Yale 
had  conferred  the  honorary  degree  of  Doctor  of  Divinity 
upon  him. 

His  death  occurred  in  Verona,  N.  J.,  December  10,  1915, 
after  an  illness  of  six  days  due  to  pneumonia.  He  was 
buried  in  Union  Cemetery  at  Stratford. 

Dr.  Barnum  was  first  married  May  22,  1867,  in  Guilford 
to  Lucretia  Linsley  Parker,  who  died  December  31  of  the 
same  year.  On  March  10,  1869,  he  was  married  in  Norwalk, 
Conn.,  to  Helen,  daughter  of  George  and  Caroline  (Louns- 
bury)  Randle.  Her  death  occurred  January  31,  1914,  and 
on  November  3,  191 5,  Dr.  Barnum's  third  marriage  took 
place  in  Verona,  N.  J.,  to  Mrs.  Christine  Curtis  Fish,  daugh- 
ter of  Sidney  and  Christana  (Demarest)  Curtis  and  widow 
of  George  Fish,  who  survives  him.  By  his  first  marriage, 
Dr.  Barnum  had  a  daughter,  who  died  shortly  after  birth. 
Five  children  by  his  second  marriage  died  before  reaching 
maturity — George  Scott  in  1875 ;  Clara  Louise  in  1877,  and 
Harriet  Starr,  Sarah  Randle,  and  Helen  Curtis,  all  in 
December,  1881.  One  son  by  this  marriage — Harry  Hunt- 
ington (B.A.  Amherst  1900,  M.A.  University  of  Chicago 
1909) — is  living. 


i862  47 


John  Phelps  Taylor,  B.A.   1862 

Born  April  6,  1841,  in  Andover,  Mass. 
Died  September  13,  1915,  in  Andover,  Mass. 

John  Phelps  Taylor  was  born  April  6,  1841,  in  Andover, 
Mass.,  his  father,  Rev.  John  Lord  Taylor,  D.D.  (B.A. 
1835),  ^^  that  time  holding  the  pastorate  of  the  South 
Church  in  that  town.  Dr.  Taylor,  who  was  later  identified 
with  Andover  Theological  Seminary,  as  treasurer  and  a 
professor,  was  the  son  of  John  and  Anna  (Beardsley) 
Taylor.  He  married  Caroline  Lord,  daughter  of  Col. 
Epaphras  Lord  Phelps  and  Elizabeth  (Holkins)  Phelps  and 
a  descendant  of  William  Phelps,  who  came  to  this  country 
from  Tewsbury,  England,  landing  at  Nantasket  (Hull), 
May  30,  1630,  and  later  settling  at  East  Windsor,  Conn-. ;  of 
Thomas  Lord  of  Hartford,  Conn. ;  and  of  Peter  Bulkeley, 
the  earliest  minister  at  Concord,  Mass. 

The  son  entered  Yale  from  Phillips  Academy,  Andover, 
being  valedictorian  of  both  his  preparatory  school  and  col- 
lege classes.  He  held  the  Woolsey  and  Clark  scholarships 
at  Yale,  received  several  prizes  in  Latin  and  English  com- 
position and  in  declamation  and  an  election  to  Phi  Beta 
Kappa,  and  was  on  the  editorial  board  of  the  Yale  Literary 
Magazine. 

In  the  fall  after  his  graduation,  Mr.  Taylor  returned  to 
New  Haven,  and  for  a  year  was  engaged  in  reading  history, 
giving  private  instruction,  and  serving  as  librarian  of  Lin- 
onia.  In  1865,  after  two  years  of  European  travel  and 
study,  he  entered  Andover  Theological  Seminary,  where  he 
was  graduated  in  1868.  During  his  Seminary  course,  he 
spent  six  months  in  Europe  and  the  Holy  Land,  and,  in 
1866-67,  taught  at  Phillips  Academy.  Being  ordained  at 
Middletown,  Conn.,  November  12,  1868,  he  held  for  the  next 
six  years  the  pastorate  of  the  South  Congregational  Church 
of  that  place.  From  1874  to  1876,  he  was  in  charge  of  the 
United  Congregational  Church  at  Newport,  R.  I.  The  year 
of  1877  he  spent  in  Andover,  studying  Hebrew.  He 
accepted  a  call  to  New  London,  Conn.,  in  1878,  and  for  the 
next  five  years  served  as  pastor  of  the  Second  Congrega- 
tional Church. 

From  1883  until  1899,  Mr.  Taylor  was  the  Taylor  profes- 
sor of  Biblical  theology  at  Andover  Theological  Seminary, 


48  YALE    COLLEGE 

his  subjects  being  in  reality  Biblical  history  and  Oriental 
archaeology.  With  his  colleagues,  he  had  served  as  preacher 
at  the  Seminary  Chapel,  and  during  the  life  of  the  Andover 
Review,  he  was  responsible  for  its  "Archaeological  Notes." 
In  1885,  he  was  lecturer  on  Egyptology  at  the  Peabody 
Institute  in  Baltimore.  From  1882  to  1892,  he  was  a  direc- 
tor of  the  American  Oriental  Society,  and  since  the  latter 
year  he  had  been  a  trustee  of  Abbot  Academy  at  Andover. 
He  had  taken  a  deep  interest  in  local  history  and  town 
affairs,  being  a  generous  supporter  of  Andover's  varied 
philanthropies.  At  the  time  of  the  Two  Hundred  and 
Fiftieth  Anniversary  of  Andover,  he  was  a  member  of  the 
general  committee  of  fifteen  which  had  charge  of  the  cele- 
bration. Middlebury  College  conferred  the  honorary  degree 
of  D.D.  upon  Professor  Taylor  in  1897.  He  was  one  of 
the  first  members  of  the  Boston  Yale  Club. 

After  his  retirement,  he  devoted  himself  to  study  and 
travel  and  to  the  interests  of  Phillips  Academy,  of  whose 
General  Alumni  Association  he  was  president  in  1912-13. 
Since  January,  191 5,  his  health  had  been  failing,  and  he 
died  in  Andover,  September  13  of  that  year,  shortly  after 
returning  from  Watch  Hill,  R.  I.,  where  he  had  passed  the 
summer.    Burial  was  in  Evergreen  Cemetery,  New  Haven. 

Professor  Taylor  was  married  in  New  Haven,  October 
14,  1868,  to  Antoinette,  daughter  of  Nathan  Fenn  and  Emily 
Grace  (Isbell)  Hall,  both  descendants  of  the  first  settlers 
of  Milford,  Conn.     She  survives  him  without  children. 


Frederick  Jones  Barnard,  B.A.   1863 

Born  August  24,  1841,  in  Worcester,  Mass. 
Died  October  11,  1915,  in  Worcester,  Mass. 

Frederick  Jones  Barnard  was  born  in  Worcester,  Mass., 
August  24,  1 84 1,  the  son  of  Ebenezer  Lovell  and  Caro- 
line (Sweetser)  Barnard.  He  received  his  preparation  for 
college  in  his  native  town.  His  scholarship  appointments 
at  Yale  were  a  Dissertation  in  Junior  year  and  a  Dispute 
the  following  year.  He  spoke  at  Junior  Exhibition  and  at 
Commencement,  and  was  a  member  of  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 

After  spending  some  time  in  Worcester  studying  law  in 
the  office  of  Mr.  Peter  C.  Bacon  and  several  months  in  the 


I 862-1 863  49 

field  as  a  member  of  Company  F,  Sixtieth  Massachusetts 
Infantry,  Mr.  Barnard  entered  the  Harvard  Law  School, 
where  he  was  graduated  with  the  degree  of  LL.B.  in  i866. 
From  that  time  until  the  failure  of  his  health,  he  practiced 
law  in  Worcester,  for  some  years  being  connected  with  the 
firm  of  Bacon  &  Aldrich.  He  served  as  register  in  bank- 
ruptcy for  a  time,  resuming  his  private  practice  upon  the 
abolishment  of  that  office. 

Mr.  Barnard  died  October  ii,  1915,  in  Worcester,  Mass., 
after  a  prolonged  illness  resulting  from  a  series  of  apoplec- 
tic shocks,  and  was  buried  in  Rural  Cemetery. 

He  was  married  in  May,  1875,  to  Anna  Colburn,  daugh- 
ter of  Rev.  Burritt  Augustus  Smith,  a  graduate  of  the 
College  in  1843,  ^^^^  Mary  G.  (Colburn)  Smith  and  half- 
sister  of  Herbert  A.  Smith  (B.A.  1889,  Ph.D.  1897).  Four 
children  were  born  to  them :  Ruth  Colburn  (Mrs.  Alexander 
Bowler);  Frederick  Jones,  who  died  in  infancy;  Anna 
Dawes,  and  Frederick  Merriman,  a  graduate  of  Harvard 
with  the  degree  of  B.A.  in  1910. 


Cyrus  West  Francis,  B.A.   1863 

Born  June  17,  1838,  in  Newington,  Conn. 
Died  June  12,  1916,  in  Hartford,  Conn. 

Cyrus  West  Francis,  whose  parents  were  Cyrus  Francis, 
a  farmer,  and  Nancy  Dor  ranee  (Pratt)  Francis,  was  born 
in  Newington  (then  a  part  of  Wethersfield),  Conn.,  June  17, 
1838.  Through  his  father,  who  was  the  son  of  Major 
Justus  Francis  and  Mary  (Belden)  Francis,  he  was 
descended  from  Robert  Francis,  who  came  to  this  country 
between  1640  and  1660  and  settled  at  Wethersfield.  The 
most  important  and  influential  of  the  Connecticut  members 
of  this  family  was  probably  Major  Francis,  who  served  in 
the  Revolutionary  War.  He  was  born  in  1750,  and  died 
in  1827. 

Entering  Yale  College  in  1859,  from  Dummer  Academy, 
South  Byfield,  Mass.,  where  he  was  valedictorian  of  his 
class,  Cyrus  W.  Francis  received  a  third  prize  in  English 
composition  in  Sophomore  year.  Oration  appointments,  and 
an  election  to  Phi  Beta  Kappa.  He  was  an  editor  of  the  Yale 
Literary  Magazine  and  a  deacon  in  the  College  Church. 


50  YALE  COLLEGE 

He  began  his  preparation  for  the  ministry  in  the  Theo- 
logical Department  at  Yale  in  the  fall  after  receiving  his 
Bachelor's  degree,  took  the  full  divinity  course  and  also 
a  fourth  year,  and  in  1867  was  graduated  with  the  degree 
of  B.D. 

He  served  in  the  Christian  Commission  two  terms  in 
1864-65,  was  licensed  to  preach  May  30,  1865,  and  ordained 
as  a  missionary  September  12,  1867.  Early  in  the  follow- 
ing month,  he  left  for  Atlanta,  Ga.,  where,  under  the 
auspices  of  the  American  Missionary  Association,  he  was 
engaged  in  educational  and  religious  work  among  the 
Negroes.  In  March,  1869,  he  was  installed  as  pastor  of  the 
First  Congregational  Church  of  Atlanta,  but  resigned  that 
charge  four  years  later  because  of  the  illness  of  his  wife, 
with  whom  he  spent  several  months  in  California,  where 
she  died.  He  returned  to  Georgia  in  September,  1873,  to 
accept  the  professorship  of  systematic  theology  in  Atlanta 
University,  of  which  he  was  one  of  the  trustees  for  the 
twenty-seven  years  following  the  date  of  its  charter  in  1867. 
He  was  transferred  to  the  professorship  of  ethics  and  Chris- 
tian evidences  in  1874,  and  held  that  chair  until  June,  1894. 
For  thirteen  years,  he  also  served  as  librarian  there,  and 
for  twenty  years  was  in  charge  of  the  religious  interests 
of  the  institution  as  pastor  of  the  College  Church. 
For  a  year,  he  served  as  acting  president.  In  his  work 
in  Georgia,  Mr.  Francis  was  intimately  associated  with 
two  of  his  classmates  of  the  Class  of  1863,  Edmund  A. 
Ware,  the  first  president  of  Atlanta  University,  and  Horace 
Bumstead,  its  second  president;  and  also,  from  his  child- 
hood, with  the  third  and  present  president,  son  of  the  first, 
Edward  T.  Ware  (B.A.  1897),  at  whose  ordination  to  the 
ministry  he  oflficiated. 

After  leaving  Atlanta  in  1894,  he  became,  in  1895,  pastor 
of  the  Congregational  Church  at  Brookfield,  Conn.,  con- 
tinuing there  until  1904.  The  remainder  of  his  life  was 
passed  in  Hartford,  Conn.,  the  condition  of  his  health  being 
such  that  he  was  unable  to  engage  in  the  active  work  of 
the  ministry.  He  died  in  that  city,  June  12,  1916,  as  the 
result  of  arterio  sclerosis.  Burial  was  in  the  Newington 
Cemetery.  Mr.  Francis  was  at  his  death  a  member  of  the 
Fourth  Congregational  Church  of  Hartford,  of  which  he 
was  at  one  time  a  deacon. 


i863  5i 

He  was  married  in  New  Haven,  Conn.,  September  24, 
1867,  to  Hattie  Minor,  whose  death  occurred  April  22, 
1873.  On  January  31,  1894,  his  second  marriage  took 
place  in  Fall  River,  Mass.,  to  Ida  F.,  daughter  of  Joseph 
Church  and  Susan  (Gunn)  Terry,  who  survives  him  with 
two  sons, — Dwight  Terry,  now  a  cadet  at  the  West  Point 
Military  Academy,  and  Alfred  West,  a  member  of  the  Class 
of  191 7  at  the  Worcester  Polytechnic  Institute. 


Edward  Brodie  Glasgow,  B.A.   1863 

Born  March  9,  1843,  in  Philadelphia,  Pa. 
Died  October  15,  1915,  in  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

Edward  Brodie  Glasgow,  son  of  William  and  Mary 
(Brodie)  Glasgow,  was  born  in  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  March 
9,  1843.  His  parents  removed  to  Warminster,  Pa.,  in  that 
year,  and  he  was  brought  up  on  a  farm  there.  He  was 
fitted  for  college  at  the  Tennant  School,  in  the  neighboring 
town  of  Hartsville,  and  entered  Yale  as  a  Sophomore  in 
i860.  He  was  graduated  in  1863  with  Phi  Beta  Kappa 
rank,  having  received  Oration  appointments. 

The  first  few  years  after  taking  his  degree  he  spent  in 
teaching — at  first  at  the  Pennsylvania  Military  Academy, 
then  at  the  Eaglewood  Military  Academy,  and  finally  at  the 
Highland  Military  Academy  at  Worcester,  Mass.,  of  which 
he  was  commandant  for  several  years.  During  this  period, 
he  studied  law,  and,  having  completed  his  course  at  the 
Columbia  Law  School,  was  in  1870  admitted  to  the  bar. 
Shortly  afterwards,  a  difficulty  with  his  eyes  developed,  and 
he  was  obliged  to  spend  about  fifteen  months  at  his  home  in 
Warminster.  Returning  to  Worcester,  he  engaged  in  the 
practice  of  law.  In  1876,  he  was  appointed  an  inspector 
in  the  state  militia,  receiving  a  commission  as  lieutenant 
colonel.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Massachusetts  House  of 
Representatives  in  1889  and  1890,  and  in  1892  was  chosen 
as  a  presidential  elector,  serving  as  secretary  of  the  elec- 
toral college  at  its  session  the  following  January.  He  was 
a  trustee  of  the  Worcester  Free  Public  Library,  and  had 
served  on  the  School  Board  and  as  secretary  of  the 
Worcester  Indian  Rights  Association  and  the  Worcester  Art 
Society.     He  belonged  to  the  Massachusetts  Civil  Service 


52  YALE    COLLEGE 

Association,  and  at  one  time  held  office  as  secretary  of  the 
Yale  Alumni  Association  of  Western  Massachusetts.  He 
attended  the  Second  Unitarian  Church  in  Worcester,  and 
was  a  life  member  of  the  American  Unitarian  Association. 
He  had  written  somewhat  for  the  press,  and  was  the  author 
of  a  sketch  of  the  history  of  Worcester. 

In  the  fall  of  191 5,  Mr.  Glasgow  went  to  Philadelphia, 
as  his  mental  condition  had  become  such  that  it  was  thought 
best  for  him  to  be  with  relatives  there,  and  he  took  his  life 
in  that  city  on  October  15.     He  was  unmarried. 


Charles  Upham  Shepard,  B.A.   1863 

Born  October  4,  1842,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  July  4,  1915,  in  Summerville,  S.  C. 

Charles  Upham  Shepard  was  born  in  New  Haven,  Conn., 
on  October  4,  1842,  being  the  only  son  of  Charles  Upham 
and  Harriet  (Taylor)  Shepard  and  a  descendant  of  Thomas 
Shepard,  who  came  to  this  country  from  England  early  in 
the  seventeenth  century,  settling  at  Maiden,  Mass.  His 
father,  a  graduate  of  Amherst  in  1824,  received  an  honorary 
M.D.  from  Dartmouth  in  1836  and  an  LL.D.  from  Amherst 
in  1857.  From  1830  to  1847,  he  served  as  a  lecturer  in 
chemistry  at  Yale,  where  he  had  previously  held  an  appoint- 
ment for  several  years  as  assistant  in  chemistry,  and  he 
later  was  a  full  professor  on  the  Faculties  of  Amherst  and 
the  Medical  College  of  South  Carolina,  and  served  as  state 
chemist  of  Connecticut  and  South  Carolina.  He  was  best 
known  as  a  geologist  and  mineralogist.  He  was  the  author 
of  an  early  text  book,  was  associated  with  James  Gates 
Percival  (B.A.  181 5,  M.D.  1820)  in  a  geological  survey  of 
Connecticut,  and  had  one  of  the  largest  collections  of  min- 
erals and  meteorites  in  the  country,  part  of  which  remains 
on  exhibition  at  the  United  States  National  Museum.  He 
was  the  son  of  Rev.  Mase  Shepard,  D.D.,  and  a  first  cousin 
of  Ralph  Waldo  Emerson. 

Charles  U.  Shepard,  Jr.,  prepared  for  college  at  Skinner's 
School  in  New  Haven,  and  later  at  Phillips  Academy, 
Andover,  Mass.,  from  which  he  graduated  in  1859.  He 
entered  Yale  that  same  year,  and  immediately  after  gradu- 


i863  '  53 

ating  went  abroad,  and  for  the  next  four  years  devoted  him- 
self to  the  study  of  medicine  and  fjhysiological  chemistry, 
receiving  the  degree  of  M.D.,  with  honors,  from  the  Uni- 
versity of  Gottingen  in  1867.  While  still  a  student,  he 
served  with  distinction  as  a  volunteer  surgeon  in  the 
Hanoverian  Army  in  the  Austro-Prussian  War  of  1866. 
He  was  in  charge  of  a  field  hospital,  and  worked  under  fire. 
Dr.  Shepard  was  offered  the  decoration  of  the  Second  Class 
of  the  Order  of  the  Red  Eagle,  which  was,  however, 
declined,  following  his  father's  example  in  refusing  Euro- 
pean decorations. 

While  abroad.  Dr.  Shepard  published,  in  collaboration 
with  Professor  George  Meissner,  "The  Origin  of  Hippuric 
Acid  in  the  Animal  Organism."  He  returned  to  America 
in  1867,  going  to  Charleston,  S.  C,  to  accept  the  position 
of  assistant  professor  of  chemistry  in  the  Medical  College 
of  South  Carolina,  succeeding  his  father,  where  he  con- 
tinued until  1885,  having  been  raised  to  a  full  professorship 
in  1870. 

The  development  of  the  phosphate  industry  in  the  state, 
founded  by  his  father,  turned  his  attention  from  animal  to 
vegetable  chemistry.  He  was  never  connected  directly  with 
any  of  the  industrial  concerns  springing  out  of  the  growth 
of  this  industry,  preferring  to  refrain  from  making  any 
particular  attachments  of  this  kind  for  fear  that  they  might 
interfere  with  his  larger  usefulness  to  the  phosphate  indus- 
try generally.  His  work  in  the  phosphate  beds  began 
shortly  after  his  retirement  from  the  Faculty  of  the  Medical 
College.  He  established  the  first  complete  laboratory  (.the 
present  Shepard  Laboratory  of  Charleston)  to  be  used  for 
the  upbuilding  of  the  phosphate  industry.  He  explored  the 
phosphate  beds  of  all  the  South  Carolina  rivers  producing 
this  rock,  and  made  the  map  of  the  phosphate  regions  of 
the  state  which  is  now  used  by  the  United  States  Govern- 
ment, and  furnished  by  it  as  authoritative.  He  examined 
during  his  services  in  behalf  of  this  industry  practically  all 
phosphate  deposits  in  the  state.  Dr.  Shepard's  work  in  this 
region  spread  his  reputation  abroad,  and  he  spent  a  number 
of  years  in  doing  similar  work  in  Europe,  becoming  widely 
known  in  the  countries  of  that  continent.  At  times,  he  made 
investigations  of  phosphate  deposits  in  Canada. 

Since  about  1890,  he  had  been  chiefly  interested  in  the 
production  of   tea,   being  the   first  person   to   successfully 


54  YALE    COLLEGE 

engage  in  this  industry  in  the  United  States.  His  efforts 
in  this  direction  aroused  interest  all  over  the  country,  and 
his  plantation,  "Pinehurst,"  at  Summerville,  S.  C,  had 
become  widely  known,  both  on  account  of  the  tea  farm  and 
its  beautiful  gardens.  Dr.  Shepard  was  gradually  enabled 
to  raise  and  sell  between  10,000  and  15,000  pounds  of  tea 
annually.  He  had  written  extensively  on  the  possibilities  of 
raising  tea  in  this  country,  and  many  of  his  articles  were 
printed  in  magazines  and  newspapers.  He  had  also,  since 
about  1889,  been  largely  identified  with  the  exploitation  and 
development  of  the  Florida  hard  rock  industry.  Dr.  Shep- 
ard's  aid  had  been  given  to  the  betterment  of  conditions 
among  the  poor-whites  and  Negroes  in  the  community;  he 
was  a  supporter  of  the  Shepard  School  at  St.  Barnabas' 
Mission  for  the  former,  and  the  Pinehurst  School  for  the 
latter.  He  had  served  for  many  years  as  senior  warden  of 
St.  Paul's  Protestant  Episcopal  Church  at  Summerville. 

He  died  on  his  plantation,  "Pinehurst,"  on  July  4,  1915. 
The  interment  was  with  his  wife's  family  in  Greenwood 
Cemetery  in  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 

His  marriage  took  place  in  Brooklyn,  on  January  17, 
1872,  to  Ellen,  daughter  of  James  Humphrey,  a  member  of 
Congress,  and  Urania  (Battell)  Humphrey,  who  died  on 
February  25,  1874.  One  child,  a  girl,  died  in  infancy.  Mrs. 
Shepard  was  the  niece  of  Joseph  Battell,  after  whom  the 
Battell  Chapel  at  Yale  is  named,  and  she  was  the  sister  of 
the  first  wife  of  Clarence  Deming  (B.A.  1872).  In  her 
memory.  Dr.  Shepard  gave  the  altar  window  to  the  Chapel 
of  .  the  Congregational  Church  at  Norfolk,  Conn.  Dr. 
Shepard  had  two  sisters,  one,  Harriet  Silliman  Shepard, 
marrying  the  late  John  W.  DeForest,  the  historian  and 
novelist,  upon  whom  Amherst  conferred  an  honorary  M.A. 
in  1859,  and  who  served  as  major  of  volunteers  during  the 
Civil  War.  Their  son  was  Louis  Shepard  DeForest  (B.A. 
1879),  who  received  the  degree  of  M.D.  from  the  Univer- 
sity of  Jena  in  1885  and  that  of  M.A.  from  Yale  in  1891. 
The  other  sister,  Fanny  Boltwood  Shepard,  married  the 
late  Charles  Pinkney  James,  LL.D.  (B.A.  Harvard  1838), 
justice  of  the  Supreme  Court  of  the  District  of  Columbia. 


i863  55 


Hamilton  Wallis,  B.A.  1863 

Born  November  25,  1842,  in  New  York  City 
Died  April  i,  1916,  in  Orange,  N.  J. 

Hamilton  Wallis,  son  of  Alexander  Hamilton  and  Eliza- 
beth (Geib)  Wallis,  was  born  November  25,  1842,  in  New 
York  City,  being  a  descendant  of  Joseph  Wallis,  who  came 
from  London  to  New  York  about  1776.  His  paternal 
grandparents  were  John  and  Mary  Ann  (Geib)  Wallis,  and 
his  mother,  a  cousin  of  her  husband,  was  the  daughter  of 
John  and  Margaret  (Lawrence)  Geib.  The  founder  of  the 
Geib  family  in  this  country  was  John  Geib,  who  emigrated 
from  Germany  about  1800  and  settled  in  New  York  City. 

When  Hamilton  Wallis  was  four  years  of  age,  his  family 
moved  to  Jersey  City,  N.  J.,  and  he  received  his  early  educa- 
tion in  the  public  schools  of  that  city,  later  attending  a 
school  at  Bloomfield,  N.  J.,  and  the  Hasbrouck  Institute  in 
Jersey  City.  His  final  preparation  for  Yale  was  made 
under  Rev.  Samuel  Jones  in  Bridgeport,  Conn.  In  college, 
he  belonged  to  Linonia,  and  was  one  of  the  founders  of  the 
Glyuna  Boat  Club,  being  its  second  captain. 

In  the  fall  after  his  graduation  from  Yale,  he  took  up 
the  study  of  law  at  Columbia  University,  where  he  received 
an  LL.B.  in  1865.  He  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  May  of 
that  year,  and  then  spent  about  six  months  in  the  office  of 
Marsh,  Coe  &  Wallis  in  New  York  City  and  a  longer 
period  in  that  of  Scudder  &  Carter.  In  1866,  he 
formed,  with  William  G.  Wilson  (B.A.  Harvard  1862, 
LL.B.  Harvard  1864),  the  firm  of  Wilson.  &  Wallis,  with 
offices  in  New  York  City.  He  practiced  under  this  name 
until  the  death  of  his  fatiier  in  1879,  when  their  two  firms 
were  consolidated  under  the  name  of  Marsh,  Wilson  & 
Wallis.  In  1888,  on  the  retirement  of  Mr.  Marsh,  the  old 
title  of  Wilson  &  Wallis  was  resumed,  continuing  until 
1905,  when  Mr.  Wallis  retired  from  practice.  Since  that 
time,  he  had  lived  on  his  farm  at  Colchester,  Conn.,  his 
home  having  previously  been  in  East  Orange,  N.  J. 

In  addition  to  his  professional  interests  in  New  York, 
Mr.  Wallis  was  a  member  of  the  Jersey  City  firm  of  Wallis, 
Edwards  &  Bumstead,  his  associates  being  William  D. 
Edwards  (B.A.  New  York  University  1875,  LL.B.  Colum- 
bia   1878)    and   Mr.    William   G.    Bumstead.     For   twenty 


56  YALE  COLLEGE 

years,  he  was  one  of  the  trustees  of  the  Brick  Presbyterian 
Church  of  East  Orange,  serving  during  most  of  that  time 
as  president  of  the  board.  He  was  prominent  in  Masonic 
circles,  and  in  1879  and  1880  held  the  office  of  grand  master 
of  Masons  in  New  Jersey.  In  1879,  he  was  appointed  a 
director  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Jersey  City,  succeed- 
ing his  father,  its  former  president,  and  he  was  also  a 
director  of  the  United  Electrical  Company  of  New  Jersey, 
and  of  the  Jersey  City  Gas  Light  Company  (in  which  he 
served  successively  as  vice  president  and  president),  the 
Peoples  Gas  Light  Company  of  Jersey  City,  and  the  Hudson 
County  Gas  Light  Company  of  Hoboken,  N.  J.,  in  1899 
being  chosen,  on  the  merger  of  the  three  last-named  cor- 
porations, a  director  of  the  Hudson  County  Gas  Company. 
He  was  several  times  a  candidate  for  local  office,  and  fifteen 
years  ago  served  as  excise  commissioner  of  East  Orange. 
Mr.  Wallis  was  for  several  years  before  his  death  agent  for 
his  Class  of  the  Alumni  University  Fund,  and  while  he  had 
this  office  a  greater  proportion  of  the  living  members  of 
the  Class  were  contributors  to  the  Fund  than  of  any  earlier 
Class  and  many  later  ones. 

His  death  occurred  April  i,  1916,  in  the  Memorial  Hos- 
pital at  Orange,  N.  J.,  following  an  operation  for  malignant 
tumor,  and  he  was  buried  in  Rosedale  Cemetery,  East 
Orange. 

On  October  13,  1868,  Mr.  Wallis  was  married  to  Alice, 
daughter  of  Nathaniel  and  Emeline  (Graham)  Waldron  of 
Philadelphia,  Pa.,  who  died  December  9,  1899.  By  this 
marriage,  there  were  four  children:  Emeline  Waldron 
(Mrs.  James  Carr  Dunn  of  London,  England)  ;  Alexander 
Hamilton,  who  in  1895,  two  years  after  his  graduation  from 
Yale  College,  received  the  degree  of  LL.B,  at  the  New 
York  Law  School;  Nathaniel  Waldron  (B.A.  1897),  and 
Chnton  Geib,  a  graduate  of  the  Scientific  School  in  1897. 
Mrs.  Wallis'  nephew,  W.  Durrie  Waldron,  graduated  from 
the  College  in  1903,  receiving  an  LL.B.  from  the  New  York 
Law  School  in  1905.  Mr.  Wallis  was  married  a  second 
time,  June  29,  1905,  in  East  Orange  to  Josephine  Bell, 
daughter  of  Alfred  W.  and  Helen  (Graves)  Taylor,  by 
whom  he  had  a  son,  John,  and  a  daughter,  Helen  Elizabeth. 
Mrs.  Wallis  and  all  of  his  children  survive. 


863-1864  57 


Orson  Gregory  Dibble,  B.A.   1864 

Born  October  28,  1840,  in  Cortland,  N.  Y. 
Died  November  24,  1915,  in  Pompey,  N.  Y. 

Orson  Gregory  Dibble,  son  of  Horace  Dibble,  was  born 
in  Cortland,  N.  Y.,  October  28,  1840.  His  mother  was 
Emaline  A.,  daughter  of  Ichabod  and  Rachel  (Seward) 
Scranton.  He  joined  the  Class  of  1864  at  Yale  in  its  Sopho- 
more year,  having  prepared  at  Cortland  Academy.  He 
received  Oration  appointments,  was  elected  to  Phi  Beta 
Kappa,  and  was  one  of  the  Commencement  speakers. 

In  1868,  after  serving  for  several  years  as  principal  of 
Pompey  Academy,  he  took  up  the  study  of  medicine  at  New 
York  University,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with  the 
degree  of  M.D.  in  1869.  He  was  then  for  a  time  located 
at  McGrawville,  N.  Y.,  but  in  1870  removed  to  Pompey, 
where  he  practiced  his  profession,  and,  for  fifteen  years, 
served  as  health  officer.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Central 
New  York  Medical  Association,  the  Onondaga  County 
Medical  Association,  and  the  New  York  State  Medical 
Society. 

Since  1904,  Dr.  Dibble  had  suffered  from  paralysis,  which 
prevented  him  from  attending  to  his  practice,  and  finally 
caused  his  death  at  his  home  in  Pompey  on  November  24, 
191 5.    He  was  buried  in  the  Cortland  Rural  Cemetery. 

His  marriage  took  place  on  October  20,  1875,  in  Pompey 
to  Francis  A.,  daughter  of  Orlin  Jarvis  and  Sophronia 
Wheaton.  Mrs.  Dibble  died  July  29,  1898.  They  had  no 
children. 


Theodore  Weld  Hopkins,  B.A.   1864 

Born  January  6,  1841,  in  Cincinnati,  Ohio 
Died  January  23,  1916,  in  Rochester,  N.  Y. 

Theodore  Weld  Hopkins,  son  of  Augustus  Hopkins,  a 
business  man,  and  Mary  Cook  (Sumner)  Hopkins,  was 
born  in  Cincinnati,  Ohio,  January  6,  1841.  He  entered  the 
preparatory  department  at  Oberlin  in  1851,  remaining  six 
years,  and  then  from  1858  until  i860  studied  in  the  College 


58  YALE    COLLEGE 

there.  The  next  two  years  he  spent  in  private  study,  giving 
most  of  his  time  to  music,  and  in  the  fall  of  1862  he  joined 
the  Class  of  1864  at  Yale,  where  he  was  a  member  of  Lin- 
onia,  the  Varuna  Boat  Club,  and  Phi  Beta  Kappa ;  in  Senior 
year  he  received  a  High  Oration  appointment. 

Oberlin  granted  him  the  degree  of  B.A.  the  year  follow- 
ing his  graduation  from  Yale.  During  1864-65,  he  taught 
in  General  Russell's  Collegiate  and  Commercial  Institute 
in  New  Haven  and  at  the  Providence  Conference  Sem- 
inary at  East  Greenwich,  R.  I.  He  then  served  for 
five  years  as  assistant  principal  of  the  Central  High  School 
in  Cleveland,  Ohio.  In  1870,  he  entered  Rochester  Theo- 
logical Seminary,  where  he  was  graduated  in  1873.  For 
the  next  seven  years,  he  held  the  professorship  of  ecclesias- 
tical history  at  Chicago  Congregational  Theological  Semi- 
nary. During  this  period,  he  found  time  aside  from  his 
school  work  to  organize  the  Lawndale  Congregational 
Church  (now  known  as  the  Millard  Avenue  Church)  in 
Chicago,  and  was  ordained  to  the  Congregational  ministry 
on  the  occasion  of  the  recognition  of  the  church.  In  1873, 
he  had  been  licensed  to  preach  by  the  Rochester  Presbytery, 
and  in  1880  returned  to  Rochester,  where  from  that  time 
until  1887  he  served  as  pastor  of  the  Central  Presbyterian 
Church.  This  was  his  only  pastorate,  but  during  the  suc- 
ceeding years,  while  devoting  his  attention  chiefly  to  literary 
work  and  teaching,  he  preached  almost  continually  as  stated 
supply  for  various  churches.  He  served  as  acting  professor 
of  church  history  at  Rochester  Theological  Seminary  dur- 
ing the  year  of  1889-90,  and  from  1893  until  1895  was 
professor  of  ecclesiastical  history  and  church  polity  at 
Auburn  Theological  Seminary. 

His  death,  which  was  due  to  an  acute  attack  of  nephritis, 
occurred  at  his  home  in  Rochester,  January  23,  1916,  after 
an  illness  of  a  week.  He  had  for  years  been  a  suflferer  from 
arterio  sclerosis  and  nephritis.  He  was  buried  in  Mount 
Hope  Cemetery  in  Rochester,  For  some  time,  the  condition 
of  his  health  had  forced  him  into  complete  retirement,  and 
had  not  allowed  him  to  engage  in  any  work  except  writing. 
Among  the  articles  of  which  Professor  Hopkins  was  the 
author  were  several  on  the  Doctrine  of  Inspiration,  Com- 
parative Religion,  and  the  Development  of  Doctrine.  He 
organized  the  first  society  of  the  Young  People's  Society 
of  Christian  Endeavor  in  the  state  of  New  York  at  the 


i864  59 

Central    Presbyterian    Church,    where   he    also    founded   a 
branch  of  St.  Paul's  Brotherhood. 

He  had  never  married.     He  is  survived  by  a  sister,  with 
whom  he  had  made  his  home  for  a  long  time. 


William  Gaylord  Peck,  B.A.   1864 

Born  March  12,  1841,  in  Boston,  Mass. 
Died  June  18,  1916,  in  Arlington,  Mass. 

William  Gaylord  Peck  was  born  March  12,  1841,  in  Bos- 
ton, Mass.,  the  son  of  Abel  Gaylord  Peck,  whose  parents 
were  Sylvester  and  Angeline  (Ives)  Peck.  His  mother 
was  Eliza  Ann,  daughter  of  John  and  Persis  Boles. 

He  entered  Yale  from  Phillips  (Andover)  Academy, 
became  a  member  of  the  Varuna  Boat  Club  and  Brothers 
in  Unity  and  an  editor  of  the  Yale  Literary  Magazine,  and 
received  a  Colloquy  appointment  in  Junior  year  and  a  Dis- 
pute at  Commencement. 

Mr.  Peck  entered  the  real  estate  and  brokerage  business 
in  Boston  on  leaving  collfege,  soon  being  admitted  to  partner- 
ship with  his  father.  The  name  of  the  firm  was  then  A.  G. 
Peck  &  Son,  and  after  his  father's  death,  Mr.  Peck  con- 
ducted the  business  himself.  His  home  had  been  in  Arling- 
ton (formerly  West  Cambridge)  since  boyhood,  and  in 
1873  he  was  made  a  trustee  of  the  Arlington  Five  Cents 
Savings  Bank,  of  which  he  was  afterwards  vice  president, 
and,  for  thirty-five  years,  president.  He  was  a  member  of 
the  Board  of  Selectmen  of  Arlington  from  1874  to  1877,  of 
the  Board  of  Water  Commissioners  from  1878  to  1880,  and 
chairman  of  the  Board  of  Commissioners  of  the  Sinking 
Fund  from  1874.  He  had  also  been  president  and  a  director 
of  the  Chelsea  Gas  Light  Company,  a  director  of  the  North 
American  Insurance  Company  and  the  Fourth  Atlantic 
National  Bank  of  Boston,  and  of  the  Boston  Ice  Company. 

Mr.  Peck  had  been  actively  interested  in  politics  for  many 
years,  and  was  at  one  time  a  member  of  the  Republican 
State  Committee,  being  sent  as  a  delegate  to  various  Repub- 
lican conventions.  In  1877,  he  was  elected  to  the  Massachu- 
setts House  of  Representatives,  and  served  until  1880, 
being  chairman  of  the  Joint  Committee  on  Education.     He 


6o  YALE    COLLEGE 

was  a  member  of  the  Pleasant  Street  Congregational  Church 
of  Arlington. 

He  died  at  his  home  in  that  town,  June  i8,  1916,  after 
an  illness  of  several  weeks,  and  was  buried  in  Mount 
Auburn  Cemetery. 

On  October  22,  1878,  he  was  married  in  Arlington  to 
Anna  Maria,  daughter  of  Henry  D.  and  Maria  D.  Newell, 
whose  death  occurred  September  12,  1884.  Their  two  chil- 
dren,— Chester  Gaylord  and  Lilian  Newell  (Mrs.  William 
D.  Elwell  of  Arlington), — survive. 


John  Campbell  Brown,  B.A.   1865 

Born  July  17,  1843,  in  Pittsburgh,  Pa. 
Died  December  27,  1915,  in  Pittsburgh,  Pa. 

John  Campbell  Brown  was  the  son  of  John  Brown,  a 
capitalist,  whose  parents  were  James  and  Rachel  (Camp- 
bell) Brown.  His  mother  was  Rebecca  W.,  daughter  of 
Nathaniel  and  Mary  (Jones)  Plummer.  Born  in  Pittsburgh, 
Pa.,  July  17,  1843,  he  attended  the  Ormond  School  in  that 
city  until  1856,  when  he  matriculated  at  the  Western  Uni- 
versity of  Pennsylvania  (now  the  University  of  Pittsburgh). 
He  came  to  Yale  in  1861,  and  was  a  member  of  the  Glyuna 
Boat  Club,  Linonia,  and  the  Wooden  Spoon  Committee. 

Returning  to  Pittsburgh  after  graduation,  he  took  up  the 
real  estate  business,  in  1866  becoming  a  member  of  the 
firm  of  John  C.  Brown  &  Company.  Since  1882,  he  had 
been  connected  with  the  Sheriff's  Office  of  Allegheny 
County,  and  at  the  time  of  his  death  held  the  position  of 
clerk  of  real  estate. 

He  died,  from  heart  disease,  December  27,  191 5,  at  Pitts- 
burgh, and  was  buried  in  Allegheny  Cemetery  in  that  city. 

He  was  unmarried.  His  brother,  James  Plummer,  gradu- 
ated from  the  College  in  1862  and  from  the  Harvard  Law 
School  in  1864. 


1864-1865  6i 


James  Wesley  Cooper,  B.A.   1865 

Born  October  6,  1842,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  March  16,  1916,  in  New  York  City 

James  Wesley  Cooper  was  the  son  of  James  Ford  Cooper, 
a  carriage  manufacturer,  and  Cornelia  (Walkley)  Cooper, 
and  was  born  October  6,  1842,  in  New  Haven,  Conn.,  where 
he  was  prepared  for  college  at  the  Hopkins  Grammar 
School.  His  father  was  the  son  of  Timothy  and  Sarah 
(Ford)  Cooper  and  a  descendant  of  Timothy  Ford,  who 
came  to  this  country  from  England  in  1639.  Through  his 
mother,  who  was  the  daughter  of  Joel  and  Sybil  (Austin) 
Walkley,  he  was  descended  from  Richard  Walkley.  At 
Yale,  he  was  a  member  of  Linonia  and  the  Beethoven 
Society,  and  received  a  Dispute  appointment  in  Junior  year, 
in  the  latter  part  of  which  he  withdrew  to  accept  a  com- 
mission as  assistant  adjutant  general  of  Connecticut  with 
the  rank  of  captain.  On  petition  of  his  classmates,  the 
degree  of  B.A.,  with  enrollment  in  the  Class  of  1865,  was 
voted  to  him  by  the  Yale  Corporation  in  1879,  because  of 
the  fact  that  he  had  seen  service  in  the  Civil  War. 

In  1868,  Mr.  Cooper  was  graduated  from  Andover  Theo- 
logical Seminary,  and,  following  his  ordination  to  the  Con- 
gregational ministry  in  September  of  that  year,  he  served 
for  three  years  as  pastor  of  the  Congregational  Church  at 
Rockport,  Mass.  He  held  the  pastorate  of  the  Lockport 
(N.  Y.)  Congregational  Church  from  1871  to  1878,  and  in 
the  latter  year  accepted  a  call  to  the  South  Congregational 
Church  of  New  Britain,  Conn.  He  held  that  charge  for 
the  next  twenty-five  years,  and  during  his  pastorate  the 
church  membership  increased  until  it  became  one  of  the 
largest  in  the  state.  In  1903,  he  resigned  to  become  senior 
corresponding  secretary  of  the  American  Missionary  Asso- 
ciation, with  headquarters  in  New  York  City.  For  the  next 
seven  years,  while  directing  the  home  mission  work  of  the 
Congregational  Church  in  America,  he.  traveled  extensively 
in  the  interests  of  the  association.  He  was  made  one  of  its 
vice  presidents  upon  his  retirement  in  1910,  and  held  that 
office  until  two  years  ago.  For  the  past  six  years,  he  had 
made  his  home  at  Hartford,  Conn.,  and  had  given  most  of 
his  time  to  writing  on  theological  subjects,  although  he  con- 
tinued to  preach  occasionally. 


62  YALE  COLLEGE 

From  1884  tintil  191 4,  Dr.  Cooper  was  a  corporate  mem- 
ber of  the  American  Board  of  Commissioners  for  Foreign 
Missions,  and  in  1891  he  was  sent  as  a  delegate  to  the 
International  Council  of  Congregational  Churches  at  Lon- 
don. From  1878  to  1888,  he  acted  as  chaplain  of  the 
First  Regiment,  Connecticut  National  Guard.  He  was  a 
member  of  the  Governor's  Staff  Association,  Dr.  Cooper 
had  served  as  a  Fellow  of  Yale  University  since  1885,  being 
also  a  member  of  the  Prudential  Committee.  He  was  a 
trustee  of  Hampton  Institute,  Piedmont  College,  Atlanta 
Theological  Seminary,  Fisk  University,  Talladega  College, 
Tougaloo  University,  Straight  University,  and  Tillotson 
College.  In  1886,  Olivet  College  conferred  the  honorary 
degree  of  D.D.  upon  him. 

Dr.  Cooper's  death  occurred  very  suddenly,  from  heart 
trouble,  March  16,  1916,  in  New  York  City,  where  he  was 
staying  for  a  few  days.  His  body  was  taken  to  New  Britain 
for  burial  in  Fairview  Cemetery. 

He  was  married  August  13,  1868,  in  Manchester,  Conn., 
to  Ellen  M.,  daughter  of  Elisha  Edgerton  and  Charlotte 
Day  (Spencer)  Hilliard,  who  survives  him.  He  leaves  also 
his  two  sons:  Elisha  Hilliard  (B.A.  1892)  and  James 
Earnest,  who  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  at  Yale  in  1895 
and  that  of  LL.B.  at  Harvard  three  years  later. 


Charles  Hemmenway  Adams,  B.A.   1866 

Born  September  26,  1845,  in  Fairfield,  Conn. 
Died  August  28,  1915,  in  Derby,  Conn, 

Charles  Hemmenway  Adams  was  the  son  of  Rev.  Charles 
Robert  Adams  and  Mary  (Scott)  Adams,  and  was  born 
September  26,  1845,  in  Fairfield,  Conn.,  where  his  father, 
a  clergyman  in  the  Methodist  Episcopal  Church,  was 
preaching  as  a  member  of  the  New  York  East  Conference. 
The  family  removed  to  Chicago  in  his  boyhood,  and  he  was 
fitted  for  college  at  the  Chicago  High  School.  Before 
entering  Yale  as  a  Sophomore  in  1863,  he  spent  a  year  at 
Asbury,  a  small  Western  college.  He  received  two  first 
prizes  for  excellence  in  English  composition  while  a  Sopho- 
more, and  in  1865  was  awarded  the  Lit  medal ;   his  appoint- 


1865-1867  63 

merits  were  Orations,  and  he  was  elected  to  membership  in 
Phi  Beta  Kappa,  and  also  belonged  to  Brothers  in  Unity. 

Immediately  after  graduation,  Mr.  Adams  took  up  news- 
paper work,  and  for  a  year  was  on  the  staff  of  the  New 
York  Evening  Post.  In  1867,  he  accepted  a  position  on  the 
Hartford  (Conn.)  Courant,  after  which  he  was  for  a  year 
on  the  staff  of  the  Troy  (N.  Y.)  Times,  and  for  six  on  the 
Springfield  Republican.  From  1876  to  1881,  he  was  again 
located  in  New  York  City,  as  a  member  of  the  reportorial 
staff  of  the  Sun,  but  in  1881,  he  returned  to  Hartford  as  an 
editorial  writer  for  the  Courant.  Although  he  retired  from 
that  position  in  March,  1914,  on  account  of  poor  health, 
he  had  continued  to  make  occasional  editorial  contributions 
to  the  Courant  until  a  few  weeks  before  his  death. 

He  died  suddenly,  from  heart  trouble,  August  28,  191 5, 
in  Derby,  Conn.,  at  the  home  of  his  sister,  with  whom  he 
had  lived  for  some  time.  Burial  was  in  Oak  Cliff  Cemetery 
in  that  town. 

He  had  never  married.  Donald  A.  Hallock,  a  non-gradu- 
ate member  of  the  Class  of  1909  in  the  Scientific  School, 
is  a  nephew.  The  latter's  sister  married  Samuel  J.  Hammitt 
(Ph.B.  1909). 


Henry  Beach  Beard,  B.A.   1867 

Born  January  25,  1843,  in  Huntington,  Conn. 
Died  July  9,  1915,  in  Minneapolis,  Minn. 

Henry  Beach  Beard  was  born  on  January  25,  1843,  i^i 
Huntington,  Conn.,  his  parents  being  James  Beard,  a 
farmer,  and  Caroline  (Wood)  Beard.  His  paternal  ances- 
tors came  from  England  to  this  country  in  1640,  and  settled 
in  Stratford,  Conn.  Entering  Yale  from  Easton  Academy 
in  1862,  he  spent  two  years  with  the  Class  of  1866,  and 
then,  after  an  absence  of  a  year,  completed  his  course  with 
the  Class  of  1867.    He  was  a  member  of  Brothers  in  Unity. 

Most  of  his  life  since  graduation  had  been  spent  in  the 
real  estate  and  life  insurance  business  in  Minneapolis, 
Minn.,  to  which  place  he  had  moved  in  1869.  He  was 
known  as  the  father  of  the  lake-boulevard  system  of  that 
city. 


64  YALE  COLLEGE 

Mr.  Beard  was  ordained  as  a  minister  of  the  Congrega- 
tional Church  in  1876  at  Little  Valley,  N.  J.,  having 
received  his  theological  training  at  Yale.  Although  giving 
the  greater  part  of  his  time  to  his  business  interests,  he 
had  throughout  his  life  devoted  his  attention  to  quite  an 
extent  to  the  work  of  the  ministry,  supplying  various 
churches  as  occasion  arose.  For  many  years,  he  was  a 
member  of  the  Plymouth  Congregational  Church  of  Minne- 
apolis, later  being  identified  with  the  affairs  of  the  Lowry 
Hill  Congregational  Church,  which  he  had  assisted  in 
building  up  from  a  Sunday  school  mission. 

His  death  occurred  at  his  home  in  Minneapolis,  July  9, 
191 5,  as  the  result  of  sciatica.  He  was  buried  in  Lake- 
wood  Cemetery  in  that  city. 

He  was  married  in  New  Haven,  Conn.,  June  23,  1869, 
to  Sarah  R.,  daughter  of  William  S.  and  Nancy  (Vaughan) 
Read,  who  survives  him.  They  had  four  children:  a  son 
who  died  in  infancy;  Harry  S.  (died  September  10,  1872)  ; 
William  S.,  who  survives,  and  Minnie  B.,  who  died  October 
3,  1908. 


Peter  Brynberg-  Porter,  B.A.   1867 

Born  January  17,  1845,  in  Wilmington,  Del. 
Died  August  6,  191 5,  in  New  York  City 

Peter  Brynberg  Porter  was  born  January  17,  1845,  ^1^ 
Wilmington,  Del.,  where  he  received  part  of  his  preparation 
for  college  at  the  Delaware  Military  Academy.  He  had 
also  studied  with  private  tutors  in  that  city  and  in  Phila- 
delphia, Pa.  His  father  was  Peter  Brynberg  Porter,  a 
publisher  and  bookseller  of  Wilmington,  and  the  son  of 
Robert  Porter,  who  had  married  Ann,  daughter  of  Peter 
Brynberg,  whose  ancestors  were  am.ong  the  original  settlers 
in  Delaware,  having  emigrated  from  Sweden  in  1638.  His 
mother  was  Elizabeth  Deacon,  daughter  of  Thomas  Canby 
Alrich  and  a  descendant  of  Jacob  Alrich,  who  came  to 
America  in  1655  as  the  first  governor  of  the  Dutch  colonies 
on  the  Delaware. 

He  joined  the  Class  of  1867  at  the  beginning  of  Sopho- 
more year.  The  following  year,  he  received  an  Oration 
appointment,  and  he  spoke  at  Junior  Exhibition  and  at  Com- 


1867-1868  65 

mcncement,  his  appointment  in  Senior  year  being  a  Dis- 
sertation.    He  was  a  member  of  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 

Following  his  graduation  from  Yale,  he  entered  the  Uni- 
versity of  Pennsylvania,  where  in  1869  he  received  the 
degree  of  M.D.  He  was  president  of  his  Class  there.  He 
then  began  a  two-year  service  as  resident  physician  at  the 
Philadelphia  Hospital.  Since  1871,  he  had  practiced  in 
New  York  City,  where  he  had  served  as  attending  physician 
to  the  DeMilt  and  Northeastern  Dispensaries,  the  New  York 
Free  Dispensary  for  Sick  Children,  and  the  New  York 
Infant  Asylum.  He  was  also  for  a  time  the  New  York  cor- 
respondent for  the  Medical  News  of  Philadelphia,  and  in 
1885  was  elected  recording  secretary  of  the  New  York 
County  Medical  Association,  in  that  year  being  also  chosen 
editor  of  Gaillard's  Medical  Journal.  For  many  years,  he 
was  New  York  editor  of  the  Boston  Medical  and  Surgical 
Journal,  and  in  1913  he  was  elected  a  member  of  the  edi- 
torial board  of  the  Nezi}  York  Medical  Journal.  Since  its 
organization  in  1899,  Dr.  Porter  had  served  as  recording 
secretary  of  the  Medical  Association  of  the  Greater  City  of 
New  York  and  as  editor  of  its  Transactions,  and  he  had 
also  edited  the  Transactions  of  the  American  Therapeutic 
Society.  He  had  at  times  contributed  to  other  medical 
journals,  and  had  read  original  poems  on  the  occasion  of 
several  patriotic  celebrations.  He  belonged  to  the  New 
York  Academy  of  Medicine. 

Dr.  Porter's  death  occurred  on  August  6,  191 5,  in  St. 
Mark's  Hospital,  New  York  City,  after  an  illness  of  one 
week  due  to  heart  trouble.  He  was  cremated,  his  ashes 
being  interred  in  the  Wilmington  Cemetery. 

He  was  unmarried.  A  brother,  Thomas  Alrich  Porter, 
was  a  non-graduate  member  of  the  College  Class  of  1864. 


Beach  Hill,  B.A.   1868 

Born  August  26,  1839,  in  Easton,  Conn. 
Died  March  31,  1916,  in  Bridgeport,  Conn. 

Beach  Hill,  who  was  born  August  26,  1839,  in  Easton, 
Conn.,  was  the  son  of  Edward  Hill,  a  merchant,  and  Cor- 
nelia (Beach)  Hill.  His  father,  a  descendant  of  William 
Hill,  who  came  to  America  from  England  in   1632,  was 


66  YALE  COLLEGE 

the  son  of  Seth  and  Cynthia  (Banks)  Hill.  His  mother's 
father  was  Ambrose  Beach. 

His  preparation  for  college  was  received  at  the  academy 
in  his  native  town,  and  in  1859  he  entered  Yale  as  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Class  of  1863.  At  the  end  of  the  second  term 
of  Sophomore  year,  he  withdrew,  and,  after  teaching  for 
a  while  at  Newtown,  Conn.,  enlisted  in  the  Twenty-third 
Connecticut  Volunteer  Infantry,  serving  in  Louisiana  until 
mustered  out  of  service.  In  September,  1865,  he  returned 
to  Yale,  and  completed  his  course  with  the  Class  of  1868, 
graduating  with  a  Dispute  stand. 

He  had  absented  himself  during  a  part  of  Senior  year  to 
take  charge  of  Newtown  Academy,  and  after  receiving  his 
degree,  served  for  four  years  as  its  principal.  Returning 
to  Easton  Academy  as  principal  in  1872,  he  was  connected 
with  that  institution  for  two  years,  and  then  purchased  a 
farm  at  Trumbull,  Conn.,  where  for  four  years  he  con- 
ducted a  boarding  and  day  school.  He  rented  his  farm  in 
1879,  and  went  to  Bridgeport,  there  becoming  principal  of 
a  private  high  school,  but  returned  to  Trumbull  six  years 
later,  and  devoted  the  rest  of  his  life  to  teaching  and  farm- 
ing. Mr.  Hill  was  a  member  of  the  Baptist  Church  at 
Stepney,  Conn.,  and  taught  a  Bible  class  there  for  many 
years. 

He  died  in  the  Bridgeport  (Conn.)  Hospital,  March  31, 
1 91 6,  as  the  result  of  a  cancer.  Burial  was  in  the  cemetery 
at  Stepney. 

On  February  3,  1869,  he  was  married  in  that  town  to 
Mary,  daughter  of  Eli  and  Sarah.  (Lord)  Leavenworth,  by 
whom  he  had  four  children:  Ina,  who  died  in  infancy; 
Edith  May;  Bertha  (died  March  14,  1877),  and  Wallace 
Leavenworth.    Mrs.  Hill  died  January  18,  1903. 


Frank  Moore,  B.A.   1868 

Born  September  6,  1845,  in  St.  Clair,  Mich. 
Died  July  12,  1915,  in  St.  Clair,  Mich. 

Frank  Moore,  son  of  Reuben  and  Margaret  Trigallous 
(Riddle)  Moore,  was  born  in  St.  Clair,  Mich.,  September 
6,  1845.  His  father  went  from  Manchester,  N.  H.,  to 
Michigan  about  1840.    He  was  a  lumberman,  one  of  the  first 


i868  67 

settlers  in  the  region  known  as  "Yankee  Street,"  north  of 
St.  Clair.  Joseph  Moore,  his  father,  Samuel  Moore,  his 
grandfather,  and  John  Goffe,  his  great-grandfather,  were 
all  in  the  Revolution.  Entering  Yale  in  1863  from  Willis- 
ton  Seminary  at  Easthampton,  Mass.,  Frank  Moore  spent 
Freshman  year  and  a  part  of  Sophomore  year  with  the  Class 
of  1867,  but  joined  the  Class  with  which  he  was  graduated 
at  the  beginning  of  its  Sophomore  year.  He  received  a 
prize  in  declamation  that  year,  was  given  a  Dispute  appoint- 
ment both  in  Junior  year  and  at  Commencement,  and 
belonged  to  Linonia,  of  which  he  was  chosen  vice  president 
in  Senior  year. 

He  spent  the  first  six  months  after  graduation  in  a  law 
office  in  Detroit,  Mich.,  and  then  became  a  bookkeeper  for 
the  H.  W.  Sage  Lumber  Company  in  Toledo,  Ohio. 
Removing  to  Detroit  in  187 1,  he  entered  the  lumber  busi- 
ness there,  later  being  similarly  engaged  in  Saginaw.  He 
returned  to  St.  Clair  in  1875,  and  for  the  next  ten  years 
was  engaged  in  farming.  In  1879,  ^^  purchased  the  St. 
Clair  Republican,  a  weekly  paper,  of  which  he  continued 
as  editor  and  publisher  until  1895.  From  1887  up  to  the 
time  of  his  death,  he  held  the  office  of  secretary  and  treas- 
urer of  the  Diamond  Crystal  Salt  Company  of  St.  Clair. 
Mr.  Moore  served  as  postmaster  of  that  city  from  1881 
until  1886,  and  again  from  1890  until  1894.  He  was  a 
member  of  the  Michigan  Legislature  in  1899- 1900  and 
again  in  1901-02.  He  belonged  to  the  First  Congregational 
Church  of  St.  Clair. 

Since  about  1913,  he  had  been  in  poor  health,  and  was 
confined  to  his  bed  for  the  last  two  months  before  his  death, 
which  occurred,  from  arterio  sclerosis,  at  his  home  in  'St. 
Clair,  July  12,  191 5.  Burial  was  in  Hillside  Cemetery  in 
that  place. 

On  June  11,  1873,  ^^  was  married  in  Toledo  to  Emily 
Sprague,  daughter  of  William  Elias  and  Laura  Comfort 
(Canfield)  Parmelee.  Mrs.  Moore,  who  died  in  Castile, 
N.  Y.,  June  20,  1898,  was  a  non-graduate  member  of  the 
Class  of  1867  at  Mount  Holyoke  College.  Their  four  chil- 
dren,— Laura  (B.A.  University  of  Michigan  1899)  ;  Frank- 
lin; Margaret  Elizabeth  (now  Mrs.  Henry  Jones  Phelps 
of  Detroit),  a  non-graduate  member  of  the  Class  of  1901 
at  Olivet  College,  and  Emily  Comfort,  who  graduated  in 
1908  from  Wellesley  College, — survive. 


6^  YALE   COLLEGE 


Samuel  Parry,  B.A.   1868 

Born  March  29,  1845,  in  Lambertville,  N.  J. 
Died  September  9,  1915,  in  Somerville,  N,  J. 

Samuel  Parry,  son  of  Samuel  Parry,  a  miller,  and  Selinda 
(VanSyckel)  Parry,  was  born  in  Lambertville,  N.  J., 
March  29,  1845,  ^^^  family  removing  to  Clinton,  N.  J., 
when  he  was  two  years  of  age.  His  earliest  paternal  ances- 
tor in  this  country  came,  with  his  family,  from  Wales  at 
the  end  of  the  seventeenth  century,  and  settled  in  the  Wil- 
liam Penn  colony  near  Philadelphia.  His  mother  was  of 
Dutch  descent,  her  people  coming  to  Long  Island  in  1653 
and  later  extending  over  into  New  Jersey.  Entering  Yale 
in  1864  from  the  Blairstown  (N.  J.)  Presbyterial  Academy, 
Samuel  Parry  received  an  Oration  appointment  in  Junior 
year  and  a  Dissertation  Senior  year,  and  was  elected  to  Phi 
Beta  Kappa.  He  rowed  in  the  Varuna  shell  in  the  harbor 
races  in  his  Sophomore  year,  and  was  commodore  of  the 
Yale  Navy  and  stroke  oar  of  the  University  Crew  in  1868. 

After  a  year  spent  in  teaching  at  the  academy  at  Blairs- 
town, he  entered  Princeton  Theological  Seminary,  where 
he  studied  for  the  next  two  years.  His  theological  course 
was  completed  at  Union  Theological  Seminary,  from  which 
he  was  graduated  in  1872.  He  was  ordained  to  the  ministry 
of  the  Presbyterian  Church  on  April  30,  1873,  after  he  had 
spent  a  year  at  home,  engaged  in  post-graduate  study.  The 
entire  course  of  his  active  ministry,  covering  a  period  of 
thirty-three  years,  was  spent  as  pastor  of  the  Pluckamin 
Presbyterian  Church  at  Pluckemin,  N.  J.  Since  his  retire- 
ment in  1906,  he  had  made  his  home  in  Somerville,  N.  J., 
where  he  died  suddenly,  September  9,  191 5,  from  heart 
failure,  brought  on  by  diabetes.  He  was  buried  in  the  new 
cemetery  in  Somerville. 

During  the  last  few  years,  he  taught  a  men's  Bible  class 
at  the  First  Reformed  Church  in  Somerville,  preached 
occasionally,  and  took  an  active  part  in  the  work  at  the 
chapel  in  East  Somerville.  His  attention  since  his  retire- 
ment had  been  largely  given  to  historical  studies.  He  held 
the  office  of  stated  clerk  of  the  Presbytery  of  Elizabeth 
from  1888  until  his  death,  and  represented  the  Presbytery 
three  times  in  the  General  Assembly  from  the  state  of  New 
Jersey.     He  served  for  several  years  as  secretary  of  the 


i868  69 

Raritan  Ministerial  Association,  and,  from  its  organization 
until  19 1 2,  as  secretary  of  the  Inter-Church  Federation  of 
Somerset  County.  On  March  12,  1901,  on  the  fiftieth  anni- 
versary of  its  organization,  he  delivered  an  historical  dis- 
course in  the  Pluckamin  Presbyterian  Church. 

His  marriage  took  place  in  Somerville,  December  i,  1875, 
to  Harriet  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  Rev.  Dr.  Frederick  Frel- 
inghuysen  Cornell  (B.A.  Princeton  1825)  and  Elizabeth 
Clock  (Bell)  Cornell,  by  whom  he  had  one  son,  Samuel 
Cornell,  who  died  shortly  after  birth.  Mrs.  Parry  survives 
her  husband. 


Francis  Eugene  Seagrave,  B.A.   1868 

Born  November  5,  1843,  in  Bellingham,  Mass. 
Died  May  19,  1916,  in  Toledo,  Ohio 

Francis  Eugene  Seagrave,  a  descendant  in  the  fifth  gen- 
eration of  Capt.  Edward  Seagrave,  who  commanded  a 
company  of  infantry  from  Uxbridge,  Mass.,  during  the 
Revolutionary  War,  was  born  November  5,  1843,  i^  I^^^- 
lingham,  Mass.  His  earliest  ancestor  in  this  country  was 
Edward  Seagrave,  who  came  from  England  in  1725,  and 
settled  at  Uxbridge.  His  father,  John  Seagrave,  a  mason, 
was  the  son  of  John  and  Mary  (Scott)  Seagrave.  His 
mother  was  Almena,  daughter  of  Ziba  Ross,  who  served 
in  the  American  Army  during  the  War  of  1812,  and  Nancy 
(Munyon)  Ross. 

He  passed  his  boyhood  in  Uxbridge,  and  received  his 
preparation  for  college  at  Phillips  Academy,  Andover.  At 
Yale,  he  belonged  to  Linonia,  being  its  president  in  Senior 
year,  was  a  member  of  Phi  Beta  Kappa,  and  received 
Oration  appointments.  During  his  Senior  year,  he  was 
selected  by  -the  Faculty  to  reorganize  the  schools  of  the 
state  of  Florida.  He  was  in  Florida  several  months,  and 
upon  his  return  North,  resumed  his  place  in  his  Class, 
graduating  with  honors  in  1868. 

Mr.  Seagrave  served  as  principal  of  the  Toledo  (Ohio) 
High  School  for  the  first  three  years  after  his  graduation. 
In  1 87 1,  he  formed,  with  James  Raymer,  the  banking  firm 
of  Raymer  &  Seagrave,  the  name  of  which  was  changed  to 
Raymer,  Seagrave  &  Company  two  years  afterwards,  on 


70  YALE   COLLEGE 

the  admission  of  Mr.  Seagrave's  brother,  Orville  B.  Sea- 
grave,  to  membership.  The  firm  was  dissolved  in  Decem- 
ber, 1884,  and  early  in  the  next  year  Mr.  Seagrave  and  his 
brother  opened  offices  in  Toledo,  Boston,  and  Uxbridge 
under  the  name  of  Seagrave  Brothers.  This  connection 
was  continued  until  the  death  of  Mr.  O.  B.  Seagrave  in 
1886.  After  that  time,  Mr.  Seagrave  gave  his  attention  to 
the  other  business  enterprises  in  which  he  had  for  a  long 
time  been  interested.  In  the  early  seventies,  he  built  the 
first  street  railway  in  Toledo,  and  some  thirty  years  later 
built  the  Toledo  &  Western  Railway,  of  which  he  was  from 
1 901  to  1903  secretary  and  treasurer.  For  the  next  three 
years,  he  held  the  office  of  president  of  the  Toledo  &  Chi- 
cago Interurban  Railway  Company.  He  also  built  two 
electric  roads  in  Indiana — the  Indianapolis  &  New  Castle 
Railway  and  the  Toledo  &  Chicago  Interurban.  Since  1907, 
he  had  not  been  actively  engaged  in  construction  work,  but 
had  given  most  of  his  interest  to  mining  operations  in 
Colorado. 

His  death  occurred  unexpectedly  May  19,  1916,  at  his 
home  in  Toledo,  as  the  result  of  an  attack  of  acute  indiges- 
tion.   Burial  was  in  Woodlawn  Cemetery  in  that  city. 

Mr.  Seagrave  was  married  in  Toledo,  July  i,  1869,  to 
Charlotte  C.  Lee  of  Norwich,  Conn.,  daughter  of  Lyman 
W.  and  Mary  (Miner)  Lee.  She  died  December  6,  1912. 
Four  children  survive:  Mary  Almena,  the  wife  of  Rodell 
D.  Murray  of  Toledo;  Jessie  Lee;  Lillian  Miner,  who 
married  Ralph  M.  Chapman  of  Toledo,  and  Walter  Howard 
(Ph.B.  1904,  LL.B.  Western  Reserve  1907).  A  son,  Harry 
Wentworth,  died  in  1884. 


Sheldon  Thompson  Viele,  B.A.   1868 

Born  January  4,  1847,  in  Buffalo,  N.  Y.' 
Died  May  12,  1916,  in  Buffalo,  N.  Y. 

Sheldon  Thompson  Viele  was  born  in  Buffalo,  N.  Y., 
January  4,  1847,  being  a  descendant  of  Pieter  Cornelison 
Viele,  whose  father,  Cornelis  Volkertszen,  who  came  from 
Holland  to  New  York  early  in  the  seventeenth  century,  had 
adopted  the  occupational  name  "Velius,"  meaning  sail- 
maker,  according  to  one  explanation  of  the  family  name. 


i868  71 

Henry  Knickerbocker  Viele,  his  father,  practiced  his  pro- 
fession as  a  lawyer  in  Albany  and  Buffalo  for  many  years, 
and  served  during  the  Civil  War  as  colonel  of  the  Ninety- 
fourth  Regiment,  New  York  Volunteers ;  he  was  the  son  of 
John  Ludovicus  Viele,  who  was  a  member  of  the  New  York 
State  Senate  in  1822  and  from  1826  to  1829,  and  who  was 
appointed  on  February  6,  1832,  a  regent  of  the  University 
of  the  State  of  New  York,  and  Catalina  (Knickerbocker) 
Viele,  the  latter  being  the  granddaughter  of  Col.  John 
Knickerbocker,  who  served  both  in  the  French  War  and  in 
the  Revolution.  Sheldon  Viele's  mother  was  Laetitia  Porter, 
daughter  of  Sheldon  Thompson,  one  of  the  founders  of  the 
lake  transportation  industry  and  the  first  mayor  of  Buffalo 
elected  by  the  people,  and  Catherine  (Barton)  Thompson. 
Through  her,  he  was  descended  from  Jabez  Thompson,  an 
officer  in  the  French  War,  who  was  killed  in  the  Revolution, 
while  serving  as  a  colonel,  and  from  Anthony  Thompson, 
who  came  with  Theophilus  Eaton  and  Rev.  John  Davenport 
from  England  to  New  Haven  Colony  in  1637. 

He  entered  Yale  from  the  Walnut  Hill  School,  Geneva, 
N.  Y.,  and  in  Sophomore  year  took  composition  prizes  and 
a  special  prize  for  a  poem.  He  wrote  the  Colloquy  for  the 
Wooden  Spoon  exhibition  and  the  parting  ode  for  Presenta- 
tion Day. 

After  graduation,  he  began  the  study  of  law  in  the  office 
of  E.  C.  Sprague  (B.A.  Harvard  1843,  LL.D.  Harvard 
1892)  of  Buffalo,  and  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  November, 
1869.  In  May,  1871,  after  a  clerkship  of  two  years,  he 
began  a  practice  which  continued  until  his  death,  being  asso- 
ciated for  some  years  after  1887  with  Willis  O.  Chapin, 
who  received  an  honorary  M.A.  from  Hobart  College  in 
1906,  under  the  firm  name  of  Viele  &  Chapin.  In  1908,  Mr. 
Viele's  older  son  became  his  law  partner,  but  for  the  past 
five  years  he  had  practiced  independently. 

In  February,  1880,  he  was  awarded  a  prize  of  two  hun- 
dred and  fifty  dollars  by  the  New  York  State  Bar  Associa- 
tion for  one  of  the  two  best  essays  on  the  subject:  "Is  the 
Common  Law  a  Proper  Subject  for  Codification?"  He  was 
chosen  secretary  of  the  earliest  district  established  in  the 
country  by  the  first  Charity  Organization  Society,  and  was 
a  trustee  of  that  society  from  its  incorporation  until  1908. 
He  was  also  active  in  the  reform  of  the  Civil  Service,  being 
on  the  executive  committee  of  the  Buffalo  association  from 


72  YALE    COLLEGE 

its  organization.  In  1906,  Governor  Higgins  appointed 
him  a  state  lunacy  commissioner;  Governor  Hughes  reap- 
pointed him  the  next  year,  and  he  performed  excellent 
service  in  that  capacity  until  superseded  by  a  personal 
friend  of  Governor  Dix.  In  1885,  he  bore  the  principal  part 
in  founding  the  Yale  Association  of  Buffalo,  and  he  was 
its  president  in  1895-96.  In  1894,  he  had  a  large  share  in 
the  establishment  of  the  University  Club  of  Buffalo,  of 
which  he  was  the  first  president.  He  was  a  vestryman  of 
St.  Paul's  Protestant  Episcopal  Church  from  1891  until  his 
death,  and  had  at  various  times  been  vice  president  for 
Buffalo  of  the  Holland  Society  of  New  York,  a  curator  of 
the  Buffalo  Library,  a  director  of  the  Buffalo  Club,  dean 
of  the  Saturn  Club,  president  of  the  Buffalo  Association  of 
the  Sons  of  the  Revolution,  and  a  trustee  of  St.  Margaret's 
School  in  Buffalo.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Military  Order 
of  the  Loyal  Legion  and  of  the  Society  of  Colonial  Wars. 
He  was  the  author  of  a  "Memoir  of  Sheldon  Thompson" 
and  of  "A  Glimpse  of  Holland  in  1888,"  being  an  account 
of  the  visit  of  the  Holland  Society,  and  of  papers  on  "State 
Legislation  and  Charity  Organization"  in  the  Albany  Law 
Journal,  on  "The  Democratic  Principle  of  Civil  Service 
Reform"  in  a  printed  collection  of  papers  read  before  a 
Buffalo  political  association,  and  on  "The  Yale  Alumni 
Association  of  Western  New  York"  in  the  University 
Magazine  for  1896,  besides  addresses  before  the  New  York 
State  Bar  Association  and  other  bodies. 

Mr.  Viele  died  May  12,  1916,  at  his  home  in  Buffalo  after 
a  brief  illness.  The  immediate  cause  of  his  death  was  pneu- 
monia, but  he  had  never  entirely  recovered  from  injuries 
received  in  an  automobile  accident  over  a  year  earlier. 
Burial  was  in  Forest  Lawn  Cemetery,  Buffalo. 

He  was  married  in  Buffalo,  June  5,  1877,  to  Anna  Porter, 
daughter  of  Ebenezer  Pearson  and  Sarah  Frances  (Prince) 
Dorr,  who  survives  him  with  two  sons,  Dorr  (B.A.  1902, 
LL.B.  University  of  Buffalo  1904)  and  Sheldon  Knicker- 
bocker, a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1916,  and  three  daugh- 
ters, Grace,  who  received  the  degree  of  B.L.  at  Smith 
College  in  1901,  Anna,  and  Laetitia. 


[868-1869  73 


Theodore  Philander  Prudden,  B.A.   1869 

Born  March  14,  1847,  in  Middlebury,  Conn. 
Died  November  9,   1915,  in   Brooklinc,  Mass. 

Theodore  Philander  Prudden  was  a  descendant  of  Rev. 
Peter  Prudden,  leader  of  the  group  which  founded  the 
town  of  Milford,  Conn.,  in  1639,  and  Johanna  Boyce  of 
Edgeton,  Yorkshire,  England.  He  was  born  March  14, 
1847,  i^  Middlebury,  Conn.,  his  father  being  Rev.  George 
Peter  Prudden  (B.A.  1835),  who,  after  studying  from  1837 
to  1839  in  the  Yale  School  of  Religion,  served  for  a  number 
of  years  in  the  Congregational  ministry.  His  mother  was 
Eliza  Ann,  daughter  of  Ebenezer  and  Sally  (Mitchell) 
Johnson.  Pie  entered  Yale  from  Hopkins  Grammar  vSchool, 
New  Haven,  in  1865,  and  received  Colloquy  scholarship 
appointments  in  both  Junior  and  Senior  years. 

During  the  year  following  his  graduation,  he  was  princi- 
pal of  the  high  school  in  Branford,  Conn.  He  then  entered 
the  Yale  School  of  Religion,  receiving  at  the  end  of  his 
course  in  1873  the  degree  of  B.D.  The  following  year  and 
a  half  was  spent  in  European  travel,  with  special  studies  in 
Germany.  He  was  ordained  pastor  of  the  Plymouth  Con- 
gregational Church,  Lansing,  Mich.,  on  December  20,  1874, 
and  continued  there  until  1885,  when  he  took  charge  of  the 
Leavitt  Street  Congregational  Church  in  Chicago,  111.,  where 
he  remained  for  nine  years.  Both  of  these  pastorates  were 
notable  for  his  success  in  developing  from  small  beginnings 
large  and  flourishing  organizations,  with  new  and  com- 
modious edifices.  Dr.  Prudden  was  a  fearless  thinker  and 
a  thorough  student,  who  gave  careful  preparation  to  his 
pulpit  work.  In  1894,  he  was  called  to  the  Second  Congre- 
gational Church  of  Newton  at  West  Newton,  Mass.,  which 
he  served  for  thirteen  years,  retiring  in  1907. 

Since  his  resignation  from  that  charge,  he  had  constantly 
preached  in  various  churches  in  New  England,  giving  also 
much  attention  to  study  and  out-door  exercise.  The  stress 
of  a  long  and  active  career  made  itself  felt  at  last  in  the 
gradually  failing  functions  of  the  heart,  and  for  the  last 
few  years  of  his  life  his  health  was  poor.  His  death 
occurred  November  9,  19 15,  at  his  home  in  Brookline, 
Mass.,  where  he  had  lived  for  six  years.  He  was  buried  in 
Evergreen  Cemetery  at  New  Haven,  Conn. 


74  YALE    COLLEGE 

In  1890,  the  honorary  degree  of  D.D.  was  conferred  upon 
him  by  IlHnois  College.  He  was  the  author  of  "Twenty 
Years  of  the  History  of  the  Plymouth  Church,  Lansing, 
Mich."  (1874),  "Christianity  and  the  Natural  Sciences" 
(1875),  and  of  "Facts  about  the  Bible"  and  "Congre- 
tionalism :  What  it  is,"  both  carefully  compiled  catechisms 
for  the  use  of  young  people,  appearing  in  1906  and  1909. 

Dr.  Prudden  was  married  October  24,  1877,  in  Hartford, 
Conn.,  to  Harriette  Collins,  daughter  of  Roderick  and  Sarah 
Ann  (Pierson)  Terry  and  sister  of  his  classmate,  Henry 
Taylor  Terry.  She  died  on  January  28,  1886,  and  on  Octo- 
ber 20,  1887,  he  was  married  in  Quincy,  111.,  to  Margaret 
Hunter,  daughter  of  Lorenzo  and  Margaret  (Benedict) 
Bull,  who  survives  him.  Six  children  were  born  to  them: 
George  Gold,  who  died  at  the  age  of  four ;  Theodore  Mitch- 
ell, a  graduate  of  the  Scientific  School  in  1913;  Elinor; 
Lillian  Margaret;  Edith,  and  Elizabeth  Bull.  Dr.  Prudden 
had  no  children  by  his  first  marriage.  His  brother,  T. 
Mitchell  Prudden,  took  the  degree  of  Ph.B.  at  Yale  in  1872 
and  that  of  M.D.  in  1875,  being  honored  with  the  degree 
of  Doctor  of  Laws  in  1897,  and  his  sister,  Lillian  Eliza 
Prudden,  graduated  from  Vassar  in  1875. 


Aaron  Smith  Thomas,  B.A.   1869 

Born  March  26,  1847,  in  Wickford,  R.  I. 
Died  October  22,  191 5,  in  New  York  City 

Aaron  Smith  Thomas  was  the  son  of  Allen  Mason 
Thomas,  a  merchant,  whose  parents  were  Richard  and  Polly 
(Nichols)  Thomas,  and  was  born  in  Wickford,  R.  L,  March 
26,  1847.  He  was  descended  from  John  Thomas,  who 
came  to  America  in  1662,  having  been  driven  from  Wales 
by  the  "Act  of  Conformity,"  and  settled  in  Swansea,  Mass. 
His  great-grandfather,  Samuel  Thomas,  held  a  captain's 
commission  in  the  Revolutionary  War.  His  mother  was 
Charlotte  Proctor,  daughter  of  Elisha  Philips  and  Hannah 
(Peck)  Smith  and  a  descendant  of  Governor  Arnold  of 
Rhode  Island.  He  received  his  preparation  for  college  at 
the  Hopkins  Grammar  School  in  New  Haven,  and  entered 
with  the  Class  of  1869  as  a  Fresliman.    He  received  a  Dis- 


i869  75 

sertation  appointment  in  Junior  year  and  a  Dispute  at 
Commencement,  and  was  a  member  of  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 

For  a  few  months  after  his  graduation,  he  traveled  in 
Florida  and  Georgia,  and  then  entered  the  employ  of  S.  C. 
Kinsley,  Son  &  Company,  shoe  merchants  of  Providence, 
as  a  clerk.  Mr.  Thomas  went  to  New  York  City  in  1877, 
there  engaging  in  business  as  a  manufacturer  of  infants' 
shoes  under  the  name  of  Thomas  &  Company.  The  busi- 
ness of  this  concern  had  since  1880  been  conducted  in 
Brooklyn.  He  retired  as  its  head  in  1906,  and  since  that 
time  had  been  special  partner  in  the  brokerage  firm  of 
Clement  &  Whitney  of  New  York  City. 

He  had  served  as  a  vestryman  of  St.  Paul's  Protestant 
Episcopal  Church  of  Wickford  and  as  a  vestryman  and 
treasurer  of  Christ  Church,  New  York.  He  was  vice  presi- 
dent of  the  Laymen's  Christian  Federation,  and  a  member 
of  the  Brotherhood  of  St.  Andrew,  the  Sons  of  the  Ameri- 
can Revolution,  and  the  New  England  Society.  He  was 
a  director  of  the  Mount  Morris  Bank,  the  Williamsburg 
Savings  Bank,  and  the  New  England  Butt  Company  of 
Providence.  At  the  time  of  his  death  he  was  Secretary  of 
the  Class  of  1869,  having  held  that  office  for  several  years. 

He  died  October  22,  191 5,  at  his  home  in  New  York 
City,  after  an  illness  of  a  year  and  a  half  due  to  carcinoma. 
Burial  was  in  Elmgrove  Cemetery  in  his  native  town. 

His  marriage  took  place  on  May  24,  1883,  in  New  York 
City,  to  Clara  Louise  Hubbard,  daughter  of  Abner  D.  and 
Eliza  (Hunnewell)  Jones,  who  survives  him  with  their  two 
sons,  Clarence  Proctor  (B.A.  191 1,  M.D.  Columbia  1915), 
and  Winthrop  Gordon.  Mr.  Thomas  was  a  brother  of 
Elisha  Smith  Thomas  (B.A.  1858,  Honorary  D.D.  1887)  ; 
Nathaniel  P.  S.  Thomas,  a  graduate  of  Yale  College  in 
1868  and  of  the  Columbia  Law  School  in  1870,  and  Allen 
Mason  Thomas,  who  took  the  degree  of  Ph.B.  at  Yale  in 
1877  and  that  of  M.D.  at  Columbia  in  1880.  Allen  T. 
Clement  (B.A.  1903),  Waldo  P.  Clement,  Jr.  (B.A.  1908), 
and  Harold  R.  Talbot,  who  studied  in  the  Sheffield  Scientific 
School  from  1898  to  1901,  but  did  not  graduate,  are 
nephews. 


76  YALE    COLLEGE 


Walter  Rogers  Beach,  B.A.   1870 

Born  September  i,  1847,  in  Milford,  Conn. 
Died  December  27,  1915,  in  Mount  Vernon,  N.  Y. 

Walter  Rogers  Beach  was  the  son  of  Dennis  Beach,  a 
prominent  drygoods  merchant  of  New  York  City,  whose 
parents  were  Samuel  and  Charlotte  (Rogers)  Beach.  His 
mother  was  Maria,  daughter  of  David  and  Mary  (Smith) 
Clark  of  Milford,  Conn.  His  earliest  ancestors  in  this 
country  were  among  the  original  "planters"  of  Milford 
Colony  in  1639  (founded  by  members  of  the  New  Haven 
Colony),  among  them  being  John  Rogers,  Thomas  Beach, 
a  native  of  Derbyshire,  England,  and  George  Clark.  He 
was  also  a  lineal  descendant  of  Gov.  Robert  Treat,  of  Rev. 
Samuel  Andrew,  a  founder,  and  one  of  the  early  rectors  of 
Yale,  and  of  Capt.  Samuel  Bryan  Smith  and  Sergeant  Lan- 
day  Beach,  both  officers  who  rendered  distinguished  services 
in  the  American  Revolution. 

Born  in  Milford,  Conn.,  September  i,  1847,  tie  was  fitted 
for  college  at  Phillips  Academy,  Andover,  Mass.,  and 
entered  Yale  in  1866.  He  belonged  to  Linonia,  received 
a  Dissertation  appointment  in  Senior  year,  was  elected  to 
Phi  Beta  Kappa,  and  served  as  a  Class  historian.  Although 
too  young  to  serve  in  the  Civil  War,  he  had  three  brothers 
engaged  on  the  Union  side,  J.  Norton,  George  M.,  and 
Dennis,  the  latter  of  whom  served  through  the  entire  war. 

For  a  year  after  graduation,  he  taught  classics  and  mathe- 
matics in  the  Stamford  Military  Institute  at  Stamford, 
Conn.,  but  in  the  fall  of  1871  he  entered  the  Columbia  Uni- 
versity Law  School.  He  was  graduated  there  as  a  Bachelor 
of  Laws  iv  1873,  and  soon  afterwards  was  admitted  to  the 
New  York  Bar.  He  then  began  the  general  practice  of 
his  profession  in  New  York  City,  where,  from  1875  until 
about  1885,  he  was  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Norris  &  Beach. 
From  the  dissolution  of  this  partnership  until  1913,  he 
continued  alone,  in  that  year  retiring  from  practice  on 
account  of  ill  health.  He  made  a  special  study  of  corpora- 
tion law,  wills,  and  trusts,  and  was  counsel  for  a  number  of 
large  companies  and  estates. 

His  residence  was  in  New  York  City  until  1909,  when  he 
removed  to  Mount  Vernon,  N.  Y.,  where  he  died  December 


1870  77 

27,  1915-     His  death  was  due  to  hardening  of  the  arteries. 
Interment  was  in  his  native  town. 

Mr.  Beach  was  married  in  Washington,  D.  C,  July  25, 
1907,  to  Anna  Bodell,  daughter  of  Robert  Henry  and  Mary 
Oh  via  (Simpson)  Yeatman,  who  survives  him.  They  had 
no  children.  Three  brothers,  none  of  whom  is  now  living, 
attended  Yale:  William,  who  spent  some  time  with  the 
Class  of  1852,  Ferdinand,  who  received  the  degree  of  B.A. 
in  i860  and  that  of  M.D.  in  1864,  and  Dennis,  a  non- 
graduate  member  of  the  Class  of  1869. 


Robert  Kelly,  B.A.   1870 

Born  December  26,  1848,  in  New  York  City 
Died  January  6,  1916,  in  Superior,  Wis. 

Robert  Kelly  was  born  December  26,  1848,  in  New  York 
City,  his  parents  being  Robert  and  Arietta  A.  (Hutton) 
Kelly.  His  father,  who  was  the  son  of  Robert  and  Mar- 
garet (Shannon)  Kelly,  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  at 
Columbia  in  1826  and  an  honorary  LL.D.  from  the  Uni- 
versity of  Rochester  in  1852;  after  his  retirement  from 
business  he  was  active  in  literary  pursuits  and  philanthropic 
enterprises,  at  the  time  of  his  death  being  president  of  the 
Board  of  Education  of  New  York  City  and  president  of  the 
board  of  trustees  of  the  University  of  Rochester,  a  regent 
of  the  University  of  the  State  of  New  York,  and  chamber- 
lain of  New  York  City.  His  mother  was  the  daughter  of 
George  and  Elizabeth  (Smedes)  Hutton  and  a  descendant 
of  George  Hutton,  who  came  to  America  from  England  and 
settled  in  New  York,  and  of  Domini  Mancius,  who  came 
to  Kingston,  N.  Y.,  from  Holland. 

He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  the  Dwight  School  in  New  York 
City,  and  received  Colloquy  appointments  in  Junior  and 
Senior  years  in  college,  where  he  belonged  to  Brothers  in 
Unity. 

He  took  up  the  study  of  law  at  Columbia  in  the  fall  of 
1870,  at  the  same  time  entering  the  office  of  his  uncle,  Wil- 
liam Kelly,  in  New  York  City.  He  went  abroad  in  the 
spring  of  1871,  returning  in  the  fall  with  the  intention  of 
continuing  his  law  course,  but  had  to  return  to  England 


78  YALE    COLLEGE 

almost  at  once  with  an  uncle  who  was  in  poor  health.  He 
completed  his  work  for  his  degree  in  1873,  being  admitted 
to  the  bar  in  June  of  that  year.  He  practiced  for  only  a 
very  brief  period,  giving  his  attention  instead  to  the 
development  of  iron  and  copper  companies  in  Pennsylvania, 
Ohio,  and  Arizona.  In  1886,  when  the  failure  of  a  number 
of  these  companies  occurred,  he  removed  to  Hastings-on- 
Hudson,  N.  Y.,  where  he  made  his  home  until  1892,  during 
the  last  four  years  holding  the  position  of  superintendent 
of  industries  of  the  New  York  House  of  Refuge.  From 
1892  until  1896,  he  was  business  manager  of  the  West 
Superior  Iron  &  Steel  Company  at  West  Superior,  Wis.  In 
the  latter  year,  Mr.  Kelly  became  general  manager  of  the 
Land  &  River  Improvement  Company,  and  served  in  that 
capacity  until  his  death.  He  was  also  the  resident  manager 
of  the  United  States  Cast  Iron  Pipe  &  Foundry  Company 
and  vice  president  of  the  First  National  Bank.  In  1896,  he 
spent  six  months  at  Punxsutawney,  Pa.,  supervising  the 
construction  of  a  blast  furnace  for  the  Punxsutawney  Iron 
Company.  Since  1899,  he  had  been  a  member  of  the  Supe- 
rior Park  Commission.  At  the  time  of  his  death,  he  was 
greatly  interested  in  the  construction  of  a  building  for  the 
Y.  M.  C.  A.  at  Superior.  He  attended  the  Pilgrim  Con- 
gregational Church  of  that  city. 

Mr.  Kelly  died  at  his  home  in  Superior,  January  6,  1916, 
after  a  week's  illness  from  pneumonia.  His  body  was  taken 
to  Rhinebeck,  N.  Y.,  for  burial. 

He  was  married  September  25,  1873,  in  New  Haven, 
Conn.,  to  Mabel  McClellan,  daughter  of  Professor  Ben- 
jamin Silliman  (B.A.  1837)  ^^^  Susan  Huldah  (Forbes) 
Silliman  and  sister  of  his  classmate,  Benjamin  Silliman. 
She  survives  him  with  five  children:  Robert  (B.A.  1896)  ; 
WilHam,  a  non-graduate  member  of  the  Class  of  1897  S., 
who  graduated  from  West  Point  in  1899;  Mabel  (Mrs, 
Philip  Glezen  Stratton  of  Superior)  ;  Faith,  who  married 
James  Madison  Kennedy,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1907, 
and  Eleanor  Rogers.  Their  third  son,  Trumbull,  died  in 
November,  1900,  five  months  after  his  graduation  from  the 
Scientific  School,  and  a  daughter.  Arietta,  at  the  age  of 
three  years.  Mr.  Kelly  was  a  brother  of  William  Kelly 
(B.A.  1874,  E.M.  Columbia  1877)  and  a  brother-in-law  of 
Arthur  Williams  Wright  (B.A.  1859,  Ph.D.  1861),  a  sketch 
of  whose  life  appears  elsewhere  in  the  present  volume;   of 


1870  79 

William  R.  Belknap,  who  graduated  from  the  Scientific 
School  in  1869,  and  of  William  A.  Rogers  (Ph.B.  1874). 
William  Belknap  and  William  S.  Rogers,  graduates  of  the 
College  in  1908  and  1910,  respectively,  are  his  nephews. 


Frank  Vincent,  B.A.  1870 

Born  April  2,  1848,  in  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 
Died  June  20,  1916,  in  Woodstock,  N.  Y. 

Frank  Vincent,  son  of  Frank  and  Harriet  (Barns) 
Vincent,  was  born  in  Brooklyn,  N.  Y.,  April  2^  1848.  He 
received  his  early  education  in  the  Peekskill  (N.  Y.)  Mili- 
tary Academy,  and  entered  Yale  with  the  Class  of  1870, 
but  owing  to  ill  health  left  at  the  end  of  the  second  term 
of  Freshman  year.  He  returned  in  the  fall  of  1867,  but  was 
again  compelled  to  discontinue  his  studies  after  a  short 
period.  He  was  a  member  of  Brothers  in  Unity.  In  1875, 
Yale  conferred  the  honorary  degree  of  M.A.  upon  him,  and 
he  was  later  enrolled  with  his  Class. 

His  life  was  devoted  to  travel  and  to  literary  pursuits. 
He  is  said  to  be  the  first  man  to  have  made  a  systematic 
tour  of  the  world.  He  made  explorations  into  Indo- 
China,  Lapland,  Brazil,  the  Congo  Free  State,  Micronesia, 
and  Melanesia — the  Fiji,  Solomon,  Gilbert,  Marshall,  and 
Ladrone  islands, — Papua  or  New  Guinea,  and  Borneo.  Of 
all  his  discoveries,  that  of  the  ruins  of  Cambodia  attracted 
the  most  attention.  On  his  tours,  he  collected  many  rare 
articles  of  artistic  and  industrial  interest,  and  some  years 
ago  presented  to  the  Metropolitan  Museum  of  Art  a  valu- 
able collection  of  Indo-Chinese  antiquities.  Among  the 
books  of  which  he  was  the  author  were:  "The  Land  of 
the  White  Elephant"  (1874)  ;  "Through  and  Through  the 
Tropics"  (1876);  "Norsk,  Lapp  and  Finn"  (1881)  ; 
"Actual  Africa"  (1895),  and  "The  Animal  World"  (1897). 
He  was  widely  read,  having,  in  fact,  in  1905  fulfilled  a 
resolve  made  at  the  age  of  seventeen  to  systematically 
survey  the  entire  field  of  literature,  science,  and  art  in  all 
nations,  ancient  and  modern,  confining  himself,  however,  to 
the  famous  standard  and  epoch-making  books.  In  recogni- 
tion of  his  work  as  an  explorer  and  writer,  Mr,  Vincent 
had  been  made  an  honorary  member  of  twenty-six  scientific 


BfO  YALE    COLLEGE 

and  literary  societies  in  this  country  and  abroad,  and  had 
received  decorations  from  sovereigns  and  governments  in 
Europe,  Asia,  Africa,  and  South  America. 

In  recent  years,  Mr.  Vincent  had  made  his  home  in  New 
York  City.  He  died  in  Woodstock,  N.  Y.,  June  20,  1916, 
after  a  short  ilhiess,  and  was  buried  in  Sleepy  Hollow 
Cemetery  at  Tarrytown,  N.  Y. 

He  was  married  June  3,  1909,  to  a  distant  cousin,  Harriet 
S.  Vincent,  who  survives  him  without  children. 


Edgar  David  Coonley,  B.A.   187 1 

Born  July  12,  1844,  in  Greenville,  N.  Y. 
Died  February  9,  1916,  in  Port  Richmond,  N.  Y. 

Edgar  David  Coonley,  son  of  Frederick  Coonley,  a 
farmer,  and  Eliza  (Griffen)  Coonley  and  grandson  of  Jacob 
and  Elizabeth  (Ham)  Coonley,  was  born  in  Greenville, 
N.  Y.,  July  12,  1844.  On  the  paternal  side,  he  was  of 
German  descent,  his  ancestors  having  settled  in  Dutchess 
County,  New  York,  in  1760,  His  mother's  parents  were 
Henry  and  Mary  (Mosher)  Griffen.  Members  of  the 
Griffen  family  came  from  England  to  America  in  1653. 

In  the  fall  of  1864,  having  spent  the  first  twenty  years  of 
his  life  on  his  father's  farm,  he  enlisted  in  the  Ninety-first 
Regiment,  New  York  Volunteers,  and  was  sent  to  Balti- 
more, Md.,  where  he  remained  until  the  Civil  War  ended, 
doing  provost  marshal  duty,  but  seeing  no  actual  service. 
After  his  discharge,  he  entered  the  Hudson  River  Institute, 
Claverack,  N.  Y.,  where  he  studied  for  nearly  two  years  in 
preparation  for  his  entrance  to  Yale.  He  received  Dispute 
appointments  in  Junior  and  Senior  years  in  college,  where 
he  was  for  two  years  a  member  of  the  University  Crew. 

After  staying  at  home  for  some  time  following  his  gradu- 
ation, Mr.  Coonley  spent  four  years  in  teaching, — during 
1871-72  at  Coxsackie,  N.  Y.,  the  next  year  at  Greenville, 
and  from  1873  to  1875  at  Claverack.  He  then  took  up  the 
study  of  medicine  at  the  College  of  Physicians  and  Sur- 
geons, making  his  home  at  Rahway,  N.  J.  After  his  grad- 
uation from  Columbia  in  1877,  he  moved  to  Mariner 
Harbor,  N.  Y.,  where  he  practiced  for  thirteen  years. 


1870-1871  8 1 

Since  that  time  he  had  resided  at  Port  Richmond,  N.  Y., 
where  he  died  February  9,  1916.  His  health  began  to  fail 
in  1902  after  an  automobile  accident  resulting  in  internal 
injuries  and  a  fracture  of  his  left  shoulder  and  elbow,  and 
in  the  hope  of  recovering  his  customary  strength  and 
energy  he  bought  a  small  place  in  Greenville,  where  he  spent 
the  summer  during  the  last  few  years  of  his  life.  In  the 
spring  of  19 13,  he  contracted  pneumonia,  principally  due  to 
his  over-worked  condition,  and  from  that  illness  he  never 
fully  recovered.  For  the  last  three  years  of  his  life,  he  was 
obliged  to  practically  retire  from  the  active  work  of  his 
profession.  In  the  search  of  health,  he  spent  one  summer 
in  Maine,  the  following  winter  in  the  South,  and  the  winter 
of  1914  in  southern  California,  where  he  became  very  ill 
with  heart  trouble,  and  was  brought  home  in  the  fall  entirely 
unconscious. 

Dr.  Coonley  was  a  trustee  of  Grace  Methodist  Episcopal 
Church  of  Port  Richmond.  He  was  married  January  2, 
1873,  in  Warwick,  N.  Y.,  to  Amelia,  daughter  of  Thomas  E. 
and  Mary  Ellen  (Booth)  Durland.  She  survives  him  with 
three  children:  Frederick  (B. A.  1896,  M.D.  1900);  Mary 
Ellen,  who  graduated  from  Wellesley  in  1899  and  who  was 
married  in  1906  to  William  Standish  Gaylord,  a  graduate 
of  Yale  with  the  degree  of  B.A.  in  1896,  and  Carl,  a  non- 
graduate  member  of  the  Sheffield  Class  of  1904.  Dr. 
Coonley  was  a  second  cousin  of  Oscar  S.  Pulman,  Jr.  (B.A. 
1900,  Ph.D.  1903). 


Isaac  Henry  Ford,  B.A.   1871 

Born  October  30,  1845,  in  North  East,  Md. 
Died  February  26,  1916,  in  Washing-ton,  D.  C. 

Isaac  Henry  Ford  was  born  at  North  East,  Cecil  County, 
Md.,  October  30,  1845,  being  one  of  the  eleven  children  of 
John  and  Elizabeth  (Simpers)  Ford.  His  father,  a  mer- 
chant, farmer,  and  local  preacher  in  the  Methodist  Episcopal 
Church,  was  descended  on  the  paternal  side  from  Richard 
Ford,  who  came  to  this  country  from  England  in  the  seven- 
teenth century  and  settled  on  the  Elk  River  in  Cecil  County ; 
Charles  Ford,  the  latter's  son,  served  in  the  militia  of  Lord 
Baltimore  and  of  King  George  III  in  Cecil  County  and  on 


82  YALE    COLLEGE 

the  frontier  in  the  French  and  Indian  wars.  On  the  mater- 
nal side,  Mr.  Ford  traced  his  descent  from  Francis 
Mauldin,  who  came  from  Wales  in  1684,  receiving  an 
original  land  grant  of  fifteen  hundred  acres  in  Maryland, 
where,  in  1721,  he  was  commissioner  of  Bohemia  Manor 
and  justice  of  the  court  of  Cecil  County.  Other  ancestors 
were  Capt.  John  Ford,  an  officer  in  the  Revolution,  whose 
wife  was  Millicent  (Hyland)  Ford,  great-granddaughter 
of  Col.  John  Hyland,  who  resigned  his  commission  in  the 
English  Army  and  emigrated  to  America  about  1664,  taking 
up  a  large  grant  in  Cecil  County,  and  Charles  Tilden  Ford, 
who,  with  three  of  his  brothers,  was  in  arms  against  the 
British  in  1812.  Isaac  Ford's  mother  was  of  English  origin, 
her  paternal  ancestor,  John  Simpers,  having  come  about 
1697  from  Liverpool  to  Port  Deposit,  Md.  She  was  the 
daughter  of  John  Simpers,  2d,  and  Margaret  (Crouch) 
Simpers  and  the  granddaughter  of  John  and  Martha  (Nash) 
Simpers. 

He  spent  his  youth  at  North  East,  Md.,  assisting  with  the 
work  on  his  father's  farms  and  attending  public  and  private 
schools.  He  received  his  preparatory  training  at  the  Fort 
Edward  (N.  Y.)  Collegiate  Institute  and  at  the  Connecticut 
Literary  Institution  at  Suffield.  In  college,  he  was  com- 
modore of  the  Yale  Navy  and  a  member  of  the  Wooden 
Spoon  Committee.  He  received  the  degree  of  LL.B.  from 
the  School  of  Law  in  1873,  two  years  after  his  graduation 
from  the  College,  being  awarded  at  the  same  time  the 
Jewell  prize  for  an  essay  on  Legal  Fictions.  Throughout 
his  law  course,  he  was  on  the  staff  of  the  New  Haven 
Palladium. 

From  October,  1873,  until  1892,  he  was  engaged  in  the 
practice  of  his  profession  at  Washington,  D.  C.,  having 
been  admitted  to  the  city  courts,  and  subsequently  to  the 
United  States  Court  of  Claims  and  the  Supreme  Court  of 
the  United  States.  From  1892  to  1899,  he  resided  in  North 
East,  superintending  and  taking  part  in  his  farming  opera- 
tions. His  brother,  Charles,  having  died  in  April,  1899, 
and  having  made  Mr.  Ford  his  executor,  he  returned  to 
Washington  and  continued  his  business, — that  of  real  estate 
and  the  manufacturing  of  bricks, — tmtil  1908,  when,  after 
having  modernized  the  family  home  at  North  East,  he  made 
it  his  home,  residing  in  Washington  only  during  the  winter 
months. 


i87i  83 

Among  the  organizations  of  which  Mr.  Ford  was  a  mem- 
ber were  the  American  Academy  of  PoHtical  and  Social 
Science,  the  Sons  of  the  American  Revolution,  and  the 
Maryland  Historical  Society.  In  The  Patriotic  Marylander 
for  June,  191 5,  is  published  an  article  by  him,  entitled 
"Early  Cecil."  He  was  a  liberal  contributor  to  the  Metho- 
dist Episcopal  Church  at  North  East,  but  was  not  a  mem- 
ber. In  1896,  he  served  as  a  member  of  the  Committee  of 
Public  Safety  of  Cecil  County.  He  took  part  in  several 
political  campaigns,  being  a  candidate  for  the  Legislature 
in  1896,  and  for  twelve  years  served  as  president  of  the 
Fifth  District  Republican  Club.  In  191 1,  he  was  again  a 
candidate  for  the  Legislature,  and  in  19 12  a  candidate  for 
presidential  elector.  He  was  active  in  the  affairs  of  the 
Yale  Alumni  Association  of  Washington,  at  one  time  serv- 
ing on  its  executive  committee,  and  was  the  last  surviving 
charter  member. 

His  death  occurred  at  his  residence  in  Washington,  Feb- 
ruary 26,  1916,  after  an  illness  of  several  months  due  to 
cirrhosis  of  the  liver.  Burial  was  in  the  Methodist  Episcopal 
Cemetery  in  his  native  town.  To  the  Maryland  Historical 
Society  and  the  Maryland  Society  of  the  Daughters  of  the 
American  Revolution,  Mr.  Ford  left  legacies. 

He  was  unmarried,  and  is  survived  by  a  sister.  Miss 
Sarali  Mauldin  Ford,  who  studied  at  Wesleyan  Female 
College,  Wilmington,  Del.,  in  1865-66.  Two  of  Mr.  Ford's 
brothers,  Samuel  Ford  and  Wilbur  Fisk  Ford,  attended 
Dickinson  College. 


Cortlandt  Wood,  B.A.   1871 

Born  May  17,  1850,  in  Plainfield,  Conn. 
Died  January  17,  1916,  in  Boston,  Mass. 

Cortlandt  Wood  was  born  May  17,  1850,  in  Plainfield, 
Conn.,  the  son  of  Darius  Wood,  whose  parents  were  Levi 
and  Sarah  (Randall)  Wood.  His  mother  was  Clarinda 
Eleanor,  daughter  of  Samuel  and  Alice  Eleanor  (Guild) 
Burlingame.  Receiving  his  preparatory  training  at  Phillips 
Academy,  Andover,  Mass.,  he  entered  Yale  in  the  fall  of 
1867,  and  was  graduated  four  years  later. 


84  YALE    COLLEGE 

An  attack  of  typhoid  fever  kept  him  from  taking  up  the 
study  of  the  law,  which  he  had  decided  to  enter  as  a  pro- 
fession, until  December,  1871,  when  he  entered  the  law 
office  of  Bacon  &  Aldrich  in  Worcester,  Mass.  He  con- 
tinued there  for  about  a  year,  completing  his  studies  at 
Boston  University  in  1873,  when  he  received  the  degree 
of  LL.B.  He  then  opened  a  law  office  at  Webster,  Mass., 
which  was  his  home  during  his  college  course  and  where 
his  father  was  engaged  in  business  as  a  merchant.  With 
the  exception  of  six  months  in  Europe  in  1876,  he  practiced 
there  until  1881,  when  he  went  to  Watertown,  S.  Dak.  In 
addition  to  practicing  law  in  that  town,  he  represented  a 
large  Scottish  loan  company. 

In  1896,  he  returned  from  the  Northwest,  and  had  since 
made  his  home  in  Boston,  Mass.,  engaged  in  the  practice 
of  his  profession.  He  died  in  that  city,  after  a  long  period 
of  ill  health,  January  17,  1916,  from  pneumonia,  which  fol- 
lowed an  attack  of  grippe.  His  body  was  cremated.  Mr. 
Wood  had  never  married. 


Clarence  Degrand  Ashley,  B.A.   1873 

Born  July  4,  185 1,  in  Boston,  Mass. 
Died  January  26,  1916,  in  New  York  City 

Clarence  Degrand  Ashley  was  born  in  Boston,  Mass., 
July  4,  1 85 1.  He  was  the  son  of  Ossian  Doolittle  Ashley, 
who  conducted  a  banking  business  in  New  York  City  and 
who,  when  the  Civil  War  broke  out,  volunteered  and 
became  colonel  of  the  Thirty-seventh  New  York  Regiment 
(now  the  Seventy-first).  After  the  war,  he  turned  his 
attention  to  railroads,  and  later  became  president  of  the 
Wabash  Railway  Company.  His  father  was  Lucius  Doo- 
little, son  of  Benjamin  Doolittle,  who  served  in  the  Revolu- 
tion, and  a  descendant  of  Rev.  Benjamin  DooHttle  (B.A. 
1716)  ;  his  mother,  Seraph  (Ashley)  Doolittle,  was  the 
daughter  of  Major  Daniel  Ashley  of  the  Revolutionary 
Army,  whose  father  was  Col.  Samuel  Ashley,  one  of  the 
original  grantees  of  Winchester,  N.  H.,  who  traced  his 
lineage  back  to  the  English  family  of  Ashleys  of  whom 
Lord  Ashley,  later  the  Earl  of  Shaftesbury,  was  a  noted 


1871-1873  85 

member;  by  a  family  arrangement,  their  children  were 
called  by  the  mother's  name.  Clarence  D.  Ashley's  mother 
was  Harriet  Amelia,  daughter  of  Joseph  and  Hai;riet 
(Pierce)  Nash,  the  latter's  parents  being  Abraham  and 
Lois  (Davenport)  Pierce. 

In  1858,  his  family  removed  to  New  York  City,  and  he 
attended  private  schools  in  that  city,  entering  Phillips  Acad- 
emy, Andover,  Mass.,  in  1866.  In  college,  he  played  on 
the  football  team  that  defeated  Columbia,  and  served  on 
the  Senior  Promenade  Committee. 

The  first  two  years  after  graduation  he  spent  in  New 
York  City,  gaining  business  experience  in  a  banker's  office 
and  also  giving  some  time  to  tutoring.  He  went  abroad 
in  the  summer  of  1875,  and  after  giving  his  attention  to  the 
study  of  German  for  a  while,  studied  law  and  history  for 
two  years  at  the  University  of  Berlin.  Mr.  Ashley  returned 
to  New  York  in  July,  1878,  and  the  following  fall  entered 
the  Columbia  Law  School,  where  he  received  the  degree 
of  LL.B.  in  1880.  During  his  course,  he  was  in  the  law 
office  of  Scudder  &  Carter  in  New  York,  and  upon  his 
admission  to  the  bar  he  formed  a  partnership  with  William 
A.  Keener  (B.A.  Emory  1874,  LL.B.  Harvard  1877),  who 
later  became  dean  of  the  Columbia  Law  School.  The 
partnership  continued  until  June,  1883,  and  then,  after  four 
years  of  independent  practice,  Mr.  Ashley  became  a  mem- 
ber of  the  firm  of  Dixon,  Williams  &  Ashley,  in  which  his 
associates  were  Edward  H.  Dixon  (LL.B.  Columbia  1873) 
and  Mornay  Williams,  a  graduate  of  that  institution  with 
the  degrees  of  B.A.  and  LL.B.  in  1878  and  1880,  respec- 
tively. Many  years  later,  he  became  a  member  of  the 
firm  of  Ashley,  Emley  &  Rubine. 

Mr.  Ashley  was  keenly  interested  in  the  problems  and 
methods  of  legal  education,  and  was  himself  a  teacher  of 
marked  ability,  bringing  to  such  work  his  heart-whole 
interest.  He  never  left  any  point  in  doubt,  and  insisted  on 
clear  thinking.  When  he  met  Abner  C.  Thomas  (later 
judge  of  the  Surrogate's  Court  in  New  York),  and  found 
him  eager  to  establish  a  night  school  for  the  study  of  law, 
Mr.  Ashley  threw  himself  into  the  plan  with  zest,  and 
together  he  and  Judge  Thomas  organized  the  Metropolis 
Law  School  in  1891,  Mr.  Ashley  becoming  a  member  of 
the  Faculty,  and  one  of  its  trustees.  The  School  was  a 
pronounced  success,  and  was  one  of  the  first  institutions 


86  YALE    COLLEGE 

to  adopt  the  so-called  Langdell  or  Case  System  of  teaching 
law — a  method  now  almost  universal.  It  was  at  this  time 
that  Mr.  Ashley  began  to  specialize  on  the  Law  of  Con- 
tracts, and  prepared  his  first  book  on  Cases  for  the  use  of 
his  classes.  Among  the  first  graduates  of  the  School  was 
Frank  H.  Sommer,  who  has  been  chosen  by  New  York 
University  to  succeed  Mr.  Ashley  as  dean  of  its  Law  School. 

In  1895,  the  Metropolis  was  consolidated  with  the  New 
York  University  Law  School,  and  Mr.  Ashley  was  made 
professor  of  law  and  vice  dean  of  the  Faculty  in  charge 
of  the  evening  division.  The  following  year,  he  became 
dean  with  full  charge  of  the  Law  School.  At  this  time, 
he  gave  up  the  practice  of  law  and  devoted  all  his  energy 
to  the  school  and  the  problem  of  legal  education.  To  Mr. 
Ashley  must  be  given  the  credit  of  establishing  evening 
legal  education  in  New  York  City  and  maintaining  it  upon 
a  high  and  permanent  basis  in  spite  of  much  opposition. 
One  of  the  notable  features  of  the  New  York  University 
Law  School  under  Mr.  Ashley's  deanship  was  the  admis- 
sion of  women  to  all  classes  on  equal  terms  with  men. 
From  1899  to  1909,  he  served  as  non-resident  lecturer  on 
law  at  Bryn  Mawr  College. 

Mr.  Ashley  made  a  thorough  study  of  the  Law  of  Con- 
tracts, and  was  a  recognized  authority  on  the  subject.  His 
book,  "The  Law  of  Contracts,"  published  in  191 1  was 
widely  reviewed,  and  has  caused  much  discussion.  In  some 
respects  his  views  differed  from  those  of  Langdell  and 
other  authorities,  and  he  was  in  constant  correspondence 
with  all  the  best-known  students  on  the  subject,  such  as 
Pollock  of  England,  one  of  the  authors  of  Pollock  and 
Maitland's  "History  of  English  Law."  Mr.  Ashley  was 
a  constant  contributor  to  the  Harvard  Law  Reviezv,  the 
Yale  Law  Review,  the  Columbia  Law  Review  and  many 
others  throughout  the  country.  In  1895,  New  York  Uni- 
versity conferred  an  honorary  LL.M.  upon  him  and  eight 
years  later  that  of  J.D.,  and  he  also  held  the  degree  of 
Doctor  of  Laws,  received  at  Miami  in  1898.  Dean  Ashley 
was  a  member  of  the  New  York  City  Bar  Association,  and 
for  many  years  served  upon  its  legislative  committee.  He 
belonged  also  to  the  New  York  State  Bar  Association,  the 
New  York  County  Lawyers  Association,  and  the  American 
Bar  Association.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Century  Club 
and  the  New  England  vSociety. 


i873  87 

His  death,  due  to  a  blood  clot  which  reached  the  heart, 
occurred  suddenly,  January  26,  1916,  at  his  home  in  New 
York  City.    He  was  buried  in  Woodlawn  Cemetery. 

Mr.  Ashley  was  married  in  Geneva,  Switzerland,  August 
12,  1880,  to  Isabella  Heyward,  daughter  of  Daniel  C.  Ripley 
and  Sarah  (Trumbull)  Ripley,  a  direct  descendant  of 
Jonathan  Trumbull.  She  survives  him  with  two  children, 
Edith  Heyward  and  Mabel  Pierce.  The  former  is  a  non- 
graduate  member  of  the  Class  of  1905  at  Bryn  Mawr 
College,  while  the  latter  took  the  degree  of  B.A.  there  in 
1910. 


Solomon  Carrington  Minor,  B.A.   1873 

Born  June  4,  1850,  in  Waterbury,  Conn. 
Died  June  16,  1916,  in  New  York  City 

Solomon  Carrington  Minor  was  born  in  Waterbury, 
Conn.,  June  4,  1850.  His  father,  Solomon  Benedict  Minor, 
was  interested  in  various  mercantile  and  manufacturing 
enterprises  in  Waterbury,  where  he  served  as  town  clerk 
from  1841  to  1847 ;  he  was  descended  from  Thomas  Minor, 
who  came  to  New  England  in  John  Winthrop's  company 
in  1630,  and  from  Capt.  John  Minor,  a  man  prominent  in 
the  early  history  of  Woodbury,  Conn.  Through  his  descent 
from  Capt.  Matthew  Minor  of  Woodbury,  he  was  related 
to  Matthew  Minor  (B.A.  1801)-,  whose  son,  Samuel,  gradu- 
ated from  the  College  in  1844.  His  mother  was  Cynthia 
Adeline,  daughter  of  Solomon  and  Cynthia  (Cook) 
Carrington. 

Before  entering  Yale  in  1868,  he  attended  the  Water- 
bury High  School,  Williston  Academy  at  Williston,  Vt., 
Parker  Academy  in  Woodbury,  and  Phillips-Andover.  He 
withdrew  from  college  at  the  end  of  Sophomore  year  on 
account  of  ill  health,  but  returned  in  the  fall  of  1871,  com- 
pleting his  work  with  the  Class  of  1873. 

Until  1889,  Mr.  Minor  was  engaged  in  teaching,  being 
principal  successively  of  the  Naugatuck  (Conn.)  High 
School,  the  grammar  school  at  Union  City,  a  part  of  the 
town  of  Naugatuck,  and  of  the  Greeneville  Schools  of  Nor- 
wich, Conn.,  his  period  of  service  in  the  latter  place  cov- 
ering twelve  and  a  half  years. 


88  YALE    COLLEGE 

In  the  fall  of  1889,  he  turned  his  attention  to  the  study 
of  medicine,  and  in  1892  was  graduated  from  New  York 
University  with  the  degree  of  M.D.  He  stood  at  the  head 
of  his  Class,  and  in  a  competitive  contest,  was  selected  to 
deliver  the  valedictory  address.  After  serving  an  interne- 
ship  on  the  surgical  staff  of  Bellevue  Hospital,  New  York 
City,  he  opened  offices  in  that  city,  where  he  continued  in 
practice  until  his  death,  although  in  the  past  few  years 
he  had,  because  of  ill  health,  been  compelled  to  gradually 
relinquish  the  more  arduous  duties  of  his  profession.  He 
was  a  member  of  the  Charity  Organization  Society  of 
New  York  City  and  of  several  medical  organizations,  in 
1909  being  chosen  president  of  the  Bronx  Medical  Asso- 
ciation. In  1899,  he  was  ordained  a  deacon  in  the  Catholic 
Apostolic  Church,  and  served  in  that  capacity  until  his 
death. 

Dr.  Minor  died  at  Lincoln  Hospital,  New  York  City, 
June  16,  1916,  from  a  complication  of  diseases.  Burial 
was  in  Riverside  Cemetery,  Waterbury. 

He  was  married  June  30,  1877,  in  Union  City  to  Florence 
Anna,  daughter  of  William  S.  and  Lurissa  Jane  (Carlton) 
Kelly,  who  died  September  22,  191 1.  They  had  three 
children:  Arthur  Carlton,  whose  death  occurred  in  1884; 
Walter  Theodore,  who  died  in  1883,  and  Mabel  Theodora, 
who  survives.  He  leaves  also  three  sisters,  two  of  whom, 
Emily  Terry  Minor  and  Mary  Root  Minor,  are  members  of 
the  Mount  Holyoke  Class  of  1880,  although  the  latter  did 
not  receive  a  degree  there.    • 


James  Adam  Robson,  B.A.   1873 

Born  January  i,  1851,  in  Gorham,  N.  Y. 
Died  February  i,  1916,  in  Gorham,  N.  Y. 

James  Adam  Robson  was  born  January  i,  1851,  in 
Gorham,  N.  Y.,  his  father  being  John  Robson,  a  farmer, 
who  represented  Ontario  County  in  the  State  Assembly 
of  1879;  the  latter's  parents  were  James  and  Anne  (Hes- 
lope)  Robson,  and  he  was  descended  from  John  Robson, 
who  came  to  Gorham  from  England  in  1816.  His  mother 
was  Isabella,  daughter  of  Adam  and  Jane  (Heslope)  Telfer 
of  Telfer,  Ontario,  Canada. 


i873  89 

He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  the  Cananclaigua  (N.  Y.) 
Academy,  and  in  college  received  High  Oration  appoint- 
ments and  an  election  to  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 

Mr.  Robson  entered  the  Columbia  Law  School  in  1874, 
having  spent  the  previous  year  at  his  home.  He  received 
his  LL.B.  in  1876,  and  in  October  of  that  year  took  up 
practice  in  Canandaigua,  where  he  followed  his  profession 
as  a  lawyer  until  his  appointment  as  a  justice  of  the 
Supreme  Court  of  New  York  State  in  1903.  The  next 
year,  he  was  elected  to  that  office,  being  designated  as  a 
justice  of  the  appellate  division  and  assigned  to  the  fourth 
department,  and,  by  reappointment,  continued  on  the  bench 
until  his  death  at  the  family  home  at  Gorham,  N.  Y.,  Febru- 
ary I,  1916,  after  a  six  weeks'  illness  from  cirrhosis  of  the 
liver.    He  was  buried  in  Gorham. 

Judge  Robson  was  a  trustee  of  the  Clifton  Springs 
(N.  Y.)  Sanitarium.  He  was  unmarried,  and  is  survived 
by  four  sisters. 


William  Henry  Whittaker,  B.A.   1873 

Born  August  11,  1853,  in  Covington,  Ky. 
Died  November  5,  1915,  in  Cincinnati,  Ohio 

William  Henry  Whittaker  was  born  in  Covington,  Ky., 
August  II,  1853,  the  son  of  James  Whittaker,  a  merchant. 
His  mother  was  Olivia,  daughter  of  Dr.  James  Lyon  and 
Mary  Lyon  of  Frederick  City,  Md.  Receiving  his  prepara- 
tory training  at  the  Hughes  High  School  in  Cincinnati, 
Ohio,  in  1869  he  entered  Yale,  where  he  received  a  Dis- 
sertation Junior  and  a  Dispute  Senior  appointment. 

He  spent  the  two  years  after  graduation  as  a  reporter 
for  the  Cincinnati  Enquirer,  but  in  1875  he  went  to  Chi- 
cago, 111.,  where,  while  reading  law  in  the  offices  of  Pad- 
dock &  Ide  and  attending  the  Union  College  of  Law,  he 
worked  on  the  Evening  Post  and  the  Times.  He  was  sent 
to  Europe  in  July,  1877,  ^s  a  correspondent  for  the  Cin- 
cinnati Enquirer,  remaining  until  September  of  the  follow- 
ing year,  and  during  this  period  he  studied  law  for  nine 
months  at  the  University  of  Heidelberg,  and  visited  other 
parts  of  Germany,  as  well  as  Italy  and  Switzerland.  Since 
his  return  to  Cincinnati  in  the  fall  of  1878,  he  had  prac- 


QO  YALE    COLLEGE 

ticed  in  that  city.  He  was  appointed  assistant  corporation 
counsel  in  January,  1891,  and  served  in  that  capacity  for 
the  next  six  years.  He  was  considered  an  authority  on 
bankruptcy  law,  and  had  been  referee  in  bankruptcy  for 
Hamilton  County  since  1898.  His  writings  on  subjects 
connected  with  his  profession  had  been  numerous,  and 
included  "The  Annotated  Ohio  Code  of  Civil  Procedure," 
"The  Annotated  Ohio  Probate  Code,"  "The  Ohio  Code  of 
Evidence,"  and  "Forms  of  Pleading  under  the  Codes  of 
Civil  Procedure,"  the  latter  being  published  in  two  volumes. 
For  a  time,  he  edited  the  Weekly  Law  Bulletin. 

He  belonged  to  the  Methodist  Church  of  Avondale,  Cin- 
cinnati. Since  1910,  he  had  served  as  professor  of  torts  at 
the  Young  Men's  Christian  Association  Law  School,  and 
while  delivering  a  lecture  to  a  class  on  the  evening  of 
November  5,  191 5,  suffered  an  attack  of  heart  failure,  and 
died  almost  instantly.  He  was  buried  in  Spring  Grove 
Cemetery  in  Cincinnati. 

He  was  married  in  Camden,  Ohio,  August  17,  1893,  to 
Carrie  A.,  daughter  of  Benjamin  F.  and  Nancy  M.  Gardner, 
by  whom  he  is  survived.  They  had  one  son,  William 
Russell,  who  died  on  January  19,  1902.  Mr.  Whittaker's 
nephews,  James  M.  and  Wallace  S.  Whittaker,  are  gradu- 
ates of  Yale,  the  former  being  a  member  of  the  College 
Class  of  1909  and  the  latter  of  the  Sheffield  Class  of  1914. 
They  are  sons  of  his  brother,  James  T.  Whittaker  (B.A. 
Miami  1863,  M.D.  University  of  Pennsylvania  1866). 
Another  brother,  Horace  S.  Whittaker,  graduated  from 
Miami  in  1868. 


Frank  Wade  Foster,  B.A.   1874 

Born  October  30,  1852,  in  Bibb  County,  Ga. 
Died  November  25,  1914,  in  Atlanta,  Ga. 

Frank  Wade  Foster  was  born  October  30,  1852,  in  Bibb 
County,  Georgia,  the  son  of  Albert  Gallatin  Foster,  an  attor- 
ney at  law,  and  Caroline  (Colbert)  Foster.  Through  his 
father,  whose  parents  were  Arthur  and  Hannah  (Johnson) 
Foster,  he  was  descended  from  Revolutionary  stock,  his 
earliest  American  ancestors  having  settled  in  North  Caro- 
lina.    His   mother   was    the    daughter   of    Frederick    and 


1 873-1 876  91 

Temperance  (Powers)  Colbert  and  a  descendant  of  Major 
John  Powers,  who  emigrated  from  Ireland  to  Georgia  and 
served  as  an  officer  under  Washington. 

He  was  fitted  for  college  at  Phillips  (Andover)  Acad- 
emy, and  at  Yale  was  for  two  years  a  member  of  the 
University  Baseball  Team. 

Mr.  Foster  returned  to  his  native  state  after  graduating, 
and  for  six  months  managed  a  plantation  near  Macon.  In 
January,  1875,  he  was  appointed  a  deputy  collector  of 
internal  revenue,  and  while  serving  in  this  capacity  for  the 
next  five  years  made  his  headquarters  successively  at  Mill- 
edgeville.  Savannah,  and  at  Augusta.  On  September  i, 
1880,  he  entered  'the  cotton  commission  business  in  Augusta 
under  the  firm  name  of  McCord  &  Foster.  Three  years 
later,  his  partner  retired,  and  until  April,  1887,  Mr.  Foster 
continued  the  business  alone.  At  that  time,  he  formed,  with 
Mr.  Joshua  Doughty  the  firm  of  Foster  &  Doughty,  which 
was  merged  five  years  afterwards  with  the  Augusta  Cotton 
&  Compress  Company.  On  the  liquidation  of  this  cor- 
poration in  1899,  Mr.  Foster  settled  in  Buckhead,  Ga.  For 
seven  years,  he  was  manager  of  the  Buckhead  Ginning  & 
Milling  Company,  but  after  1906  gave  his  whole  attention 
to  farming.  While  living  in  Augusta,  he  served  as  a  mem- 
ber of  the  City  Council  for  one  term  (1895)  and  for  several 
years  as  president  of  the  Commercial  Club. 

His  death  occurred  November  25,  1914,  in  Atlanta,  Ga., 
after  a  prolonged  illness  due  to  Bright's  disease.  He  was 
buried  in  Madison,  Ga. 

He  was  married  in  Augusta,  February  2,  1882,  to  Mary 
Clanton,    daughter    of    William    J.    and    Anne    (Clanton) 
Vason,  who  survives  him  with  their  daughter,  Annie  Clan 
ton  (Foster)  Leggett,  of  New  York  City. 


William  Nimick  Frew,  B.A.   1876 

Born  July  10,  1854,  in  Pittsburgh,  Pa. 
Died  October  28,  1915,  in  Pittsburgh,  Pa. 

William  Nimick  Frew,  son  of  William  Frew,  was  born 
July  10,  1854,  in  Pittsburgh,  Pa.,  being  a  descendant  of 
Samuel  Frew,  who  came  to  America  from  Ireland  about 
1800   and   settled   in   Western    Pennsylvania.      His    father 


92  YALE    COLLEGE 

was  one  of  the  pioneers  in  the  oil  business  in  that  part  of 
the  country.  He  served  as  a  major  in  the  Pennsylvania 
Reserves  during  the  Civil  War,  and  was  active  in  hospital 
work,  the  early  undertakings  of  the  Young  Men's  Chris- 
tian Association,  and  in  the  philanthropic  movements  of 
his  day.  William  N.  Frew's  mother,  Martha  E.  (Long) 
Frew,  was  of  old  Quaker  stock. 

Before  entering  Yale,  he  attended  Newell's  Academy,  the 
Western  University  of  Pennsylvania  (now  the  University 
of  Pittsburgh),  and  Phillips  Academy,  Andover,  Mass.  In 
his  Junior  year  in  college,  he  served  on  the  Class  Supper 
Committee. 

He  took  up  the  law  as  a  profession  after  graduation, 
receiving  his  preparation  in  the  office  of  Hampton  &  Dal- 
zell  of  Pittsburgh  and  at  Columbia  University,  where  he 
studied  during  1876-77.  In  April,  1879,  he  was  admitted 
to  the  bar  of  Allegheny  County,  and  immediately  began 
practice  in  Pittsburgh,  where  he  attained  remarkable 
success. 

Through  his  friendship  with  Mr.  Andrew  Carnegie, 
Mr.  Frew  became  a  director  of  the  Pittsburgh,  Bessemer 
&  Lake  Erie  Railroad  Company,  the  Iron  City  National 
Bank,  the  City  Deposit  Bank,  the  Union  Trust  Company, 
the  Mellon  National  Bank,  the  Union  Savings  Bank,  and 
the  Western  Insurance  Company.  With  Mr.  Carnegie's 
retirement  from  the  steel  business,  and  the  inauguration  of 
his  philanthropic  activities,  he  prevailed  on  Mr.  Frew  prac- 
tically to  surrender  his  entire  law  practice,  which  had  then 
become  very  lucrative,  and  to  take  up  his  charitable  enter- 
prises. In  consequence,  Mr.  Frew  was  looked  upon  as  one 
of  the  founders  of  the  great  Carnegie  Library  and  Insti- 
tute of  Pittsburgh,  in  which  he  was  for  many  years  the 
president  of  the  board  of  trustees.  He  was  also  a  director 
of  the  Carnegie  Technical  School  Commission,  a  trustee 
of  the  Carnegie  Institution  at  Washington,  the  Carnegie 
Hero  Fund  Commission,  and  of  the  Pennsylvania  College 
for  Women,  serving  for  some  time  as  secretary  of  the  board 
of  the  latter,  and  was  a  member  of  the  Pennsylvania  State 
Library  Commission  for  a  long  time.  For  four  years,  end- 
ing with  April,  1889,  he  was  a  member  of  the  Select  Council 
of  the  city  of  Pittsburgh,  and  from  1897  to  1902  was  presi- 
dent of  the  Pittsburgh  Orchestra.  He  was  a  member  of 
the  East  Liberty  Presbyterian  Church.     In  1912,  the  Uni- 


1876  93 

versity  of  Pittsburgh  conferred  the  honorary  degree  of 
LL.D.  upon  him. 

Mr.  Frew  died  at  his  home  in  Pittsburgh,  October  28, 
191 5,  and  was  buried  in  the  Allegheny  Cemetery  in  that 
city.  In  March,  1914,  he  sustained  a  fall,  from  the  effects 
of  which  he  never  fully  recovered,  and  he  had  been  con- 
fined to  his  bed  for  a  year  prior  to  his  death. 

He  was  married  January  13,  1881,  at  Pittsburgh,  to 
Emily  Wick,  daughter  of  George  A.  and  S^rah  Lippincott 
Berry,  who  survives  him  with  their  three  children:  Wil- 
liam, who  was  graduated  at  Yale  in  the  College  Class  of 
1903  and  from  the  University  of  Pittsburgh  with  the 
degree  of  LL.B.  in  1906;  Margarita,  who  was  married  in 
December,  1906,  to  Rufus  Story  Rowland  (B.A.  1906)  ; 
and  Virginia,  who  is  the  wife  of  Mr.  Thruston  Wright. 


Durbin  Home,  B.A.   1876 

Born  July  15,  1854,  in  Pittsburgh,  Pa. 
Died  May  12,  1916,  in  Pittsburgh,  Pa. 

Durbin  Home  was  born  in  Pittsburgh,  Pa.,  July  15,  1854, 
his  father  being  Joseph  Home,  son  of  John  and  Cather- 
ine (Otto)  Home  and  a  descendant  of  Henry  Home,  who 
came  to  America  in  1779  from  Bavaria,  settling  at  Bedford, 
Pa.,  and  who  served  as  a  cavalry  officer  in  Washington's 
army  during  the  Revolution.  His  mother  was  Mary  Eliza- 
beth, daughter  of  John  and  Susan  B.  (Wolff)  Shea. 
Through  her,  he  was  descended  from  George  Michael 
Wolff,  who  came  to  this  country  from  Germany  in  1739. 

Durbin  Home  was  prepared  for  Yale  at  Newell's  Acad- 
emy in  Pittsburgh  and  at  the  Hopkins  Grammar  School  in 
New  Haven,  and  while  in  college  sang  on  the  University 
Glee  Club,  and  was  a  member  of  the  Junior  Promenade 
Committee. 

Upon  graduating,  he  entered  the  dry  goods  business  with 
his  father,  who  was  then  head  of  the  firm  of  Joseph  Home 
&  Company.  In  1901,  the  firm  Was  incorporated  as  the 
Joseph  Home  Company,  and  he  was  made  president.  He 
continued  in  that  capacity  until  November,  1915,  when  he 
retired  on  account  of  failing  health.     His  death  occurred 


94  YALE    COLLEGE 

May  12,  1916,  at  his  home  in  Pittsburgh  as  the  result  of 
arterio  sclerosis,  and  he  was  buried  in  Allegheny  Cemetery 
in  that  city. 

For  a  number  of  years,  Mr.  Home  was  a  director  of  the 
Union  National  Bank  of  Pittsburgh  and  of  the  Fidelity 
Title  &  Trust  Company.  He  was  a  trustee  of  the  Carne- 
gie Institute  of  Pittsburgh  from  1905  to  1910,  and  president 
of  the  board  of  trustees  of  Allegheny  College  from  1900  to 
1908.  He  was  also  a  trustee  of  Christ  Methodist  Episcopal 
Church  of  Pittsburgh  and  a  member  of  the  Sons  of  the 
American  Revolution. 

He  was  married  in  Cincinnati,  Ohio,  May  11,  1882,  to 
Mary  Tweed,  daughter  of  Alexander  Hugh  and  Laura 
Clarissa  (VanDyke)  Andrews  and  sister  of  his  classmate, 
Frank  VanDyke  Andrews.  She  survives  him  with  one 
son,  Joseph,  who  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  at  Yale  in 
191 1.  Their  elder  son,  Durbin,  died  in  1892.  Mr.  Home's 
nephews,  Joseph  H.  Holmes  and  Nathaniel  Holmes,  2d, 
graduated  from  the  College  in  1904  and  1908,  respectively. 


William  Waldo  Hyde,  B.A.   1876 

Born  March  25,  1854,  in  Tolland,  Conn. 
Died  October  30,  1915,  in  Hartford,  Conn. 

William  Waldo  Hyde,  the  son  of  Alvan  Pinney  Hyde, 
who  graduated  from  Yale  with  the  degree  of  B.A.  in  1845, 
was  born  in  Tolland,  Conn.,  March  25,  1854.  His  mother 
was  Frances  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  Loren  Pinckney  and 
Frances  Elizabeth  (Eldridge)  Waldo.  He  was  prepared 
for  college  at  the  Hartford  (Conn.)  Public  High  School, 
and  entering  Yale  in  1872,  in  his  Sophomore  year  received 
two  second  prizes  for  excellence  in  English  composition, 
the  following  year  was  given  a  Junior  Exhibition  prize,  and 
in  Senior  year  was  awarded  an  English  composition  prize. 
His  appointments  were  Philosophical  Orations,  he  ranked 
fourth  in  his  Class  at  graduation,  when  he  was  one  of  the 
Commencement  speakers,  and  was  a  member  of  Phi  Beta 
Kappa.  He  sang  on  the  Class  Glee  Club,  and  was  on  the 
Class  Supper  Committee,  an  editor  of  the  Yale  Literary 
Magazine  in  Senior  year,  and  a  member  of  Chi  Delta  Theta. 


1876  95 

After  leaving  Yale,  Mr.  Hyde  entered  upon  the  study  of 
law  in  Hartford  in  the  offices  of  the  firm  of  Waldo,  Hubbard 
&  Hyde,  of  which  the  members  were  his  grandfather, 
Judge  Waldo,  Gov.  Richard  Dudley  Hubbard  (B.A.  1839), 
and  his  father.  He  remained  there  until  1877,  and  then 
went  to  the  Boston  University  Law  School  for  a  year's 
study.  Upon  his  return  to  Hartford,  he  became  connected 
with  his  father's  firm,  the  name  of  which  was  changed  in 
1881,  after  the  death  of  Judge  Waldo  and  when  Mr.  Hyde 
himself  was  taken  into  partnership,  to  Hubbard,  Hyde  & 
Gross.  Three  years  later  the  firm  became  known  as  Hyde, 
Gross  &  Hyde,  but  since  1894  its  business  had  been  con- 
ducted under  the  name  of  Gross,  Hyde  &  Shipman,  Mr. 
Hyde's  associates  being  his  son,  Alvan  Waldo  (B.A.  1902)  ; 
Charles  E.  Gross,  of  the  Class  of  1869,  Arthur  L.  Ship- 
man,  who  received  the  degrees  of  B.A.  and  LL.B.  at  Yale 
in  1886  and  1888,  respectively,  and  Charles  Welles  Gross 
(B.A.  1898,  LL.B.  Harvard  1901).  For  many  years,  Mr. 
Hyde  had  been  a  member  of  the  Bar  Examining  Com- 
mittee of  the  State  of  Connecticut,  and  at  the  time  of  his 
death  he  was  vice  president  of  the  State  Bar  Association. 

Although  he  had  attained  a  position  of  the  first  eminence 
in  the  Connecticut  Bar,  the  practice  of  his  profession  had 
not  absorbed  Mr.  Hyde's  entire  interest.  From  1885  to 
1891,  he  was  a  member  of  the  Board  of  School  Visitors  of 
Hartford,  and  during  that  period  was  acting  school  visitor. 
He  had  also  served  on  the  Board  of  Health,  and  for  several 
years  was  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Street  Commissioners 
of  Hartford,  for  some  time  being  president  of  the  latter. 
In  May,  1901,  he  was  appointed  corporation  counsel  for 
the  city,  a  position  which  he  held  for  two  years.  On  April 
4,  1892,  he  was  elected  mayor  of  Hartford  on  the  Demo- 
cratic ticket,  and  served  in  that  capacity  for  two  years. 
At  the  time  of  the  change  in  management  of  the  New  York, 
New  Haven  &  Hartford  Railroad  Company  in  1914,  Mr. 
Hyde  was  selected  as  one  of  the  five  trustees  appointed  to 
manage  the  trolley  systems  that  had  been  separated  from 
the  railroad  company's  management,  and  was  acting  as  such 
at  the  time  of  his  death.  He  was  a  director  of  the  Mercan- 
tile National  and  the  Dime  Savings  banks  of  Hartford,  and 
of  the  American  School  for  the  Deaf  and  Dumb  and  the 
Hartford  Library  Association,  and  was  a  trustee  of  the 
Connecticut  Hospital  for  the  Insane  at  Middletown.     He 


g6  YALE   COLLEGE 

was  a  member  of  the  Society  of  Mayflower  Descendants, 
the  Society  of  Colonial  Wars,  and  the  Sons  of  the  Ameri- 
can Revolution.    He  had  taken  several  trips  abroad. 

Mr.  Hyde's  death  occurred  very  suddenly  October  30, 
191 5,  in  Hartford,  after  an  operation  for  obstruction  of 
the  bowels.  He  was  buried  in  Cedar  Hill  Cemetery  in 
Hartford. 

He  was  married  in  that  city,  December  i,  1877,  to  Helen 
Eliza,  daughter  of  George  Wheeler  and  Eliza  Whiting 
Watson,  who  survives  him.  Two  children  were  born  to 
them :  Elizabeth  and  Alvan  Waldo.  The  son,  after  gradu- 
ating from  Yale  College  in  1902,  entered  the  Harvard  Law 
School,  where  he  received  the  degree  of  LL.B.  in  1905. 
Mr.  Hyde's  brother,  Frank  Eldridge,  graduated  from  the 
College  in  1879  and  from  the  School  of  Law  two  years 
later. 


Herbert  Stanley  Youn^,  B.A.  1876 

Born  December  7,  1853.  in  Sterling,  Conn. 
Died  January  5,  1916,  in  Norwich,  Conn. 

Herbert  Stanley  Young,  son  of  William  Potter  and  Laura 
Anthony  (Hill)  Young,  was  born  in  Sterling,  Conn., 
December  7,  1853.  His  paternal  grandparents  were  Wil- 
liam Potter  and  Mary  (Perkins)  Young.  His  mother  was 
the  daughter  of  Sheldon  and  Mercy  (Waterman)  Hill.  He 
was  prepared  for  Yale  at  the  Norwich  (Conn.)  Free  Acad- 
emy, and  received  Dispute  appointments  in  Junior  and 
Senior  years. 

During  the  first  three  years  after  his  graduation,  Mr. 
Young  taught  at  the  Antiion  (N.  Y.)  Grammar  School 
and  at  the  Columbia  Grammar  School  in  New  York  City. 
In  1879,  he  entered  the  employ  of  a  wholesale  drug  house 
of  New  York  City,  but  a  year  later  resumed  teaching  at 
Plainfield,  N.  J.  From  1884  until  1889,  he  was  principal 
of  the  New  Milford  (Conn.)  High  School.  He  then  organ- 
ized and  took  charge  of  the  Wheeler  School,  a  private 
preparatory  school  at  North  Stonington,  Conn.,  but  resigned 
that  position  in  June,  1898,  to  engage  in  the  manufacture 
of  proprietary  medicines.  From  1898  to  1901,  he  was  town 
auditor  of  North  Stonington,  and  he  also  served  as  justice 


1876-1877  97 

of  the  peace  for  several  years.  He  had  been  a  delegate 
to  various  state  and  senatorial  conventions.  His  church 
membership  was  begun  when  he  united  with  the  Church  of 
Christ  in  Yale  University,  and  he  later  served  for  a  number 
of  years  as  deacon  of  the  Congregational  Church  at  North 
Stonington.  At  the  time  of  his  death,  he  was  a  member 
of  the  Congregational  Church  of  Norwichtown,  to  which 
place  he  had  removed  in  1903,  and  where  he  afterwards 
conducted  a  general  merchandise  business,  serving  also  as 
postmaster. 

He  died  at  his  home  in  Norwich,  January  5,  1916,  of 
endocarditis  and  chronic  nephritis.  Interment  was  in  Rix- 
town  Cemetery  in  Griswold,  Conn. 

Mr.  Young's  marriage  took  place  December  24,  1884,  In 
Preston,  Conn.,  to  Louise  J.,  daughter  of  William  P.  and 
Mary  A.  (Latham)  Witter,  who  survives  him.  They  had 
no  children. 


Webster  Merrifield,  B.A.  1877 

Born  July  27,  1852,  in  Williamsville,  Vt. 
Died  January  22,  1916,  in  Pasadena,  Gal. 

Webster  Merrifield  was  born  July  27,  1852,  In  Williams- 
ville, Vt.,  his  parents  being  John  Adams  Merrifield,  a 
farmer,  and  Louisa  (Williams)  Merrifield.  Ancestors  of 
his  father,  who  was  the  son  of  Ichabod  and  Elizabeth 
(Morse)  Merrifield,  came  to  this  country  from  England 
between  1635  and  1650.  His  mother's  parents  were  Wil- 
liam Hastings  and  Abigail  (Robinson)  WiUiams. 

His  preparation  for  Yale,  begun  at  Powers  Institute, 
Bernardston,  Mass.,  was  completed  in  1872  at  Wesleyan 
Academy,  Wilbraham,  Mass.,  and  after  teaching  for  a  year 
at  Colfax,  Ind.,  he  entered  Yale  In  1873  ^s  a  Freshman. 
Although  dependent  largely  on  his  own  resources  through- 
out his  college  course,  he  maintained  a  high  rank  in  scholar- 
ship, receiving  several  prizes  in  English  composition, 
Oration  appointments,  and  an  election  to  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 
In  Senior  year,  he  was  on  the  editorial  board  of  the  Record, 
and  he  was  a  member  of  the  Class  Picture  and  Class  Ivy 
committees. 


98  YALE   COLLEGE 

After  teaching  for  two  years  following  his  graduation  at 
Siglar's  Preparatory  School,  Newburgh,  N.  Y.,  he  returned 
to  Yale  as  a  tutor,  remaining  until  1883.  In  1879,  he  had 
read  law  for  a  few  months  at  Grand  Forks,  N.  Dak.,  serv- 
ing also  for  a  brief  period  as  justice  of  the  peace  and 
postmaster,  and  the  year  of  1883-84  was  spent  in  farming 
near  Jamestown,  N.  Dak.  In  1884,  he  accepted  the  profes- 
sorship of  Latin  and  Greek  at  the  University  of  North 
Dakota  at  Grand  Forks,  where  for  a  while  he  also  served 
as  secretary  of  the  Faculty,  and  librarian.  Seven  years 
later,  he  was  made  professor  of  political  and  social  science, 
at  the  same  time  being  elected  president  of  the  University. 
During  his  administration  of  eighteen  years,  the  number  of 
students  at  the  University  increased  from  seventy-nine  to 
upwards  of  one  thousand,  and  seven  separate  departments 
for  professional  and  other  studies  were  established.  He 
became  a  recognized  leader  in  educational  circles  in  the 
West,  and  was  an  influential  member  of  the  National  Asso- 
ciation of  State  University  Presidents. 

In  1909,  chiefly  on  account  of  his  health,  he  resigned  as 
president  of  the  University,  and  since  that  time  had  made 
his  home  on  San  Rafael  Heights  in  Pasadena,  Gal.,  where 
he  died  suddenly,  January  22,  1916,  as  the  result  of  angina 
pectoris,  from  which  he  had  suffered  for  some  time.  He 
was  buried  in  Mountain  View  Gemetery,  Pasadena. 

During  his  residence  in  Galifornia,  Dr.  Merrifield  was 
very  active  in  philanthropic  and  educational  work,  being  a 
director  of  the  Pasadena  Young  Men's  Ghristian  Associa- 
tion and  first  vice  president  of  the  Galifornia  State  Young 
Men's  Ghristian  Association,  a  director  of  the  Pasadena 
Public  Health  League,  and  a  trustee  of  Occidental  GoUege 
in  Los  Angeles.  He  was  a  member  of  the  American  Eco- 
nomic Association  and  the  American  Academy  of  Political 
Science.  He  had  delivered  many  addresses  on  educational, 
economic,  sociological,  and  other  subjects,  and  had  written 
extensively  for  the  press  and  periodicals.  In  1892,  Yale 
conferred  the  honorary  degree  of  Master  of  Arts  upon  him, 
and  in  1909  he  received  the  degree  of  LL.D.  from  the  Uni- 
versity of  North  Dakota.  At  his  Twenty-five  Year  Reun- 
ion, he  spoke  for  the  Glass  of  1877  at  the  general  meeting 
of  alumni.  He  had  traveled  much  abroad,  and,  in  recent 
years,  was  in  the  habit  of  spending  several  weeks  annually 
at  Bad-Neuheim,  Germany. 


1 877-1 878  99 

Dr.  Merrifield  was  married  in  Newburgh,  N.  Y.,  on  June 
26,  1902,  to  Mrs.  Elizabeth  McBride  Bull,  who  survives 
him.  He  leaves  also  two  step-daughters,  Clara  Bull  (B.A. 
Vassar  1912)  and  Mrs.  Thomas  Donald  Campbell  (Eliza- 
beth Bull),  and  a  step-son,  Daniel  F.  Bull  (M.E.  Univer- 
sity of  North  Dakota  1906).  A  nephew,  Samuel  A. 
Merrifield,  is  a  non-graduate  member  of  the  College  Class 
of  1914. 


Edwin  Austin  Benton,  B.A.  1878 

Born  January  2,  1857,  in  Bhamdum,  Mount  Lebanon,  Syria 
Died  July  6,  191 5,  in  Anoka,  Minn. 

Edwin  Austin  Benton  was  born  at  Bhamdum,  Mount 
Lebanon,  Syria,  January  2,  1857,  the  son  of  Rev.  William 
Austin  Benton,  who  studied  at  Williams  College  for  two 
years,  entering  Yale  as  a  Junior  in  1841.  After  taking  his 
degree  in  1843,  he  served  for  a  long  time  in  Syria  as  a 
missionary  under  the  American  Board  of  Commissioners 
for  Foreign  Missions.  His  parents  were  Azariah  and 
Presenda  (Ladd)  Benton,  and  he  was  descended  from 
Andrew  Benton,  who  came  to  this  country  from  England 
in  1639.  The  maiden  name  of  his  wife  was  Loanza  Gould- 
ing;  she  was  the  daughter  of  Joel  and  Anna  (Howe) 
Goulding. 

His  family  coming  to  this  country  from  Syria  in  1869, 
Edwin  Benton  lived  until  he  was  sixteen  years  of  age  at 
Tolland,  Conn.,  and  was  prepared  for  college  at  Monson 
Academy.     At  Yale,  he  belonged  to  Linonia. 

During  part  of  the  year  after  taking  his  degree,  he  was 
at  the  Harvard  Divinity  School,  and  he  later  studied  the- 
ology at  Union  Theological  Seminary.  Not  long  after 
leaving  the  Seminary,  a  mental  disorder  developed,  probably 
as  a  result  of  a  fall  from  a  horse  in  his  childhood,  and  he 
had  passed  the  remainder  of  his  life  in  sanitariums.  For 
more  than  thirty  years  he  had  been  an  inmate  of  the  Anoka 
State  Asylum  at  Anoka,  Minn.,  where  he  died  July  6,  1915- 
Burial  was  in  the  Anoka  Cemetery. 

Mr.  Benton  was  not  married.  He  is  survived  by  two 
sisters,  one  of  whom,  Mary  Lathrop  Benton,  is  dean  of 
women  at  Carleton  College.    His  brothers,  Charles  William 


lOO  YALE    COLLEGE 

and  George  Henry  Benton,  graduates  of  the  College  in 
1874  and  1875,  respectively,  are  both  deceased.  In  1897, 
the  elder  received  the  honorary  degree  of  M.A.  from  Yale 
and  that  of  Litt.D.  from  the  University  of  Pittsburgh. 


James  Briggs  McEwan,  B.A.  1878 

Born  February  7,  1855,  in  Albany,  N.  Y. 
Died  December  27,  1915,  in  Albany,  N.  Y. 

James  Briggs  McEwan  was  the  son  of  John  McEwan, 
and  was  born  February  7,  1855,  in  Albany,  N.  Y.  His 
mother  was  Agnes  Gordon,  daughter  of  James  and  Janet 
(Stevens)  Lauder.  He  received  his  early  education  in 
Albany,  and,  after  spending  two  years  as  a  bookkeeper  for 
his  brother,  William,  graduated  from  the  local  high  school. 
Entering  Yale  in  1874,  he  received  Dispute  appointments 
in  Junior  and  Senior  years,  was  a  member  of  the  Senior 
Class  Supper  Committee,  and  took  second  place  in  the 
Senior  race  in  the  spring  games. 

Immediately  after  graduation,  he  entered  business  with 
his  brother  in  Albany  as  a  member  of  the  firm  of  the  Wil- 
liam McEwan  Coal  Company.  He  was  a  Republican,  and 
since  1897  had  taken  an  active  part  in  politics.  From  1897 
until  1902,  he  was  a  member  of  the  State  Assembly,  and 
for  the  next  four  years  served  as  a  state  senator.  He 
devoted  his  attention  to  private  aifairs  from  1906  to  1908, 
but,  being  appointed  postmaster  of  Albany  by  President 
Roosevelt  in  the  latter  year,  served  in  that  capacity  until 
his  nomination  for  mayor  in  the  fall  of  1909.  He  was 
elected,  and  during  his  two  terms  as  mayor  directed  the 
start  of  the  river  front  development  and  many  other 
important  public  works. 

Failing  health  necessitated  his  retirement  to  private  life 
at  the  expiration  of  his  second  term,  and  since  then  he  had 
been  confined  to  his  home,  where  he  died  December  27, 
1915.    He  was  buried  in  the  Rural  Cemetery,  Albany. 

Mr.  McEwan  was  at  the  head  of  several  Masonic  bodies, 
and  had  served  as  president  of  the  Albany  County  and  City 
Republican  clubs.  In  1905,  he  spent  six  months  in  Hart- 
ford, Conn.,  devoting  his  time  to  the  study  of  medicine. 


^  1878  lOI 

He  was  married  April  21,  1898,  in  Albany  to  Emma 
Smith,  daughter  of  Charles  and  Anna  L.  (Borst)  McClure. 
She  died  on  June  12,  1901,  and  on  December  6,  1902,  his 
marriage  took  place  in  Albany  to  her  sister,  Mrs.  Jennie 
(McClure)  Manning,  widow  of  Nathaniel  Manning,  who 
survives  him. 


Charles  Herbert  Shaw,  B.A.  1878 

Born  November  28,  1855,  in  Portland,  Maine 
Died  August  16,  1915,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 

Charles  Herbert  Shaw  was  born  in  Portland,  Maine, 
November  28,  1855,  ^^^  son  of  Joseph  Sargent  Shaw,  who 
was  later  engaged  as  a  merchant  in  New  York  City.  His 
mother  was  Margaret  Ann,  daughter  of  John  and  Jane 
(Ewing)  Sloan.  His  father's  parents  were  Rev.  Sargent 
Shaw,  whose  ancestors  came  to  this  country  from  England 
about  1634,  settling  in  Cambridge,  Mass.,  and  Susanna 
(Swett)  Shaw.  Before  coming  to  Yale,  he  studied  at  the 
Mount  Washington  Collegiate  Institute  in  New  York  City, 
at  the  College  of  the  City  of  New  York,  and  under  a  private 
tutor.  In  college  he  was  a  member  of  Linonia,  and  con- 
tributed several  articles  to  the  Yale  Literary  Magazine. 

As  the  W.  W.  DeForest  Scholar,  he  spent  the  year  fol- 
lowing his  graduation  in  post-graduate  work  at  Yale.  He 
went  abroad  in  1880,  and  studied  during  the  next  three 
years  at  the  Universities  of  Berlin  and  Heidelberg.  Upon 
his  return  to  the  United  States,  he  entered  the  Columbia 
Law  School,  where  he  received  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of 
Laws  in  1885.  He  then  began  practice  in  New  York  City, 
being  associated  with  Frank  Cunningham  (B.A.  1883, 
LL.B.  Columbia  1885)  until  1909,  when  he  entered  the  law 
division  of  the  Customs  House,  remaining  there  for  five 
years. 

In  September,  1914,  he  suffered  a  stroke  of  paralysis,  and 
his  health  was  very  poor  up  to  the  time  of  his  death,  which 
occurred  August  16,  191 5,  in  New  Haven,  Conn.,  where 
he  had  come  a  few  weeks  before  with  the  intention  of 
undertaking  work  at  the  University  Library.  His  body  was 
taken  to  New  York  for  burial  in  Woodlawn  Cemetery.    Mr. 


I02  YALE    COLLEGE 

Shaw  made  a  bequest  of  five  thousand  dollars  to  Yale  in 
his  will. 

He  had  traveled  extensively,  both  in  this  country  and 
abroad,  and  belonged  to  the  Association  of  the  Bar  of  the 
City  of  New  York  and  the  New  York  Zoological  Society. 
He  was  much  interested  in  the  work  of  the  Boys'  Club,  and 
had  served  as  a  director  in  several  manufacturing  com- 
panies. He  assisted  in  editing  the  Decennial  Record  of  the 
Class  of  1878.     He  had  never  married. 


Edwin  Cooper  Haynie,  B.A.   1879 

Born  June  27,   1856,  in   Salem,  111. 
Died  March  16,  IQ16,  in  St.  Paul,  Minn. 

Edwin  Cooper  Haynie  was  born  June  27,  1856,  in  Salem, 
111.  His  father,  Isham  Nicholas  Haynie,  was  the  son  of 
William  and  Elizabeth  (Bailey)  Haynie.  A  graduate  of 
the  University  of  Louisville,  he  served  as  a  lieutenant  in 
the  Mexican  War  and  as  colonel  of  the  Forty-eighth  Illinois 
Infantry  in  the  Civil  War,  at  the  close  of  which  he  ranked 
as  a  brigadier  general ;  for  several  years,  he  held  office  as 
judge  of  the  District  Court  for  southern  Illinois,  was  adju- 
tant general  of  Illinois  from  1865  to  1868,  and  was  also  at 
one  time  a  state  senator.  His  people  came  to  Salem,  111., 
from  Norfolk,  Va.  Edwin  Haynie's  mother  was  Elizabeth 
Ann,  daughter  of  Thomas  and  Josephine  (Fils)  Cooper. 
She  was  of  English  descent,  her  earliest  American  ancestors 
having  settled  in  Fairfield,  111. 

He  entered  Yale  from  Phillips  (Andover)  Academy,  and 
in  college  belonged  to  Linonia,  and  served  on  the  Class  Ivy 
Committee. 

He  was  graduated  from  the  Yale  School  of  Law  in  1881, 
and  after  spending  the  next  year  in  practice  in  Springfield, 
111.,  removed  to  St.  Paul,  Minn.,  which  had  since  been  his 
home.  From  1883  to  1893,  he  was  engaged  as  a  wholesale 
dealer  in  fur,  being  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Matheny, 
Haynie  &  Company.  In  the  latter  year,  he  entered  the 
casualty  insurance  business,  and  continued  in  that  line  until 
illness  compelled  his  retirement  in  1914,  having  been  for 
a  long  time  general  agent  for  Minnesota  of  the  Travelers 
Insurance  Company  of  Hartford,  Conn.,  the  Union  Casualty 


187&-1880  T03 

Company  of  St.  Louis,  and  the  Metropolitan  Casualty 
Insurance  Company  of  New  York.  He  was  also  a  director 
of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Springfield,  111.,  and  was  a 
member  of  the  Church  of  the  Messiah  (Protestant  Episco- 
pal) of  St.  Paul. 

Mr.  Haynie's  death  occurred  at  his  home  in  that  city, 
March  16,  1916,  after  a  lingering  illness  due  to  Bright's 
disease.  Burial  was  in  Oakridge  Cemetery  at  Springfield, 
where  he  lived  during  his  boyhood. 

He  was  married  in  New  Haven,  Conn.,  September  14, 
1881,  to  Minnie  Pierpont,  daughter  of  Lucius  Willoughby 
and  Elizabeth  (Shepard)  Hall,  who  survives  him  with 
their  four  children:  Ethel  Corinth  (Mrs.  Arthur  Hobart 
Warner  of  Denver,  Colo.)  ;  Donald  Parker,  a  graduate  of 
the  College  in  1906;  Elizabeth  Mercedes,  who  married  Mr. 
Frederic  Harry  of  Denver,  and  Marguerite  Pierpont. 


Edwin  Carrington  Ward,  B.A.   1880 

Born  January  9,  1858,  in  Farmington,  Conn. 
Died  July  28,  1915,  in  Bay  Shore,  N.  Y. 

Edwin  Carrington  Ward  was  born  in  Farmington,  Conn., 
January  9,  1858,  the  son  of  Augustus  Ward,  a  merchant 
and  farmer,  and  Susan  (Cowles)  Ward.  On  the  paternal 
side,  he  was  descended  from  Andrew  Ward,  who  came 
about  1635  from  England  to  Fairfield,  Conn.,  as  Lord  High 
Commissioner,  and  who  was  one  of  the  founders  of  Stam- 
ford and  Wethersfield,  Conn.  Other  ancestors  of  his 
father  were  the  Shepards,  a  Connecticut  family  prominent 
in  the  eighteenth  century;  Amos  Shepard,  his  great-grand- 
father, was  in  one  of  the  companies  that  participated  in  the 
siege  of  Yorktown.  His  mother,  who  was  the  daughter 
of  Seth  and  Susan  (Whitman)  Cowles,  was  a  descendant 
of  Elijah  Cowles  (B.A.  1826)  whose  ancestors  settled  in 
Farmington  in  1638,  and  of  John  Whitman,  who  settled 
in  Weymouth,  Mass.,  sometime  prior  to  1638,  and  of  Wil- 
liam Whitman,  who  is  credited  with  having  saved  Oregon, 
Washington,  and  the  Northwest  Territory  to  the  United 
States,  and  after  whom  Whitman  College  was  named. 

He  received  his  preparatory  training  at  the  Hartford 
(Conn.)  Public  High  School,  and  in  college  was  given  Dis- 


I04  YALE   COLLEGE 

pute  appointments.  After  taking  his  B.A.  in  1880,  he 
entered  the  Yale  School  of  Law,  from  which  he  was 
graduated  in  1882. 

Since  the  fall  of  that  year,  he  had  practiced  law  in  New 
York  City  and  Brooklyn,  making  his  home  in  Brooklyn. 
He  was  for  a  time  associated  with  his  older  brother  and 
later  with  his  classmate,  John  A.  Amundson,  but  since  1891 
he  had  practiced  alone.  In  1882  and  1883,  Mr.  Ward  pur- 
sued special  courses  in  law  at  Columbia.  He  published 
"A  Book  of  1,500  Legal  Questions"  in  1885,  and  two 
years  later,  in  conjunction  with  Robert  W.  Bonynge  (B.A. 
College  of  the  City  of  New  York  1882,  LL.B.  Columbia 
1885),  he  wrote  "1,500  Questions  Answered." 

He  belonged  to  the  First  Presbyterian  Chu'-ch  of  Brook- 
lyn, and  always  took  an  active  part  in  all  movements  for 
the  welfare  of  the  community  in  which  he  lived.  For 
several  years,  he  served  as  secretary  of  the  board  of  direc- 
tors of  the  old  Brooklyn  Academy  of  Music,  and  was  after- 
wards, until  his  death,  secretary  of  the  new  Academy.  He 
was  a  member  of  the  Sons  of  the  Revolution. 

Mr.  Ward's  death  occurred  July  28,  191 5,  at  his  summer 
home  at  Bay  Shore,  Long  Island,  of  arterio  sclerosis,  after 
an  illness  of  a  year.  He  was  buried  in  Greenwood  Cemetery 
in  Brooklyn. 

On  December  23,  1895,  he  was  married  in  Brooklyn  to 
Marion  Louette,  daughter  of  Rev.  Lewis  Emmons  Matson 
(B.  A.  1857)  and  Helen  Maria  (Flanders)  Matson.  She 
survives  him  with  their  four  children:  Helen,  Kenneth, 
Winifred,  and  Frederic  Augustus.  His  sons  are  preparing 
for  Yale.  Mr.  Ward  was  a  brother  of  Frederic  Aus'ustus 
Ward  (B.A.  1862,  LL.B.  Columbia  1864)  and  of  Hubert 
Cowles  Ward,  a  graduate  of  the  Scientific  School  in  1862. 


John  Clarke  Smith,  B.A.   1881 

Born  August  4,  1858,  in  Waterbury,  Conn. 
Died  July  31,  1915,  in  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 

John  Clarke  Smith  was  born  in  Waterbury,  Conn., 
August  4,  1858,  the  son  of  John  Edward  and  Lucy  Ann 
(Clarke)  Smith  and  a  descendant  of  John  Smith,  who  came 
from  England  in  1640  and  settled  in  Milford,  Conn.     His 


I 


I880-I88I  105 

father  was  president  and  a  director  of  the  Smith  &  Griggs 
Manufacturing  Company  of  Waterbury,  and  served  also 
as  a  director  in  several  other  manufacturing  concerns. 
The  son  entered  Yale  in  1877  from  the  Hopkins  Grammar 
School  in  New  Haven,  and  took  his  degree  with  the  Class. 

From  graduation,  Mr.  Smith  had  been  connected  with  the 
Waterbury  Button  Company,  at  first  in  Waterbury,  but 
since  1883  in  New  York  City,  where  he  held  the  position 
of  manager  of  the  company's  store.  He  was  unmarried, 
and  made  his  home  in  Brooklyn.  In  1883,  he  spent  several 
months  abroad. 

His  death  occurred  in  the  Long  Island  College  Hospital, 
Brooklyn,  July  31,  191 5,  being  due  to  typhoid  fever.  He 
was  buried  in  River  Side  Cemetery,  Waterbury. 

His  brother,  Ralph  Hebert,  graduated  from  the  Sheffield 
Scientific  School  in  1888,  and  his  only  sister  married  Carl 
E.  Munger  (Ph.B.  1880,  M.D.  Columbia  1883). 


George  Martin  Wallace,  B.A.   1881 

Born  April  11,  1855,  in  North  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  June  19,  1916,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 

George  Martin  Wallace  was  born  in  North  Haven,  Conn., 
April  II,  1855,  the  son  of  Robert  Wallace,  a  manufacturer 
and  inventor  of  Wallingford,  Conn.,  where  he  estabHshed 
the  firm  of  R.  Wallace  &  Sons  Company.  He  was  the 
grandson  of  James  and  Urania  (Williams)  Wallace  and 
the  great-grandson  of  James  Wallace,  who  came  from  Scot- 
land in  1730  and  settled  at  Blandford,  Mass.  In  that  town, 
the  latter  set  up  the  first  silk  loom  brought  to  this  country; 
a  valuable  collection  of  books  which  he  also  brought  to 
America  with  him  was  divided  at  his  death  among  several 
towns  in  Massachusetts.  The  mother  of  George  Wallace 
was  Harriet  Louisa  (Moulthrop)  Wallace.  She  was  also  of 
an  old  North  Haven  family,  her  parents  being  Martin  and 
Unice  (Jacobs)  Moulthrop. 

Before  entering  Yale  in  1877,  he  studied  in  the  public 
schools  of  Wallingford,  at  Hopkins  Grammar  School  in 
New  Haven,  and  at  the  Hudson  River  Institute  at  Clave- 
rack,  N.  Y.  His  scholarship  appointments  in  college  were 
Orations. 


Io6  YALE    COLLEGE 

In  the  fall  of  1882,  after  a  year  of  foreign  travel  and 
study,  he  began  his  preparation  for  a  legal  career  in  the 
Yale  School  of  Law.  He  received  the  degree  of  LL.B.  in 
1884,  and  for  the  next  six  years  practiced  in  New  Haven 
and  Wallingford.  During  this  period,  he  was  a  member 
of  the  Connecticut  Legislature,  and  prosecuting  attorney 
for  the  borough  of  Wallingford.  In  January,  1891,  he 
temporarily  gave  up  practice,  and  went  to  Chicago,  111.,  as 
manager  for  the  R.  Wallace  &  Sons  Manufacturing  Com- 
pany, continuing  in  that  position  for  four  years.  He 
returned  to  New  Haven  in  1896,  and  had  since  followed 
his  profession  as  a  lawyer  in  that  city.  He  frequently  wrote 
articles  on  political  subjects  for  newspapers  and  periodicals, 
and,  in  1906,  was  a  candidate  for  Congress  on  the  Demo- 
cratic ticket,  but  was  defeated.  He  was  a  Congrega- 
tionalist,  being  a  member  of  Center  Church,  New  Haven, 
and  belonged  to  the  New  Haven  Chamber  of  Commerce, 
the  Connecticut  Academy  of  Arts  and  Sciences,  and  the 
American  Economic  Society.  He  had  traveled  extensively 
in  this  country  and  in  Europe,  Mexico,  Central  America, 
and  Canada. 

Mr.  Wallace  died,  by  his  own  hand,  at  his  home  in  New 
Haven,  June  19,  1916.  Burial  was  in  In  Memoriam  Ceme- 
tery in  Wallingford. 

His  marriage  took  place  December  27,  1882,  in  Flushing, 
N.  Y.,  to  Annie  Jane,  daughter  of  John  and  Margaret  Lee, 
who  survives  him  with  four  children:  Margaret  Lee,  who 
studied  in  the  Yale  School  of  Music  during  1906-07;  Katha- 
rine Lee;  Malcolm  Lee,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1915, 
and  Donald  Lee.  Another  son,  Robert  Lee,  died  in  infancy. 
Mr.  Wallace  was  the  uncle  of  Charles  D.  and  Robert  W. 
Morris,  both  members  of  the  College  Class  of  1892;  of 
Clifford  W.  and  John  W.  Leavenworth,  graduates  of  the 
Scientific  School  in  1891  and  1905,  respectively,  and  of 
Robert  and  Floyd  Wallace,  the  former  of  whom  received 
the  degree  of  Ph.B.  at  Yale  in  1907  and  the  latter  that  of 
B.A,  in  1909. 


■ 
I 


I88I-I882  107 


Carlton  Alexander  Foote,  B.A.  1882 

Born  January  lo,  1859,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  June  9,  1916,  in  New  York  City 

Carlton  Alexander  Foote  was  born  in  New  Haven,  Conn., 
January  10,  1859,  the  son  of  Alexander  Foote,  a  merchant, 
whose  parents  were  Warham  Williams  and  Lucinda  (Harri- 
son) Foote,  and  a  descendant  of  Nathaniel  Foote,  who 
married  Elizabeth  Deming  in  England  about  161 5  and 
became  one  of  the  first  settlers  of  Wethersfield,  Conn.  His 
mother  was  Sarah  Amelia,  daughter  of  Stephen  and  Cather- 
ine (Wright)  Kelsey.  She  was  descended  from  Benjamin 
Wright,  who  came  from  England  to  Madison,  Conn.,  in 
1660.  Another  ancestor  on  the  paternal  side  was  Rev.  War- 
ham  Williams  (B.A.  1745),  who  served  as  a  Fellow  of 
Yale  from  1769  until  1788  and  as  secretary  of  the  Cor- 
poration from  1770  to  1776. 

He  received  his  preparatory  training  in  New  Haven,  in 
the  high  school  and  under  a  private  tutor.  In  Freshman 
year  at  Yale,  he  was  awarded  a  Berkeley  premium  of  the 
first  grade  in  Latin  composition.  His  scholarship  appoint- 
ments were  Dissertations. 

Mr.  Foote  taught  at  the  Bishop  Scott  Grammar  School 
in  Portland,  Ore.,  from  1882  to  1884,  and  then  returned 
to  Yale  for  two  years  of  post-graduate  study  as  the  Earned 
Scholar.  In  1887,  he  went  to  Atchison,  Kans.,  to  take 
charge  of  the  Atchison  Latin  School.  He  continued  there 
until  June,-  1896,  and  then  taught  for  two  years  at  the 
Irving  School  in  New  York  City.  He  was  afterwards 
engaged  in  private  tutoring  for  several  years,  but  since 
1902,  had  been  an  instructor  in  Latin  at  the  DeWitt  Clinton 
High  School  in  New  York  City.  The  degree  of  M.A.  in 
course  was  given  to  him  by  Yale  in  1902. 

His  death  occurred  suddenly  June  9,  1916,  at  his  resi- 
dence in  New  York,  as  the  result  of  heart  disease.  Burial 
was  in  Evergreen  Cemetery,  New  Haven. 

Mr.  Foote  was  unmarried.  Surviving  him  are  a  sister 
and  a  brother. 


o8  YALE   COLLEGE 


Charles  Burnell  Hawkes,  B.A.  1882 

Born  April  24,  1859,  in  Portland,  Maine 
Died  March  13,  1916,  in  New  York  City 

Charles  Burnell  Hawkes,  who  was  born  April  24,  1859, 
in  Portland,  Maine,  was  the  son  of  Charles  Morrell  Hawkes. 
Adams  Hawkes,  the  founder  of  the  family  in  this  country, 
was  an  English  Quaker,  who  first  settled  in  Saugus,  Mass., 
in  1630.  The  mother  of  Charles  B.  Hawkes  was  Susan 
Annette,  daughter  of  William  Whitney  and  granddaughter 
of  Sir  Thomas  Whitehead,  of  Wellington's  staff  at  Water- 
loo. She  was  of  Puritan  ancestry,  being  a  descendant  of 
John  and  Eleanor  Whitney,  who  came  to  Watertown, 
Mass.,  in  June,  1635. 

He  received  his  preparatory  training  at  the  Portland 
High  School  and  at  Hopkins  Grammar  School,  New  Haven, 
and  before  joining  the  Class  of  1882  as  a  Junior,  spent 
some  time  with  the  Class  of  1881. 

Mr.  Hawkes  was  graduated  from  the  Yale  School  of 
Law  the  year  after  receiving  his  BA.  From  1883  to  1886, 
he  was  engaged  in  practice  at  Topeka,  Kans.,  but  in  the 
latter  year  returned  to  New  Haven,  where  he  followed  his 
profession  for  three  years.  He  opened  an  office  in  New 
York  City  in  1889,  and  spent  the  rest  of  his  life  in  practice 
there.  In  1887,  after  a  year  of  graduate  work,  he  was 
granted  the  degree  of  M.L.  at  Yale. 

Mr.  Hawkes  had  suffered  from  a  nervous  disorder  for 
some  time,  as  a  result  of  which  he  lost  his  life  at  his  home 
in  New  York  City  on  March  13,  1916.  Interment  was  in 
Evergreen  Cemetery,  New  Haven. 

He  was  married  in  New  York  City,  January  21,  1890,  to 
Julia  A.  Burrell,  who  survives  him  without  children.  He 
was  a  brother  of  William  Whitney  Hawkes,  a  graduate  of 
the  College  in  1879  and  of  the  School  of  Medicine  in  1881, 
Samuel  Newhall  Hawkes  (B.A.  1883,  LL.B.  1885),  and  of 
the  late  George  Pickard  Hawkes,  who  received  the  degrees 
of  B.A.  and  LL.B.  at  Yale  in  1891  and  1894,  respectively. 
A  sister,  Susanna  Whitney  Hawkes  (B.A.  Wellesley  1887), 
also  survives. 


1882-1883  I09 


Charles  Rogers  Cor  with,  B.A.  1883 

Born  February  13,  i860,  in  Galena,  111. 
Died  December  8,  191 5,  in  Chicago,  111. 

Charles  Rogers  Corwith,  son  of  Henry  Corwith,  a  pioneer 
in  the  lead  industry  in  Galena,  111.,  and  Isabelle  (Soulard) 
Corwith,  was  born  in  Galena,  February  13,  i860.  He  pre- 
pared for  Yale  at  Phillips  Academy,  Andover,  Mass.,  and 
in  college  played  on  the  Freshman  Football  Team,  took  part 
in  track  athletics,  served  as  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the 
Athletic  Association  in  Junior  year,  and  received  a  Collo- 
quy appointment  at  Commencement. 

Since  graduation,  he  had  been  in  the  real  estate  and  loan 
business  in  Chicago,  111.,  and  after  his  father's  death  in 
1888,  managed  his  estate.  He  was  an  associate  member  of 
the  Chicago  Real  Estate  Board  and  the  Stock  Exchange. 
He  belonged  to  the  First  Presbyterian  Church  of  Chicago, 
and  had  served  since  1896  as  a  trustee  of  the  Chicago 
Orphan  Asylum. 

Mr.  Corwith's  death,  which  was  due  to  hemorrhage  of 
the  brain,  occurred,  after  a  brief  illness,  at  his  home  in 
Chicago,  December  8,  191 5.  He  was  buried  in  Greenwood 
Cemetery  in  his  native  town.  He  had  never  married.  Sur- 
viving him  are  his  mother,  three  sisters,  and  a  brother. 
The  latter,  John  White  Corwith,  graduated  from  Yale  with 
the  degree  of  B.A.  in  1890. 


Charles  William  Harkness,  B.A.   1883 

Born  December  17,  i860,  in  Monroeville,  Ohio 
Died  May  i,  1916,  in  New  York  City- 
Charles  William  Harkness  was  born  in  Monroeville,  Ohio, 
December  17,  i860,  the  son  of  Stephen  Vanderburg  and 
Anna  M.  (Richardson)  Harkness.  His  father,  a  descend- 
ant of  William  Harkness,  who  came  to  America  from  Scot- 
land in  1710,  was  the  son  of  David  and  Martha  (Cook) 
Harkness.  His  maternal  grandparents  were  James  and 
Anna  M.   (Rauck)  Richardson. 

Charles   Harkness   received   his   preparation   for   college 
at  the  Brooks  School  at  Cleveland,  and  first  entered  Yale 


110  YALE  COLLEGE 

in  1878.  He  joined  the  Class  with  which  he  was  gradu- 
ated in  its  Freshman  year. 

For  two  and  a  half  years  after  taking  his  degree,  he 
studied  in  the  Columbia  Law  School.  He  lived  in  Cleve- 
land for  the  next  three  years,  but  since  1891  his  home  had 
been  in  New  York.  In  addition  to  the  management  of 
the  Harkness  estate,  with  which  he  had  been  occupied  since 
the  death  of  his  father,  who  was  associated  with  the  Stand- 
ard Oil  Company  from  its  early  inception,  he  was  a  direc- 
tor in  the  Southern  Pacific  Company,  the  Chicago, 
Milwaukee  &  St.  Paul  Railway,  the  Baltimore  &  Ohio 
Railroad,  and  the  Tilden  Iron  Mining  Company.  He  took 
an  active  interest  in  St.  Bartholomew's  Clinic  of  New 
York.  Mr.  Harkness  usually  spent  the  summer  near  Madi- 
son, N.  J.,  where  he  had  a  large  country  estate.  He  had 
been  greatly  interested  in  yachting  for  a  number  of  years, 
and  was  the  owner  of  the  ocean-going  steam  yacht,  Agawa. 

Mr.  Harkness  had  been  seriously  ill  since  the  fall  of 
I9I5>  when  he  suffered  an  attack  of  auto-intoxication,  fol- 
lowed by  the  grippe.  After  spending  part  of  the  winter 
at  St.  Augustine,  Fla.,  he  returned  to  his  home  in  New 
York  City,  where  he  died  May  i,  1916.  Burial  was  in 
Woodlawn  Cemetery  in  New  York.  The  sum  of  $500,000 
is  left  to  the  University  by  the  will  of  Mr.  Harkness. 

He  was  married  May  27,  1896,  in  Philadelphia,  Pa.,'  to 
Mary,  daughter  of  WilHam  Grey  and  Sarah  Wells  (Bush- 
nell)  Warden  and  sister  of  Clarence  Arthur  Warden 
(Ph.B.  1899,  LL.B.  University  of  Pennsylvania  1902). 
She  survives  him  without  children.  His  mother  and  a 
brother,  Edward  Stephen  Harkness  (B.A.  1897),  are  also 
living.  He  was  a  cousin  of  William  L.  Harkness,  a  grad- 
uate of  the  College  in  1881. 


Jonathan  Barnes,  B.A.  1885 

Born  July  31,  1864,  in  Darien,  Conn. 
Died  March  4,  1916,  in  Springfield,  Mass. 

Jonathan  Barnes,  son  of  Jonathan  Ebenezer  and  Emily 
Hart  (Wells)  Barnes,  was  born  July  31,  1864,  in  Darien, 
Conn.,  where  his  father,  who  died  two  years  later,  was  at 
the  time  serving  as  pastor  of  the  Congregational  Church. 


I883-I885  III 

Mr.  Barnes  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  at  Wesleyan  in 
1848,  and  studied  theology  at  Yale  from  1850  to  1853. 

Jonathan  Barnes  entered  college  from  the  high  school  in 
Springfield,  Mass.,  where  he  passed  his  boyhood.  In  his 
Freshman  year  at  Yale,  he  was  awarded  a  Berkeley  pre- 
mium of  the  first  grade,  and  as  a  Senior  was  given  the  Scott 
prize  in  German.  He  was  elected  to  Phi  Beta  Kappa, 
received  Philosophical  Oration  appointments,  and  ranked 
fifth  in  his  Class  at  graduation.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
Class  Day  Committee. 

After  taking  his  degree,  he  returned  to  Springfield,  and 
began  the  study  of  law  in  the  office  of  his  uncle,  Gideon 
Wells  (B.A.  1858).  He  was  admitted  to  the  bar  of  Hamp- 
den County  in  March,  1888,  and  entered  the  Yale  School  of 
Law  the  next  fall,  but  left  three  months  later  to  accept  a 
partnership  with  his  uncle  and  William  Wallace  McClench 
(B.A.  Tufts  1875).  That  connection  was  continued  until 
1893,  since  which  time  Mr.  Barnes  had  practiced  independ- 
ently. He  was  ranked  among  the  leading  attorneys  of 
Springfield,  and  was  especially  in  demand  as  an  auditor 
and  special  master  in  difficult  cases.  He  was  trustee  of 
several  large  estates,  and  at  one  time  was  attorney  for  the 
Springfield  Street  Railway  Company.  He  had  served  as 
a  director  of  the  Springfield  Board  of  Trade  and  of  the 
Y.  M.  C.  A. ;  was  at  one  time  president  of  the  Yale  Alumni 
Association  of  Central  and  Western  Massachusetts  and  its 
representative  on  the  Alumni  Advisory  Board,  and,  since 
1889,  had  been  clerk  of  the  South  Congregational  Church, 
in  whose  Sunday  school  work  he  had  once  taken  an  active 
part.  He  was  especially  interested  in  the  proposed  dredg- 
ing of  the  Connecticut  River  and  the  possibilities  of  the 
commercial  use  of  the  river  if  made  navigable.  For  twenty 
years,  he  had  been  president  of  the  Springfield  Canoe  Club. 
During  1895-96,  he  was  a  member  of  the  Republican  City 
Committee,  and  he  had  also  served  as  a  delegate  to  one  of 
the  state  conventions. 

Mr.  Barnes  died  in  Springfield  on  March  4,  1916, 
after  a  month's  illness  due  to  Bright's  disease.  His  body 
was  cremated.  He  made  a  bequest  of  $1,000  to  Yale  in 
his  will  to  be  reckoned  as  a  contribution  to  the  principal  of 
the  Alumni  University  Fund  from  the  Class  of  1885. 

He  had  not  married.  His  Yale  relatives  included 
Jonathan  Barnes,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in   1784,  the 


112  YALE    COLLEGE 

latter's  three  sons,  Jonathan  (B.A.  1810),  Julius  Steele 
(B.A.  1815,  M.D.  1818),  and  Josiah  (B.A.  1825,  M.D.  Uni- 
versity of  Pennsylvania  1829),  and  his  grandsons,  Lewis 
Barnes,  who  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  from  Yale  in  1847 
and  that  of  M.D.  from  the  University  of  Buffalo  in  1850, 
and  Edwin  Randolph  Barnes  (B.A.  i860,  M.D.  Long  Island 
College  Hospital  1865). 


Ernest  Howard  Hunter,  B.A.  1885 

Born  September  i,  1864,  in  London,  England 
Died  January  22,  1916,  in  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

Ernest  Howard  Hunter  was  born  in  London,  England, 
September  i,  1864,  the  son  of  Robert  and  Sarah  (Barton) 
Hunter.  His  father,  whose  parents  were  James  and  Eliza- 
beth Hunter,  studied  from  1842  to  1845  in  the  Medical 
College  of  Geneva,  N.  Y.,  and  after  taking  his  medical 
degree  from  New  York  University  in  1846,  continued  his 
work  abroad.  He  practiced  in  London  and  Chicago,  acquir- 
ing a  world-wide  reputation,  and,  as  the  result  of  exhaus- 
tive study,  formulated  the  theory  of  the  local  origin  of 
consumption.  James  Hunter,  whose  ancestry  was  derived 
from  the  Long  Calderwood  branch  of  Hunters  of  Hunters- 
ton,  to  which  also  belonged  John  and  William  Hunter,  two 
of  the  most  famous  surgeons  and  anatomists  of  their 
century,  was  an  English  Army  surgeon,  who,  subsequent  to 
his  retirement  from  service  in  1827,  removed  to  Canada, 
where  he  became  prominent  both  in  his  profession  and  in 
politics;  he  settled  in  New  York  City  after  1837.  An 
ancestor  was  Robert  Hunter,  colonial  governor  of  Virginia 
from  1707  to  1 7 10,  of  New  York  and  East  and  West  Jersey 
for  the  next  nine  years,  and  of  Jamaica  from  1727  until  his 
death  in  1734. 

Ernest  Hunter  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  the  South  Division 
and  Central  High  schools  in  Chicago,  and  received  a  Col- 
loquy appointment  in  Junior  year,  at  the  end  of  which  he 
withdrew  from  college.  The  degree  of  B.A.  as  of  the  Class 
of  1885  was  conferred  upon  him  by  the  University  in  19 10. 

His  training  for  the  law,  first  taken  up  in  Chicago  in 
1884  in  the  office  of  Mr.  Emory  A.  Storrs,  was  completed 
at  the  Law  School  of  the  University  of  Pennsylvania  in 


i885  113 

1887,  when  he  received  an  LL.B.  He  was  admitted  to  the 
bar  in  Philadelphia  in  that  year,  and  from  the  beginning 
of  his  legal  career  specialized  in  patent  cases.  During  his 
course  at  the  University  of  Pennsylvania,  he  studied  in  the 
office  of  his  brother,  Rudolph  Melville  Hunter  (M.E.  Poly- 
technic College  of  the  State  of  Pennsylvania  1878),  a 
patent  solicitor  and  expert,  and  an  inventor,  and  from  1887 
to  1913  was  associated  in  practice  with  him.  In  July,  1913, 
he  withdrew  from  this  association,  and  continued  his  prac- 
tice alone.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Law  Association  of 
Philadelphia,  and  an  Episcopalian,  being  a  communicant 
of  St.  Clement's  Church. 

Mr.  Hunter  had  suffered  from  tuberculosis  since  1908, 
but  was  able  to  attend  to  his  professional  affairs  until  within 
a  few  weeks  of  his  death,  which  occurred  January  22,  1916, 
at  his  home  in  Philadelphia.  He  was  buried  in  West  Laurel 
Hill  Cemetery  in  that  city. 

Lie  was  married  in  Phoenixville,  Pa.,  June  24,  1891,  to 
Mary  Scull,  daughter  of  Paul  Scull  and  Keturah  (Kraemer) 
Reeves.  She  survives  him  with  six  children:  Robert,  a 
graduate  of  the  College  in  191 5;  Paul  Reeves  Howard; 
Katherine  Reeves;  Alfred  Reeves;  Barton  Howard,  and 
Mary.  Three  other  children, — Ernest  Howard,  Jr. ;  Sarah, 
and  Morgan  Edwin  Orby, — died  in  infancy. 


Edward  Bunnell  Phelps,  B.A.  1885 

Born  July  26,  1863,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  July  24,  1915,  in  New  York  City 

Edward  Bunnell  Phelps  was  born  July  26,  1863,  in  New 
Haven,  Conn.,  and  was  prepared  for  Yale  at  the  Hill- 
house  High  School  in  that  city.  His  parents  were  Alfred 
William  Phelps,  a  builder,  who  represented  New  Haven 
in  the  State  Legislature  of  1867-68,  and  Mary  A.  (Bun- 
nell) Phelps.  He  was  seventh  in  descent  from  William 
Phelps,  who,  coming  from  England  in  1630,  became  promi- 
nent in  the  affairs  of  Connecticut  Colony,  being  one  of 
the  magistrates  who  in  1639  drafted  the  constitution  for 
Windsor,  Wethersfield,  and  Hartford. 

At  Yale,  he  had  been  college  reporter  for  the  Morning 
News,  and  after  taking  his  degree  he  spent  nine  years  in 


114  YALE    COLLEGE 

newspaper  work,  at  first  on  the  staff  of  the  New  Haven 
Palladium  and  then  in  New  York  City,  where  he  served 
in  various  capacities  on  several  papers.  In  1894,  he  estab- 
lished a  magazine  known  as  Thrift,  a  monthly  publication 
devoted  to  the  interests  of  insurance.  The  name  of  this 
magazine  was  in  1902  changed  to  The  American  Under- 
writer, becoming  in  1902  The  American  Underwriter 
Magazine  and  Insurance  Review.  As  the  editor  of  this 
magazine  and  the  head  of  the  Thrift  Ptiblishing  Company, 
Mr.  Phelps  became  widely  known  as  an  authority  on  insur- 
ance subjects,  and  was  often  called  upon  to  speak  before 
organizations  or  to  prepare  articles  and  reports  for  publica- 
tion in  magazines.  He  was  the  author  of  "War  Risks" 
(1898),  "A  Decade  without  a  Parallel  in  the  History  of 
American  Insurance"  (1905),  "American  Mortality  Statis- 
tics for  the  Nine  Years,  1900-1908"  (1910),  "The  Relation 
of  Women's  Work  and  Infant  Mortality"  (1910),  "The 
Mortality  of  Alcohol"  (1911),  "Workmen's  Compensa- 
tion; A  Study  of  Its  Probable  Cost  to  the  Community" 
(1912),  and  many  others.  For  a  number  of  years,  he  was 
engaged  in  compiling  a  cyclopaedia  dealing  with  the  world's 
best  clubs.  In  1909,  he  ran  for  a  short  time  the  insurance 
section  of  The  Financier  of  New  York.  During  1892-93, 
he  served  as  corresponding  secretary  of  the  New  York 
Press  Club,  and  in  1892  was  one  of  its  delegates  to  the  con- 
vention of  the  International  League  of  Press  Clubs.  In 
January,  1912,  he  was  the  delegate  of  the  American  Statis- 
tical Association  to  the  convention  of  the  National  Civic 
Federation  at  Washington.  Mr.  Phelps  belonged  to  the 
Empire  State  Society,  the  Sons  of  the  American  Revolu- 
tion, the  New  York  Genealogical  and  Biographical  Society, 
and  the  Sons  of  Colonial  Wars.  He  was  a  Fellow  of  the 
American  Statistical  Association  and  the  Royal  Statistical 
Association  of  London  and  a  member  of  the  American 
Academy  of  Political  and  Social  Science,  the  American 
Economic  Association,  the  American  Sociological  Society, 
and  the  American  Association  for  the  Study  and  Prevention 
of  Infant  Mortahty.  In  1902,  he  took  the  degree  of  M.A. 
in  course  at  Yale. 

He  died,  as  the  result  of  an  attack  of  acute  indigestion, 
July  24,  19 1 5,  at  his  home  in  New  York  City,  and  was 
buried  in  Maple  Grove  Cemetery  at  Kew  Gardens,  Long 
Island. 


i885  115 

His  marriage  took  place  in  New  York  City,  April  12, 
1897,  to  Mrs.  Blanche  Louise  Lewis  (Norton)  Dey,  daugh- 
ter of  William  Condon  and  Sarah  (Milne)  Norton  and 
widow  of  C.  W.  Dey.  She  survives  him,  as  does  a  step- 
son, Howard  Norton  Dey. 


Joseph  Hendley  Townsend,  B.A.   1885 

Born  January  18,  1862,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  January  7,  1916,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 

Joseph  Hendley  Townsend,  the  son  of  John  and  Harriet 
Esther  (Sears)  Townsend,  was  born  on  January  18,  1862, 
in  New  Haven,  Conn.,  where  members  of  his  family  have 
lived  since  1739.  His  father  was  the  son  of  James  Webster 
and  Rachel  (Mansfield)  Townsend  and  a  descendant  of 
Thomas  Townsend,  who  emigrated  from  London,  England, 
in  1637  and  settled  in  Lynn,  Mass.  His  mother  was  the 
daughter  of  Elisha  and  Esther  (Hendley)  Sears  of  Middle- 
town,  Conn. 

At  the  Hillhouse  High  School  in  New  Haven,  he  obtained 
his  preparation  for  college,  and  graduated  from  Yale  in 
1885  with  a  Colloquy  appointment.  The  following  fall,  he 
entered  the  Medical  Department  of  Yale  University,  from 
which  he  graduated  in  1887,  receiving  the  Campbell  prize 
for  the  best  examination  in  obstetrics. 

After  serving  for  a  year  and  a  half  on  the  house  staff 
of  the  New  IJaven  Hospital,  he  commenced  practice  in 
New  Haven,  where  he  continued  to  reside  until  his  death. 
He  served  on  the  staff  of  the  New  Haven  Dispensary  from 
1 89 1  to  1894,  and  was  also  connected  with  the  teaching  staff 
of  the  Medical  Department  of  the  University, — first  in  1891 
and  1892  as  assistant  in  clinical  medicine,  from  1892  to 
1894  as  demonstrator  of  obstetrics,  being  the  first  to  receive 
that  appointment,  and  from  191 1  to  1915  as  lecturer  on 
hygiene. 

After  serving  for  several  years  on  the  Board  of  Health 
of  the  city  of  New  Haven,  he  was  appointed  by  Governor 
McLean,  in  1901,  a  member  of  the  State  Board  of  Health 
of  Connecticut,  of  which  he  was  elected  secretary  and 
executive  officer  in  March,  1906,  an  office  which  he  held  at 
his  death.    He  enlisted  as  a  private  in   "The  Grays,"  Com- 


ii6 


YALE   COLLEGE 


pany  F,  Second  Connecticut  Infantry,  July  i,  1891 ;  was 
appointed  first  lieutenant,  assistant  surgeon,  September  15, 
1892;  major,  surgeon.  Second  Connecticut  Infantry,  June 
II,  1896;  and  chief  surgeon,  Sanitary  Troops,  Connecticut 
National  Guard,  March  25,  191 1.  In  token  of  respect  to 
his  memory,  the  Adjutant  General,  by  order  of  the  Gover- 
nor, ordered  that  the  national  flag  be  displayed  at  half 
mast  on  all  state  armories  until  2:00  p.  m.  on  the  day  of 
his  funeral.  Dr.  Townsend  served  for  many  years  as  a 
member  of  the  Board  of  United  States  Examining  Surgeons 
for  pensions.  He  was  a  member  of  the  New  Haven  Medi- 
cal Association,  of  which  he  was  secretary  for  four  years 
(1893-1896)  and  president  for  the  two  years  of  1897  and 
1898;  of  the  New  Haven  County  Medical  Association, 
of  which  he  was  clerk  for  nine  years,  1892-1901,  and  presi- 
dent in  1903;  of  the  Connecticut  State  Medical  Society, 
of  which,  at  his  death,  he  was  treasurer,  having  been  elected 
annually  since  1905  ;  of  the  American  Medical  Association ; 
the  American  Public  Health  Association,  and  the  Associa- 
tion of  Military  Surgeons.  He  was  also  a  member  of  the 
Sons  of  the  American  Revolution.  He  was  a  Congrega- 
tionalist,  having  been  a  member  of  United  Church  in  New 
Haven  for  many  years.  In  politics  he  was  a  loyal 
Republican. 

Dr.  Townsend  died  at  his  home  on  January  7,  1916,  of 
pneumonia,  following  influenza,  after  an  illness  of  a  week, 
and  was  buried  in  the  Grove  Street  Cemetery,  New  Haven. 

He  was  married  in  New  York  City,  April  28,  1896,  to 
Mrs.  Bertha  (Goodyear)  Bradley,  the  daughter  of  General 
Ellsworth  D.  S.  Goodyear  and  Sarah  A.  (Bishop)  Good- 
year, of  North  Haven,  Conn.  He  is  survived  by  Mrs. 
Townsend  and  a  step-daughter,  Barbara  Bradley  (B.A. 
Mt.  Holyoke  1912). 

Henry  Semple  Ames,  B.A.   1886 

Born  March  4,  186.3,  in  St.  Louis,  Mo. 
Died  January  16,  1916,  in  St.  Louis,  Mo. 

Henry  Semple  Ames  was  born  in  St.  Louis,  Mo.,  March 
4,  1863,  being  the  son  of  Edgar  Ames,  a  graduate  of  the 
University  of  Cincinnati,  and  Lucy  Virginia  (Semple) 
Ames.    His  preparation,  for  Yale,  begun  at  Smith  Academy 


1885-1886  117 

In  St.  Louis,  was  completed  by  four  years  of  study  abroad — 
in  Hanover,  Germany,  and  Paris,  France.  He  received  an 
Oration  appointment  in  Junior  year  and  a  Dissertation  at 
Commencement,  and  in  Junior  year  served  as  secretary  of 
the  University  Boat  Club  and  of  the  University  Club. 

He  entered  the  St.  Louis  Law  School  after  graduation, 
and  in  1888,  on  receiving  his  LL.B.,  delivered  the  Com- 
mencement oration.  The  next  year  was  spent  in  graduate 
work  in  law  there,  and  at  the  same  time  he  was  engaged 
in  the  management  of  his  father's  estate.  In  1898,  he 
became  connected  with  the  Mississippi  Valley  Trust  Com- 
pany as  assistant  trust  officer,  nine  years  later  was  made 
assistant  executive  officer,  and  at  the  time  of  his  death  was 
a  vice  president  and  a  director  and  member  of  its  executive 
committee.  He  was  an  expert  in  railroad  finance  and  con- 
struction, and  rendered  important  services  of  this  nature 
to  the  company.  He  also  held  the  position  of  manager  of 
the  Ames  Realty  Company  from  1889  until  his  death,  which 
occurred  January  16,  1916,  at  his  home  in  St.  Louis,  as  the 
result  of  a  brief  illness  from  bronchial  pneumonia,  com- 
plicated by  heart  trouble. 

Mr.  Ames,  who  was  unmarried,  resided  with  his  mother, 
by  whom  he  is  survived.  He  also  leaves  a  brother,  Edgar 
(B.A.  1890),  and  two  sisters. 


John  Christopher  Schwab,  B.A.   1886 

Born  April  i,  1865,  in  New  York  City- 
Died  January  12,  1916,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 

John  Christopher  Schwab,  son  of  Gustav  Schwab,  of  the 
firm  of  Oelrichs  &  Company,  was  born  April  i,  1865,  in 
New  York  City,  being  named  for  his  great-grandfather,  a 
privy  counsellor  of  Stuttgart,  Germany.  His  paternal 
grandparents  were  Gustav  Schwab,  a  German  poet  of  note, 
and  Sophie  (Gmelin)  Schwab.  His  mother  was  Catherine 
Elizabeth,  daughter  of  Laurence  Henry  and  Henrietta 
Margaretta  (Meier)  vonPost.  Through  her,  he  was 
descended  from  Heinrich  Melchior  Muhlenberg,  the  chief 
founder  of  the  Lutheran  Church  in  America. 

He  was  fitted  for  Yale  under  private  tutors  and  at  Gib- 
bons' and  Beach's  School  in  New  York  City.     He  received 


Tl8  YALE   COLLEGE 

several  prizes  in  English  and  Latin  composition,  High  Ora- 
tion appointments,  and  was  a  member  of  Phi  Beta  Kappa 
in  college.  As  a  Sophomore,  he  sang  on  his  Class  Glee 
Club,  and  the  next  year  he  was  a  member  of  the  Second 
Glee  Club.  He  was  an  editor  of  the  Couramt  in  Senior 
year. 

He  remained  at  Yale  for  a  year  of  post-graduate  study 
in  political  economy  after  taking  the  degree  of  B.A.  in 
1886,  and  during  this  period  was  also  an  instructor  in 
German  at  the  Hopkins  Grammar  School.  In  July,  1887, 
he  went  to  Europe,  and  after  spending  the  summer  in 
travel,  entered  the  University  of  Berlin.  His  studies  for 
the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Philosophy  were  completed  at  the 
University  of  Gottingen  in  1889,  and  he  then  returned  to 
the  United  States  and  spent  some  time  in  historical  research 
in  the  libraries  of  New  York  City.  He  had  received  an 
M.A.  in  course  at  Yale  in  1888.  In  the  fall  of  1890,  he 
took  up  his  work  as  lecturer  in  political  economy  at  the 
University,  being  made  an  instructor  in  that  department  in 
the  following  year.  He  was  promoted  to  an  assistant  pro- 
fessorship in  1893,  and  to  a  full  professorship  five  years 
afterwards. 

In  1905,  after  seven  years  of  service  in  that  capacity. 
Professor  Schwab  was  chosen  University  librarian,  and 
the  remainder  of  his  life  was  devoted  to  the  upbuilding  of 
the  Library.  A  member  of  the  University  Council  since  his 
appointment  as  librarian,  he  had  served  for  some  years  on 
the  Council's  Committee  on  Publications,  in  connection  with 
the  work  of  the  University  Press. 

In  1 901,  he  supervised  the  arrangements  for  the  Yale 
Bicentennial  as  chairman  of  the  committee  in  charge  of  the 
celebration.  He  was  a  frequent  contributor  to  historical 
journals  and  magazines,  and  at  one  time  was  editor  of  the 
Yale  Review'.  ''The  Finances  of  the  Confederate  States  of 
America,"  published  by  Professor  Schwab  in  1901,  is  con- 
sidered a  valuable  addition  in  the  field  of  economic  history. 
He  was  elected  Secretary  of  the  Yale  Class  of  1886  in  1905, 
and  held  that  office  until  his  death.  To  the  work  of  civic 
betterment  in  New  Haven,  Professor  Schwab  gave  much  of 
his  attention,  and  at  the  time  of  his  death  he  was  serving  as 
secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  social  settlement  known  as 
Lov^ell  House.     He  was  also  president  of  the  Model  Hous- 


1886-1887  119 

ing  Association  of  New  Haven.  He  was  on  the  board  of 
trustees  of  the  New  Haven  Public  Library  and  a  member 
of  St.  Paul's  Protestant  Episcopal  Church,  of  whose  Sun- 
day school  he  was  at  one  time  superintendent,  and  for 
several  years  served  in  Company  F,  Second  Regiment, 
Connecticut  National  Guard.  He  was  a  trustee  of  Mount 
Holyoke  College,  and  in  19 13  was  on  the  committee  which 
arranged  the  pageant  held  in  celebration  of  the  seventy-fifth 
anniversary  of  its  founding.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
American  and  British  Economic  associations,  the  Con- 
necticut Academy  of  Arts  and  Sciences,  the  American 
Library  Association,  and  of  the  Century  Club  of  New  York. 
In  191 1,  he  received  from  Muhlenberg  College  the  honorary 
degree  of  LL.D. 

Professor  Schwab's  death  occurred  unexpectedly  at  his 
home  in  New  Haven,  January  12,  1916,  after  a  brief  illness 
from  pneumonia.  He  was  buried  in  Grove  Street  Cemetery 
in  that  city. 

On  October  5,  1893,  he  was  married  in  New  Haven  to 
Edith  Aurelia,  daughter  of  Samuel  Sparks  Fisher,  upon 
whom  Yale  conferred  an  honorary  degree  in  185 1,  and 
Aurelia  Safford  (Crossette)  Fisher.  She  survives  him  with 
their  two  children :  Katharine  Fisher,  a  student  at  Vassar, 
and  Norman  vonPost.  He  leaves  also  two  brothers  and 
three  sisters,  one  of  the  latter  being  the  widow  of  Henry 
Charles  White  (B.A.  1881,  LL.B.  1883,  M.L.  1884). 
Another  brother,  Laurence  Henry,  graduated  from  the  Col- 
lege in  1878.  Gustav  Schwab  (B.A.  1902)  and  Laurence 
vonPost  Schwab  (B.A.  191 3)  are  nephews. 


Victor  Bush  Caldwell,  B.A.  1887 

Born  February  14,  1864,  in  Omaha,  Nebr. 
Died  December  26,  191S,  in  Omaha,  Nebr. 

Victor  Bush  Caldwell,  one  of  the  four  children  of  Smith 
Samuel  and  Henrietta  McGrath  (Bush)  Caldwell,  was  born 
in  Omaha,  Nebr.,  February  14,  1864.  His  father,  the  son 
of  Joseph  Caldwell,  who  was  graduated  from  the  University 
of  North  Carolina,  and  the  grandson  of  Samuel  Harker 
Caldwell,   was   a  graduate   of  Union   College   and   of   the 


I20  YALE   COLLEGE 

Albany  Law  School,  and  for  many  years  was  senior  partner 
in  the  banking  house  of  Caldwell,  Hamilton  &  Company, 
which  subsequently  became  the  United  States  National 
Bank  of  Omaha.  The  earliest  member  of  the  Caldwell 
family  to  settle  in  this  country  was  John  Caldwell,  who 
came  from  Ireland  to  Pennsylvania  in  1760,  later  going  to 
North  Carolina.  Victor  Caldwell's  mother  was  the  daugh- 
ter of  Jabin  Strong  and  Eliza  (DePui)  Bush,  her  ancestors 
being  among  the  first  white  settlers  in  the  Chenango  Valley 
in  New  York,  having  emigrated  from  Holland.  He  attended 
the  Racine  (Wis.)  Grammar  School  and  Phillips  Academy, 
Andover,  Mass.,  before  entering  Yale  in  1883. 

Since  graduating,  he  had  been  connected  with  the  United 
States  National  Bank  of  Omaha,  and  at  the  time  of  his 
death  was  serving  as  its  president,  having  been  elected  to 
that  office  in  191 5.  He  was  also  vice  president  of  the 
United  States  Trust  Company,  a  director  of  the  Union 
Stock  Yards  Company  and  the  Douglas  Hotel  Company, 
of  Omaha,  and  president  of  J.  W.  Hugus  &  Company,  a 
mercantile  and  banking  house  of  Colorado.  From  191 1  to 
1913,  he  was  a  member  of  the  executive  council  of  the 
American  Bankers  Association,  and  he  had  also  held  the 
office  of  president  of  the  Omaha  Clearing  House  Associa- 
tion. For  several  years  previous  to  his  death,  Mr.  Caldwell 
represented  the  Yale  Alumni  Association  of  Nebraska  on 
the  Alumni  Advisory  Board.  He  had  served  on  several 
charitable  and  public  boards,  and,  since  1905,  had  been 
junior  warden  of  All  Saints'  Protestant  Episcopal  Church. 

His  death,  which  was  due  to  an  attack  of  acute  Bright's 
disease,  complicated  by  asthma  and  heart  trouble,  occurred 
in  Omaha,  December  26,  1915.  He  was  buried  in  Prospect 
Hill  Cemetery,  that  city. 

He  was  married  in  Pasadena,  Cal.,  October  10,  1888,  to 
Nellie  Rees,  daughter  of  John  W.  and  Annetta  Olivia 
(Rees)  Hugus.  She  survives  him  with  their  four  sons: 
John  Hugus  (B.A.  1912,  LL.B.  Creighton  University  1913)  ; 
Victor  Bush,  Jr.,  a  member  of  the  Class  of  1916;  Jabin 
Bush,  and  David  Rees. 


i887  121 

Sanford  Ellsworth  Cobb,  B.A.  1887 

Born  February  ii,  1866,  in  Tarrytown,  N.  Y. 
Died  July  11,  1915,  in  Pasadena,  Cal. 

Sanford  Ellsworth  Cobb  was  born  at  Tarrytown,  N.  Y., 
February  11,  1866,  the  son  of  Rev.  Henry  Nitchie  Cobb 
(B.A.  1855,  D.D.  Rutgers  1878),  who  served  for  several 
years  after  his  graduation  from  Union  Theological  Semi- 
nary in  1857  as  a  missionary  in  Persia,  and,  from  1883  to 
1910,  as  corresponding  secretary  of  the  Board  of  Foreign 
Missions  of  the  Reformed  Church  in  America.  Dr.  Cobb 
was  the  son  of  Sanford  and  Sophia  Lewis  (Nitchie)  Cobb 
and  a  descendant  of  Henry  Cobb,  who  came  from  England 
in  1629  and  was  for  many  years  deputy  to  the  general 
court  of  Plymouth  Colony;  his  ancestors  also  included 
John  Howland  and  John  Tilley,  signers  of  the  Mayflower 
compact,  and  Rev.  James  Noyes,  one  of  the  founders  of 
Yale  College.  Sanford  E.  Cobb's  mother,  who  was  Matilda 
Emeline,  daughter  of  Matthew  Thomas  and  Maria  (Suy- 
dam)  VanZandt,  for  twenty-three  years  edited  the  Mission 
Gleaner.  Through  her,  he  was  descended  from  Jan  Van- 
Santen,  who  settled  in  Albany  in  1693,  having  emigrated 
from  Holland. 

He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  the  Seymour  Smith  Institute, 
Pine  Plains,  N.  Y.,  and  at  Phillips  (Andover)  Academy. 
He  received  a  Dispute  appointment  in  Junior  year  and  a 
Colloquy  at  Commencement. 

For  twenty-three  years  following  his  graduation,  Mr. 
Cobb  was  connected  with  the  Atlantic  Mutual  Insurance 
Company  of  New  York,  a  marine  insurance  company,  but 
in  1910  he  was  compelled  by  ill  health  to  resign  his  office  as- 
second  vice  president  of  the  company  and  retire  from  active 
work. 

The  remainder  of  his  life  was  spent  at  Lamanda  Park, 
near  Pasadena,  Cal.,  and  his  death  occurred  in  Pasadena, 
July  II,  1915,  after  a  brief  illness  from  pneumonia.  Inter- 
ment was  in  Mountain  View  Cemetery  in  that  city. 

While  in  the  East,  he  lived  at  East  Orange,  N.  J.,  where 
he  was  a  trustee  of  the  Central  Presbyterian  Church  and  a 
member  of  the  Young  Men's  Christian  Association.  He 
belonged  to  the  New  England  Society,  the  American  Geo- 
graphical Society,  and  the  Life  Saving  Benevolent  Asso- 


122  YALE    COLLEGE 

elation,  and  had  held  various  offices  in  the  Yale  Alumni 
Association  of  Essex  County.  For  four  years,  he  served  in 
the  First  Battalion,  New  York  Naval  MiHtia,  which  he 
assisted  in  organizing. 

On  September  6,  1905,  he  was  married  in  Los  Angeles, 
Cal.,  to  Margaret  Brown,  daughter  of  Dr.  Archibald  Lyle 
MacLeish  and  Grace  Helen  (Peffers)  MacLeish,  who  sur- 
vives him  with  four  children:  Sanford,  Henry  VanZandt, 
Helen  Evertson,  and  Margaret  MacLeish.  His  uncles, 
Oliver  Ellsworth  Cobb  and  Sanford  Hoadley  Cobb,  gradu- 
ated from  the  College  in  1853  and  1858,  respectively. 


Francis  Cochrane,  B.A.   1887 

Born  January  13,  1863,  in  Coxsackie,  N.  Y. 
Died  February  14,  1916,  in  New  York  City 

Francis  Cochrane  was  born  January  13,  1863,  in  Cox- 
sackie, N.  Y.,  where  his  father,  Francis  Cochrane,  was 
engaged  in  farming  for  over  sixty  years.  The  latter  was 
the  son  of  John  R.  Cochrane,  who  came  to  this  country 
from  Ireland  in  1824,  and  settled  in  Vermont.  His  mother 
was  Barbara,  daughter  of  Aaron  L  and  Helena  (Whitbeck) 
VanSchaick ;  her  ancestors  came  from  Holland  to  Coxsackie 
two  hundred  years  ago. 

The  son  attended  Claverack  Academy  and  the  Hudson 
River  Institute  at  Claverack,  N.  Y.,  and  entered  Y'ale  from 
Williston  Seminary,  Easthampton,  Mass.  In  his  Sophomore 
year,  he  received  a  first  prize  for  declamation. 

During  the  first  two  years  after  graduation,  while  taking 
^p  the  study  of  law,  he  taught  at  Hudson  Academy.  He 
was  admitted  to  the  bar  of  New  York  State  in  1889,  and 
then  served  for  two  years  as  a  clerk  in  the  law  office  of 
Waldo  Grant  Morse,  a  non-graduate  member  of  the  Class 
of  1881  at  the  University  of  Rochester,  in  New  York  City. 
In  1898,  after  teaching  at  the  Episcopal  Academy  at  Chesh- 
ire, Conn.,  and  at  the  Drisler  School  in  New  York  and 
being  for  a  time  engaged  in  private  tutoring,  he  again 
became  associated  with  Mr.  Morse  in  practice,  and  had 
since  followed  his  profession  in  New  York  City.  For  some 
years,  his  summer  home  had  been  at  Hudson,  N.  Y.  In 
1895,  he  took  a  short  trip  through  the  Netherlands.     He 


i887  123 

was  a  member  of  the  Dutch  Reformed  Church.  In  1899 
and  1900,  he  served  as  vice  president  of  the  Repubhcan 
Club  of  the  thirteenth  assembly  district  of  New  York.  He 
belonged  to  the  New  York  County  Lawyers  Association  and 
the  New  York  State  Bar  Association. 

Mr.  Cochrane  died  February  14,  1916,  at  the  Roosevelt 
Hospital  in  New  York  City,  after  an  illness  of  about  a 
week  which  followed  an  operation  for  appendicitis.  Burial 
was  in  Hudson  City  Cemetery  at  Hudson. 

On  October  30,  1902,  he  was  married  in  Hudson  to 
Frances  Rice,  daughter  of  James  Charles  and  Cornelia 
(Moseley)  Rogerson.  Mrs.  Cochrane,  who  survives  her 
husband,  graduated  from  Smith  College  in  1891.  Two 
daughters,  Cornelia  Rogerson  and  Frances  Barbara,  are 
also  living.  Mr.  Cochrane  was  a  brother  of  Aaron  Van- 
Schaick  Cochrane  (B.A.  1879)  whose  son,  Francis  Aaron, 
graduated  from  the  Scientific  School  in  1914. 


Thomas  Norwood  Penrose,  B.A.   1887 

Born  March  26,  1864,  in  Philadelphia,  Pa. 
Died  December   17,  1915,  in  Bryn  Mawr,  Pa. 

Thomas  Norwood  Penrose  was  born  in  Philadelphia,  Pa., 
March  26,  1864,  the  son  of  Thomas  Neall  Penrose  and  a 
descendant  of  Thomas  Penrose,  who  came  to  America  from 
England  in  1698  and  settled  at  Philadelphia.  His  father 
attended  the  Philadelphia  College  of  Pharmacy,  received 
the  degree  of  M.D.  from  the  University  of  Pennsylvania  in 
1858,  later  taking  that  of  Ph.D. ;  he  served  as  an  officer  in 
the  Medical  Corps  of  the  United  States  Navy  from  the 
outbreak  of  the  Civil  War  until  his  death. 

He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  the  Episcopal  Academy  in 
Philadelphia,  and  received  Dispute  scholarship  appointments 
in  Junior  and  Senior  years. 

Two  years  after  his  graduation  from  Yale,  he  received 
the  degree  of  LL.B.  from  Columbia,  and  was  admitted  to 
the  New  York  Bar.  Subsequently,  he  took  a  course  cover- 
ing one  year  in  the  School  of  Mines  at  Columbia,  and  later, 
after  a  number  of  years  during  which  he  was  not  engaged 
in  any  business,  he  became  connected  with  the  law  depart- 
ment of  the  Lawyers  Title  Insurance  &  Trust  Company  of 


124  YALE    COLLEGE 

New  York.  His  home  was  at  Wayne,  Pa.,  during  the  latter 
part  of  his  life.  For  some  years,  he  had  suffered  severely 
from  rheumatism,  and  he  died  at  the  Bryn  Mawr  (Pa.) 
Hospital,  December  17,  1915.  Mr.  Penrose  was  not 
married. 


George  Barber  Fowler,  B.A.  1888 

Born  June  25,  1867,  in  Thompsonville,  Conn. 
Died  November  23,  1915,  in  Detroit,  Mich. 

George  Barber  Fowler  was  born  in  Thompsonville,  Conn., 
June  25,  1867,  his  father  being  Royal  Augustus  Fowler, 
a  merchant,  who  served  as  a  quartermaster  during  the  Civil 
War  and,  in  1867,  as  a  member  of  the  Connecticut  Legisla- 
ture. His  mother  was  Ellen  Hannah,  daughter  of  George 
Harvey  and  Silena  (Henry)  Barber.  He  entered  Yale 
from  the  Hartford  (Conn.)  Public  High  School  in  1884, 
sang  on  the  Glee  Club,  and,  in  his  Senior  year,  was  financial 
manager  of  the  Record.  He  received  Dispute  appoint- 
ments, and  spoke  at  Junior  Exhibition. 

After  serving  during  the  summer  of  1888  as  a  reporter 
on  the  staff  of  the  Springfield  (Mass.)  Union,  he  entered 
the  law  office  of  Briscoe  &  Andrews  in  Hartford.  In  the 
autumn  of  1889,  he  returned  to  New  Haven  to  continue  his 
studies  in  the  School  of  Law,  from  which  he  was  graduated 
with  the  degree  of  LL.B.  cum  laude  the  next  summer. 
Upon  his  admission  to  the  bar,  he  began  to  practice  in  Hart- 
ford as  junior  member  of  the  firm  of  Briscoe  &  Fowler. 
His  home  at  that  time  was  at  Thompsonville,  where  he 
served  during  a  part  of  1891  and  1892  as  town  clerk  and 
treasurer,  filling  a  vacancy  caused  by  death.  In  1899, 
he  moved  to  Detroit,  Mich.,  and  the  next  year  became  a 
member  of  the  law  firm  of  McDonald  &  Fowler,  being 
associated  with  Charles  S.  McDonald,  a  non-graduate  of  the 
University  of  Michigan.  This  connection  was  discontinued 
in  191 1,  and  since  that  time  Mr.  Fowler  had  practiced  alone. 
He  was  a  director  in  the  McCreery  Engineering  Company 
of  Detroit  and  Toledo  (of  which  he  had  also  served  as 
president  from  1906  to  May,  1908),  the  Scotten-Dillon 
Company,  the  Woodbridge  Building  Company,  and  the 
Lenawee  County  Gas  &  Electric  Company,  being  also  secre- 


I 887-1 890  125 

tary  and  treasurer  of  the  last-named  company.  With 
James  P.  Andrews  (B.A.  1877,  LL.B.  1879),  ^^  was  the 
author  of  the  "Revised  Index  Digest  of  the  Connecticut 
Law  Reports." 

His  death  occurred  at  his  home  in  Detroit,  November  23, 
191 5,  after  an  ihness  of  several  months  resulting  from 
cancer.     Burial  was  in  Woodlawn  Cemetery  in  that  city. 

He  was  married  in  Detroit,  May  18,  1899,  to  Grace  Mary, 
daughter  of  Delos  Louis  and  Mary  M.  Filer.  She  died  on 
June  5,  1912.  Of  their  two  children,  the  daughter,  Barbara, 
died  at  the  age  of  six  months,  while  the  son,  Delos  Royal, 
survives. 


Otis  King  Hutchinson,  B.A.  1890 

Born  October  25,  1868,  in  Chicago,  111. 
Died  March  26,   1916 

It  has  been  impossible  to  secure  the  desired  information 
for  an  obituary  sketch  of  Mr.  Hutchinson  in  time  for  pub- 
lication in  this  volume.  A  sketch  will  appear  in  a  subse- 
quent issue  of  the  Obituary  Record. 


John  Howard  Sherwood,  B.A.  1890 

Born  September  i,  1869,  at  Cornwall-on-Hudson,  N.  Y. 
Died  January  25,  191 5,  in  Englewood,  N.  J. 

John  Howard  Sherwood,  one  of  the  four  children  of 
John  D.  and  Emmeline  Catherine  (Zimmerman  nee  Dunn) 
Sherwood,  was  born  September  i,  1869,  at  Cornwall-on- 
Hudson,  N.  Y.,  being  the  grandson  of  Thomas  and  Ruth 
(DuBois)  Sherwood.  His  father,  a  graduate  of  the  Col- 
lege in  1839,  practiced  law  for  a  number  of  years,  and 
served  as  a  colonel  on  the  staff  of  Gen.  James  S.  Wads- 
worth  during  the  Civil  War.  His  mother's  parents  were 
Charles  and  Polly  Dunn. 

He  entered  Yale  from  the  Englewood  (N.  J.)  Classical 
School,  and  in  Junior  year  was  given  an  Oration  appoint- 
ment, receiving  a  Dissertation  at  Commencement. 


126  YALE    COLLEGE 

Soon  after  graduation,  Mr.  Sherwood  took  a  position  in 
the  pubhshing  department  of  the  New  York  Evening  Post, 
with  which  he  was  connected  until  September,  1897.  He 
was  then  for  ten  years  employed  in  the  business  depart- 
ment of  the  New  York  Commercial  Advertiser  (later  The 
Globe).  In  1907,  he  entered  the  banking  and  brokerage 
business  in  New  York  as  cashier  with  the  firm  of  Jewett 
Brothers,  retaining  that  connection  until  May,  1913.  In  the 
fall  of  1914,  after  spending  the  intervening  period  at  his 
home  in  Englewood,  he  began  work  for  the  Crowell  Pub- 
lishing Company  in  New  York,  where  he  was  until  his 
death,  which  occurred  January  25,  191 5,  at  his  mother's 
home  in  Englewood,  as  the  result  of  heart  trouble,  from 
which  he  had  suffered  for  some  little  time.  Interment  was 
in  Brookside  Cemetery,  Englewood. 

Mr.  Sherwood  was  not  married.  He  was  a  member  of 
the  Presbyterian  Church  in  Englewood. 


Gouverneur  Calhoun,  B.A.  1891 

Born  September  11,  1868,  in  Chicago,  111. 
Died  May  15,  1916,  in  St.  Louis,  Mo. 

Gouverneur  Calhoun  was  born  September  11,  1868,  in 
Chicago,  111.,  the  son  of  John  B.  Calhoun,  the  first  treasurer 
in  Illinois  of  the  Illinois  Central  Railroad  Company.  He 
entered  Yale  from  the  Hyde  Park  High  School,  Chicago, 
in  1886,  but  left  the  Class  of  1890  at  the  end  of  Sophomore 
year,  joining  the  Class  with  which  he  was  graduated  the 
next  fall.  He  was  captain  of  the  University  Baseball  Team 
for  two  years  in  succession,  each  year  winning  the  cham- 
pionship, and  an  editor  of  the  Record  in  Senior  year. 

From  November,  1891,  to  June,  1893,  Mr.  Calhoun  had 
a  position  in  the  superintendent's  office  of  the  Lake  Shore 
&  Michigan  Southern  Railway,  and  for  the  next  five  months 
was  in  charge  of  the  American  Telephone  &  Telegraph 
Company's  exhibit  at  the  World's  Fair.  He  was  then 
appointed  district  superintendent  of  the  American  Tele- 
phone &  Telegraph  Company  at  Cincinnati,  Ohio,  later 
being  transferred  to  Indianapolis,  Ind.  Since  1898,  he  had 
made  his  headquarters  in  St.  Louis,  Mo.,  at  first  holding 
the  position  of  district  superintendent  and  afterwards,  until 


1890-1891  .  127 

his  death,  that  of  commercial  representative.  Mr.  Calhoun 
enjoyed  a  wide  reputation  as  an  after-dinner  speaker  at 
college  and  other  social  gatherings,  and,  upon  the  opening 
of  new  telephone  exchanges  in  various  cities,  often  made 
addresses  over  the  long-distance  telephone  to  the  guests 
assembled  at  the  dedication.  He  served  a  few  years  ago 
as  president  of  the  Yale  Alumni  Association  of  St.  Louis, 
having  always  taken  a  prominent  part  in  the  affairs  of  that 
organization. 

His  death  occurred  at  his  home  in  St.  Louis,  May  15, 
19 16,  after  an  illness  of  two  weeks  due  to  acute  rheuma- 
tism, complicated  by  heart  trouble. 

Mr.  Calhoun  was  married  in  St.  Louis,  April  30,  1902,  to 
Felicia  Eakin,  daughter  of  Frederick  Newton  Judson 
(B.A.  1866,  LL.B.  Washington  University  1871)  and  Jane 
W.  (Eakin)  Judson  and  granddaughter  of  Frederick  Joseph 
Judson,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1824  and  of  the  School 
of  Medicine  in  1829.  She  survives  him  without  children. 
Mr.  Calhoun  is  also  survived  by  his  sister,  the  wife  of 
Henry  Burrall  Mason  (B.A.  1870,  LL.B.  Columbia  1874). 


Ernest  Chadwick,  B.A.   1891 

Born  March  21,  1868,  in  Old  Lyme,  Conn. 
Died  May  4,  1916,  in  Old  Lyme,  Conn. 

Ernest  Chadwick  was  born  March  21,  1868,  in  Old  Lyme, 
Conn.,  his  father  being  Daniel  Chadwick  (B.A.  1845),  one 
of  the  foremost  lawyers  of  his  day  in  Connecticut,  where 
he  served  as  United  States  district  attorney,  state  senator, 
and,  ex  officio,  as  a  member  of  the  Yale  Corporation.  He 
was  the  grandson  of  Daniel  and  Nancy  (Waite)  Chadwick, 
the  latter  being  the  sister  of  Henry  Matson  Waite  (B.A. 
1809,  LL.D.  1855),  a  chief  justice  of  the  Supreme  Court 
of  Connecticut,  and  a  descendant  of  Thomas  Waite,  who 
emigrated  to  America  from  Sudbury,  England.  The 
founder  of  the  Chadwick  family  in  this  country  Was  Charles 
Chadwick,  who  came  from  England  in  1630  to  Watertown, 
Mass.,  and  was  a  member  of  the  Colonial  Legislature  from 
1657  to  1659  ;  the  family  home  has  been  at  Old  Lyme  since 
1681.  Ernest  Chadwick's  mother  was  Ellen,  daughter  of 
Enoch  and  Clarissa   (Dutton)    Noyes.     She  was  a  direct 


128  .  YALE    COLLEGE 

descendant  of  Rev.  James  Noyes  of  Choulderton,  Wiltshire, 
England,  the  first  minister  at  Newbury,  Mass.,  whose  son, 
Rev.  Moses  Noyes,  first  pastor  of  the  Congregational 
Church  in  Lyme  (1666-1726),  was  a  trustee  of  Yale  College 
from  1703  to  1729,  and  who  was  a  brother  of  Rev.  James 
Noyes,  one  of  the  founders  of  Yale.  Elder  William 
Brewster  of  the  Mayflower  and  Nathaniel  Lynde,  first 
treasurer  of  the  College,  were  also  ancestors.  Among  his 
many  Yale  relatives  were  his  cousins,  Morrison  Remick 
Waite  (B.A,  1837),  chief  justice  of  the  United  States 
Supreme  Court,  and  Judge  Richard  Waite  (B.A.  1853)  ;  an 
uncle  by  marriage,  Rev.  David  S.  Brainerd  (B.A.  1834),  a 
Fellow  of  the  Corporation,  and  Dr.  John  Noyes  (B.A. 
1753),  a  surgeon  in  the  Revolutionary  Army  and  a  member 
of  the  Order  of  the  Cincinnati. 

He  entered  Yale  in  1887  from  the  Black  Hall  School  in 
his  native  town,  being  graduated  four  years  later.  In  1893, 
he  received  the  degree  of  LL.B.  from  the  New  York  Law 
School,  and  was  then  admitted  to  the  New  York  Bar.  For 
a  time,  he  was  in  the  office  of  Piatt  &  Bowers  in  New  York 
City,  but  since  1895  he  had  followed  his  profession  in  New 
London,  Conn.  In  December,  1899,  he  was  appointed 
prosecuting  agent  for  New  London  County,  and  since  then 
had  practiced  quite  extensively  in  the  state  courts.  He  was 
a  member  of  the  First  Church  of  Christ  (Congregational) 
of  Old  Lyme. 

His  home  had  been  at  Old  Lyme  since  birth,  and  he  died 
there  May  4,  1916,  after  an  illness  of  three  months,  due  to 
septic  endocarditis.     Burial  was  in  the  local  cemetery. 

On  April  18,  1899,  he  was  married  in  Brooklyn,  N.  Y., 
to  Gertrude  E.,  daughter  of  Albert  Baxter  and  Mary 
(Rowden)  King  and  sister. of  A.  Rowden  King,  a  graduate 
of  the  College  in  1906.  She  survives  him  with  two  sons, 
Guy  Mavesyn  and  Daniel.  His  brother,  Charles  Noyes 
Chadwick  (B.A.  1870),  received  the  honorary  degree  of 
M.A.  from  Yale  in  1897.  The  latter's  sons,  Charles  and 
George  Brewster,  graduated  from  the  University  with  the 
degrees  of  B.A.  in  1897  and  1903,  respectively.  Mr.  Chad- 
wick's  only  surviving  sister  is  the  wife  of  Elford  Parry 
Trowbridge  (B.A.  1887). 


1891-1893  129 


Rufus  Macqueen  Gibbs,  B.A.  1893 

Born  December  i,  1871,  in  New  Orleans,  La. 
Died  February  5,  1916,  in  Baltimore,  Md. 

Rufus  Macqueen  Gibbs,  son  of  John  Sears  and  Helen 
(Macqueen)  Gibbs,  was  born  in  New  Orleans,  La.,  Decem- 
ber I,  187 1.  His  father's  parents  were  Rufus  and  Adeline 
(Sears)  Gibbs,  and  his  mother  was  the  daughter  of  Peter 
and  Sara  (Sullivan)  Macqueen.  He  prepared  for  Yale  at 
the  Carey  School  in  Baltimore  and  at  St.  Paul's  School, 
Concord,  N.  H.  In  Freshman  year  at  Yale,  he  was  awarded 
one  of  the  Berkeley  premiums ;  he  contributed  numerous 
poems  to  the  College  papers,  and  in  Senior  year  served  on 
the  Courant  board  and  was  elected  to  Chi  Delta  Theta;  he 
was  chosen  Class  Poet,  and  wrote  the  Class  Day  poem  and 
later  others  for  the  various  Class  reunions. 

After  spending  the  first  year  following  his  graduation  on 
the  staff  of  the  University  Magazine  of  New  York  City,  Mr. 
Gibbs  returned  to  Baltimore,  and  entered  his  father's  busi- 
ness, the  Gibbs  Preserving  Company,  as  vice  president. 
Eight  years  later,  he  was  made  president,  and  served  in  that- 
capacity  until  his  death.  Lie  had  also  been  president  of  the 
Canned  Goods  Exchange  of  Baltimore,  and  was  a  director 
of  the  Maryland  Trust  Company.  From  1913  to  1915,  he 
served  as  president  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  Baltimore. 
He  was  a  vestryman  of  Christ  Protestant  Episcopal  Church, 
and  shortly  before  his  death  had  been  instrumental  in  organ- 
izing a  men's  club  in  connection  with  it.  He  had  taken  an 
active  part  in  public  affairs,  being  vice  president  of  the 
Maryland  League  for  Defense  and  a  member  of  the  board 
of  managers  of  the  Maryland  School  for  Boys. 

His  death,  which  was  unexpected,  occurred  in  Baltimore, 
February  5, 1916,  and  followed  an  operation  for  the  removal 
of  a  tumor  at  the  base  of  the  brain.  He  was  buried  in 
Loudon  Park  Cemetery  at  Baltimore. 

He  was  married  in  New  York  City,  April  20,  1898,  to 
Cornelia  Noyes,  daughter  of  James  F.  and  Harriet  (Noyes) 
Andrews,  who  survives  him  with  four  children:  Helen 
Macqueen,  Harriet  Constance,  Frederick  Andrews,  and 
Marian  Hungerford. 


130  YALE    COLLEGE 


Ralph  Longenecker,  B.A.   1894 

Born  October  6,  1873,  in  Bedford,  Pa. 
Died  March  i,  1916,  in  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

Ralph  Longenecker  was  born  October  6,  1873,  i"  Bedford, 
Pa.,  being  one  of  three  children  of  Jacob  H.  Longenecker, 
a  graduate  of  the  Albany  Law  School  in  1866,  who  served 
as  adjutant  in  the  One  Hundred  and  First  Regiment,  Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers,  during  the  Civil  War  and  later  was 
judge  of  the  sixteenth  judicial  district  of  Pennsylvania, 
and  Rebecca  (Russell)  Longenecker.  The  founder  of  the 
American  branch  of  the  Longenecker  family,  Ulrich  Longe- 
necker, came  to  Chester  County,  Pennsylvania,  in  1733  from 
Switzerland.  Through  his  mother,  who  was  the  daughter 
of  Samuel  Lypn  and  Nancy  (Reamer)  Russell,  Ralph 
Longenecker  was  of  Scotch-Irish  descent,  an  ancestor 
being  James  Russell,  who  settled  in  Menallen  Township, 
York  County  (now  Adams  County),  Pennsylvania. 

He  was  prepared  for  Yale  at  the  Blair  Presbyterial  Acad- 
emy, Blairstown,  N.  J.,  and  in  his  Junior  year  received  a 
Dispute  appointment,  being  given  a  Colloquy  at  Commence- 
ment. 

After  studying  law  for  a  while  in  his  native  town  follow- 
ing his  graduation,  he  completed  his  course  at  the  Pitts- 
burgh Law  School  in  1897.  He  was  honor  man  in  his 
Class  there,  and  in  June,  1897,  was  admitted  to  the  bar 
of  Allegheny  County,  having  the  highest  standing  of  any 
of  the  candidates  admitted  at  that  time.  From  1897  until 
1902,  he  served  as  an  instructor  at  the  Pittsburgh  Law 
School.  His  first  professional  connection  was  with  the  firm 
of  McClung  &  Evans,  and  after  its  dissolution,  by  the 
election  of  Mr.  John  A.  Evans  to  the  bench,  he  was  for  a 
time  associated  with  the  senior  partner,  Mr.  William  H. 
McClung.  Later,  he  had  offices  with  Messrs.  Edwin  S. 
Craig,  L.  M.  Plumer,  and  Edward  B.  Scull,  practicing  on 
his  own  account.  In  1903,  he  became  solicitor  for  the  Iron 
City  Trust  Company,  giving  up  that  connection  in  1906 
to  enter  the  firm  of  Gordon  &  Smith,  which  was  organized 
at  that  time  and  with  which  he  continued  until  his  death, 
his  associates  being  George  Breed  Gordon  (LL.B.  Columbia 
1883)  ;     William    Watson    Smith    (B.A.    Princeton    1892, 


1894  13^ 

LL.B.  Pittsburgh  1896);  Allen  T.  C.  Gordon  (LL.B. 
George  Washington  1901),  and  Alexander  Black  (B.S. 
Princeton  1902,  LL.B.  Pittsburgh  1905). 

Mr.  Longenecker  was  an  active  member  of  the  Shadyside 
Presbyterian  Church.  He  died  March  i,  1916,  at  the 
Orthopaedic  Hospital  in  Philadelphia,  where  he  had  gone 
for  treatment  ior  congestion  of  the  arteries  of  the  brain, 
which  followed  a  severe  attack  of  the  grippe.  Burial  was 
in  the  Homewood  Cemetery  at  Pittsburgh. 

On  October  30,  1902,  he  was  married  in  that  city  to 
Grace  Chambers,  daughter  of  James  Smith  and  Emma 
(Chambers)  Humbird  and  sister  of  John  C.  Humbird,  a 
non-graduate  member  of  the  Sheffield  Class  of  1901.  Mrs. 
Longenecker's  sister  is  the  wife  of  Southard  Play  (Ph.B. 
1901).  Besides  his  wife,  Mr.  Longenecker  is  survived  by 
four  children — Catherine,  Eleanor,  Ralph,  Jr.,  and  John 
Russell — his  parents,  and  two  brothers,  one  of  the  latter 
being  Samuel  Russell  Longenecker,  who  studied  in  the  Col- 
lege during  1 890-1 891. 


Daniel  O'Day,  B.A.   1894 

Born  March  11,  1870,  in  Titusville,  Pa. 
Died  May  31,  1916,  in  Rye,  N,  Y. 

Daniel  O'Day,  one  of  the  eleven  children  of  Daniel  and 
Louise  (Newell)  O'Day,  was  born  March  11,  1870,  in 
Titusville,  Pa.  His  father  came  to  this  country  from  Ire- 
land in  1842,  and  became  vice  president  of  the  National 
Transit  Company  of  the  Standard  Oil  Company.  His 
mother  was  the  daughter  of  Anthony  and  Mary  (Burke) 
Newell ;  her  family  also  came  to  America  from  Ireland  in 
1842,  settling  at  Boston,  Mass. 

His  preparatory  training  was  received  at  Canisius  College 
in  Buffalo,  N.  Y.,  and  before  entering  Yale  in  1890  he  spent 
five  years  at  Georgetown  University,  Washington,  D.  C. 
He  left  the  Yale  Class  of  1894  at  the  end  of  Junior  year, 
but  in  1906  was  given  his  degree  and  enrolled  with  the 
Class. 

Until  1909,  Mr.  O'Day  was  employed  by  the  Standard 
Oil  Company,  and  since  that  time  he  had  been  associated 
with  his  brother,  Charles  O'Day,  as  a  producer  of  crude  oil. 


132  YALE   COLLEGE 

at  the  time  of  his  death  being  treasurer  of  the  Venango  Oil 
&  Land  Company.  He  was  interested  in  many  corporations 
operating  in  West  Virginia  and  Pennsylvania.  Mr.  O'Day 
was  a  member  of  the  Church  of  the  Resurrection,  Rye, 
N.  Y. 

He  had  lived  in  Rye  for  about  fifteen  years,  and  died 
there  at  his  home,  May  31,  1916.  He  had  been  ill  for 
several  months  following  an  attack  of  pneumonia,  but  was 
believed  to  be  recovering,  when  heart  trouble  developed, 
causing  his  death.  Burial  was  in  Kensico  Cemetery  at 
Kensico,  N.  Y. 

He  was  married  in  New  York  City,  May  i,  1900,  to 
Caroline  Love,  daughter  of  J.  and  Elia  Goodwin  of  Savan- 
nah, Ga.  She  survives  him  with  their  daughter,  Elia 
Warren,  and  their  two  sons,  Daniel,  Jr.,  and  Charles. 


Arthur  Bumstead,  B.A.  1895 

Born  February  9,  1873,  in  Minneapolis,  Minn. 
Died  August  18,  1915,  in  Rochester,  Minn. 

Arthur  Bumstead  was  born  in  Minneapolis,  Minn.,  Feb- 
ruary 9,  1873,  being  the  oldest  child  of  Rev.  Horace  Bum- 
stead (B.A.  1863,  D.D.  New  York  University  1881),  who 
served  as  a  major  in  the  Civil  War;  was  from  1875 
professor  in,  and  from  1888  to  1907  president  of,  Atlanta 
University,  and  is  now  engaged  in  religious  and  philan- 
thropic work,  and  Anna  (Hoit)  Bumstead.  His  paternal 
grandparents  were  Josiah  Freeman  and  Lucy  Douglas 
(Willis)  Bumstead,  and  through  them  he  was  a  descendant 
of  Thomas  Bumstead  and  George  Willis,  both  of  whom 
settled  in  New  England  in  the  seventeenth  century.  His 
mother  was  the  daughter  of  Albert  Gallatin  Hoit  (B.A. 
Dartmouth  1829),  a  portrait  painter  of  Boston,  and  Susan 
Ann  (Hanson)  Hoit  and  a  descendant  of  John  Hoyt  and 
Thomas  Hanson,  both  of  whom,  also,  settled  in  New 
England  in  the  seventeenth  century. 

Before  entering  Yale  as  a  Freshman  in  1891,  he  studied 
at  Atlanta  University  and  at  Phillips  (Andover)  Academy. 
In  Sophomore  year,  he  was  awarded  a  second  prize  in 
English  composition,  the  next  year  was  given  a  Dissertation 


1894-1895  133 

appointment,  and  at  Commencement  received  an  Oration 
appointment  and  two-year  honors  in  ancient  languages. 

During  the  five  years  following  his  graduation,  interrupted 
somewhat  by  teaching  engagements,  he  studied  Biblical 
literature  and  languages  in  the  Graduate  Schools  of  the 
University  of  Chicago  and  Yale,  and  in  1900  received  the 
degree  of  Ph.D.  from  Yale.  From  1896  to  1898,  Mr. 
Bumstead  served  as  an  instructor  in  Greek,  Biblical  litera- 
ture, and  philosophy  at  Atlanta  University.  In  1901,  he 
became  an  instructor  in  classics  at  the  Mercersburg  (Pa.) 
Academy,  and  the  next  year  accepted  a  position  as  principal 
of  the  high  school  at  Sterling,  Mass. 

Owing  to  impaired  health,  he  spent  the  summer  of  1905 
in  England.  On  his  return  to  America,  he  entered  the 
advertising  field,  after  a  thorough  preparation  for  this  work 
by  private  study  and  through  several  correspondence 
schools.  From  1906  to  191 1,  he  was  located  in  Kansas 
City,  Mo.  His  first  connection  was  with  the  editorial  staff 
of  the  Advertiser's  Magazine,  and  he  afterwards  held  a 
position  on  the  Board  of  Public  Welfare  under  the  Kansas 
City  municipal  government.  He  removed  to  Winnipeg, 
Manitoba,  Canada,  in  191 1,  and  until  the  outbreak  of  the 
European  War  was  engaged  in  publicity  work  for  the 
International  Securities  Company  in  their  affiliation  with 
the  Grand  Trunk  Pacific  Railway  and  in  editorial  work 
for  the  Dominion  Magazine.  He  was  a  frequent  contribu- 
tor to  other  periodicals  on  general  topics  of  the  day. 

He  was  originally  a  Congregationalist,  but  after  his 
removal  to  the  West  connected  himself  with  the  Disciples 
of  Christ,  and  was  active  in  the  churches  of  that  order  in 
the  cities  of  his  later  residence.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
Society  of  Biblical  Literature  and  Exegesis  and  of  the 
Religious  Education  Association. 

In  March,  19 15,  Mr.  Bumstead  went  to  Minneapolis, 
Minn.  His  health  had  been  for  some  time  declining,  and 
he  sought  relief  at  the  Mayo  Brothers'  Hospital  in  Roches- 
ter, Minn.  A  serious  surgical  operation  was  promising 
good  results,  when  pneumonia  developed,  and  he  died  on 
August  18,  191 5.  Burial  was  in  the  family  lot  in  Forest 
Hills  Cemetery,  Boston. 

He  was  married  on  July  19,  1902,  in  Hoboken,  N.  J.,  to 
Miss  Alice  Ward.  They  had  two  children:  Donald 
Douglas,  born  in  New  York  City,  May  7,  1903,  and  Marion, 


134  YALE    COLLEGE 

born  December  13,  1907,  in  Kansas  City,  Mo.,  where  she 
died  November  19,  1909.  One  of  Mr.  Bumstead's  two  sur- 
viving brothers,  Albert  Hoit,  studied  at  the  Worcester  Poly- 
technic Institute  and  at  Harvard,  and  the  other,  Ralph 
Willis,  took  his  B.A.  at  Yale  in  1903.  His  great-uncles, 
Nathaniel  Parker  Willis  and  Richard  Storrs  Willis,  and  his 
uncle,  Nathaniel  Willis  Bumstead,  graduated  from  the  Col- 
lege in  1827,  1841,  and  1855,  respectively.  His  second 
cousin,  Henry  A.  Bumstead  (B.A.  Johns  Hopkins  1891), 
of  the  present  Yale  Faculty,  received  the  degree  of  Ph.D. 
from  Yale  in  1897.  ^r.  Bumstead's  only  sister  (wife  of 
Lieut.  H.  R.  Jarvis  of  the  Royal  Field  Artillery,  now  serv- 
ing with  the  British  Army  in  France)  is  a  graduate,  in 
191 3,  of  the  Massachusetts  Normal  Art  School. 


Georg-e  Eli  Butler,  B.A.   1895 

Born  December  10,  1871,  in  Worthington,  Mass. 
Died  January  31,  1916,  in  Meriden,  Conn, 

George  Eli  Butler,  son  of  Edwin  Howell  Butler,  a  farmer, 
and  Maria  L.  (Brown)  Butler,  was  born  December  10, 
1871,  in  Worthington,  Mass.  He  entered  Yale  from  the 
Meriden  (Conn.)  High  School  in  1891,  his  home  at  that 
time  being  at  Kensington,  Conn.,  and  in  his  Senior  year 
was  given  a  Dispute  appointment. 

Since  graduation,  with  the  exception  of  the  winter  of 
1899,  during  which  he  worked  in  the  cost  department  of  the 
Russell  &  Erwin  Manufacturing  Company  of  New  Britain, 
Conn.,  Mr.  Butler  had  been  engaged  in  farming.  For  about 
five  years,  he  lived  on  the  home  farm  at  Kensington,  which 
he  had  purchased  in  1900.  In  1905,  he  removed  to  Meri- 
den, where  he  had  since  made  his  home,  his  farm  being 
known  as  "Fircrest,"  and  where  he  died  January  31,  1916. 

His  marriage  took  place  in  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  June  18, 
1898,  to  Margaret  Amelia,  daughter  of  John  Lewis  and 
Amelia  VanTine.  She  survives  him  with  five  children: 
Helen  VanTine,  Margaret  Juliet,  Edwin  Stewart,  Ruth 
Isabel,  and  Marion  Charlotte.  Their  third  daughter,  Doro- 
thy Marie,  died  November  5,  1906.  Mr.  Butler  was  a  half- 
brother  of  Joel  Ives  Butler  (Ph.B.  1897,  M.D.  Johns 
Hopkins  1901)  and  of  Albert  Norton  Butler  (B.A.  1900). 


i895  135 

(A  sketch  of  the  latter's  life  is  given  elsewhere  in  this 
volume.)  His  cousin,  Eli  Ives  Butler,  and  his  brother-in- 
law,  Walter  E.  Crittenden,  graduated  from  the  College  in 
1898  and  1900,  respectively. 


Benjamin  Stickney  Cable,  B.A.  1895 

Born  September  24,  1872,  in  Rock  Island,  III. 
Died  September  27,   191 5,  near  Ipswich,  Mass. 

Benjamin  Stickney  Cable,  son  of  Ransom  Read  Cable, 
for  many  years  president  of  the  Chicago,  Rock  Island  & 
Pacific  Railway,  and  Josephine  (Stickney)  Cable,  was  born 
September  24,  1872,  in  Rock  Island,  111.  His  father  was 
the  son  of  Hiram  and  Rachael  (Henry)  Cable,  and  was 
descended  from  John  Cable  (or  Cabell),  who  came  to  this 
country  from  Buckfastleigh,  England,  in  163 1  and  settled 
in  Massachusetts.  Through  his  mother,  whose  parents  were 
Benjamin  and  Sarah  Jane  (Powers)  Stickney,  he  was  a 
descendant,  in  the  tenth  generation,  of  William  Stickney, 
who  emigrated  to  Massachusetts  from  England  in  1638. 

He  was  prepared  for  Yale  at  the  Harvard  School,  Chi- 
cago, and  at  Phillips  Exeter  Academy,  and  in  college 
was  a  member  of  the  University  Club,  secretary  and 
treasurer  of  the  Intercollegiate  Football  Association  in 
1894,  and  president  of  the  University  Football  Association 
in  Senior  year. 

Mr.  Cable  spent  the  summer  after  graduation  abroad, 
upon  his  return  to  America  entering  the  Columbia  Law 
School,  where  he  received  the  degree  of  LL.B.  in  1898. 
In  November,  1899,  after  a  brief  connection  with  the  firm 
of  Lowden,  Estabrook  &  Davis  of  Chicago,  he  joined  the 
law  department  of  the  Chicago,  Rock  Island  &  Pacific 
Railway.  He  was  made  general  attorney  for  the  road 
in  1907,  and  held  that  position  for  the  next  two  years.  On 
November  30,  1909,  he  was  appointed  assistant  secretary 
of  commerce  and  labor,  and  served  in  that  capacity  until 
the  close  of  President  Taft's  administration.  After  a  period 
of  foreign  travel,  he  resumed  the  practice  of  his  profession 
in  Chicago  in  October,  1914. 

Mr.  Cable  died  near  Ipswich,  Mass.,  September  27,  1915, 
as  the  result  of  injuries  received  in  an  automobile  accident. 


136  YALE  COLLEGE 

His  ashes  were  buried  in  Chippianock  Cemetery  at  Rock 
Island,  In  his  memory,  there  has  been  estabUshed  at  Yale 
a  fund  of  $20,000,  the  income  of  which  is  to  be  used  for 
the  care  and  beautifying  of  the  College  Campus  and  of 
the  surrounding  streets. 

At  the  time  of  his  death,  he  was  president  of  the  United 
Charities  of  Chicago,  having  been  elected  to  that  office  in 
April,  1915.    He  was  unmarried. 


Fred  Sylvester  Tyler,  B.A.  1895 

Born  June  15,  1868,  in  Hammonton,  N.  J. 
Died  March  15,  1916,  in  Framingham,  Mass. 

Fred  Sylvester  Tyler  was  born  June  15,  1868,  in  Ham- 
monton, N.  J.,  where  his  father,  Samuel  H.  Tyler,  a 
farmer,  served  as  a  trustee  of  the  public  schools  for  some 
years.  His  mother  was  Elizabeth  A.,  daughter  of  Charles 
A.  Sylvester.  He  was  fitted  for  college  at  Phillips  Acad- 
emy, Exeter,  N.  H.,  and  in  Junior  and  Senior  years  at  Yale 
received  Colloquy  appointments. 

He  spent  the  first  year  after  his  graduation  at  the  Har- 
vard Medical  School,  holding  at  this  time  the  David 
Williams  Cheever  Scholarship.  He  was  obliged  to  give  up 
his  course  there  in  1896,  but  eight  years  later,  after  being 
engaged  in  various  lines  of  work  in  Massachusetts, 
returned  to  Harvard,  and  spent  two  additional  years  in  the 
study  of  medicine.  Since  that  time,  Mr.  Tyler  had  given 
his  attention  to  the  stock  market  at  Boston,  making  his 
home  in  Roxbury. 

He  died  in  Framingham,  Mass.,  March  15,  1916,  after  an 
illness  of  a  year  due  to  an  apoplectic  shock  and  Bright's 
disease,  and  was  buried  in  Pine  Grove  Cemetery  at 
Westboro,  Mass. 

Mr.  Tyler  was  not  married.  His  cousin,  Walter  Alden 
Barrows,  graduated  from  the  College  in  1891.  He  is 
survived  by  two  brothers  and  a  sister. 


1895-1896  137 


Estey  Fuller  Dayton,  B.A.   1896 

Born  March  7,  1873,  in  Torrington,  Conn. 
Died  December  13,  191S,  in  New  York  City 

Estey  Fuller  Dayton,  one  of  the  four  children  of  Arvid 
Dayton,  an  organ  builder  and  inventor,  and  Urania  Hannah 
(Marsh)  Dayton,  was  born  in  Torrington,  Conn.,  March  7, 
1873.  The  first  of  the  Dayton  family  to  emigrate  to  this 
country  settled  in  Southampton,  Long  Island,  in  1639,  com- 
ing from  England.  His  father  was  the  son  of  Jonah  and 
Mary  Policy  (Flint)  Dayton.  His  mother's  parents  were 
Riverius  Chauncy  and  Eunice  (Camp)  Marsh.  Her  earliest 
American  ancestors  came  from  England  in  the  seventeenth 
century. 

He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  the  Torrington  High  School, 
and  in  college  was  vice  president  of  the  Yale  Chess  Club, 
and  received  a  First  Colloquy  appointment  and  two-year 
honors  in  philosophy  at  Commencement. 

Mr.  Dayton  had  planned  to  continue  his  studies  at  Yale 
after  taking  his  Bachelor's  degree,  but  an  attack  of  typhoid 
fever  which  kept  him  at  his  home  in  Torrington  for  many 
months  following  his  graduation  caused  him  to  abandon  the 
idea.  In  the  spring  of  1897,  he  took  a  position  as  an  archi- 
tectural draftsman  with  the  firm  of  Ackerman  &  Ross  in 
New  York  City,  where  he  had  since  made  his  home.  In 
1899,  he  became  a  teacher  in  one  of  the  city  public  schools, 
but  in  January,  1900,  resigned  to  enter  the  New  York 
office  of  the  Fred  Macey  Company,  manufacturers  of  office 
and  library  furniture,  of  Grand  Rapids,  Mich.  About  six- 
teen months  later,  he  formed  a  connection  with  the  Library 
Bureau,  with  which  he  continued  until  January,  1907,  when 
he  was  made  assistant  manager  of  the  Wabash  Cabinet 
Company  of  New  York.  After  serving  in  that  capacity  for 
two  years,  he  opened  a  business  of  his  own, — the  Dayton 
Manufacturing  Company  (the  name  wa-s  afterwards 
changed  to  the  Dayton  Index  &  Manufacturing  Com- 
pany),— and  had  since  been  interested  in  the  manufacture 
of  business  systems  and  equipment.  In  1913,  Mr.  Dayton 
patented  a  card  index  system  known  as  "Visindex,"  which 
was  put  into  use  by  many  concerns  in  New  York  and  else- 
where, and  is  now  being  handled  by  the  Library  Bureau, 


138  YALE    COLLEGE 

and  shortly  before  his  death  he  perfected  another  form  of 
card  index. 

He  died  in  St.  Luke's  Hospital,  New  York,  December 
13,  1915,  after  a  brief  illness  from  pneumonia,  and  was 
buried  in  Hillside  Cemetery  at  Torrington. 

On  December  30,  1900,  Mr.  Dayton  was  married  in  New 
York  City  to  Lucie  Pinckney,  daughter  of  William  Benja- 
min and  Charlotte  Ellen  (Pinckney)  Lodge.  She  sur- 
vives him  with  six  children :  Cedric  Lodge ;  Helen  Marsh  ; 
Urania  Bartlett;  Laura  Pendleton;  Alfred  Camp,  and 
Esther  Latimer.  Their  second  son,  Malcolm  Pinckney, 
died  on  December  19,  1908. 


Carlos  Clayton  Heard,  B.A.   1896 

Born  July  5,  1875,  in  Biddeford,  Maine 
Died  January  31,  1915,  in  Biddeford,  Maine 

Carlos  Clayton  Heard  was  born  July  5,  1875,  in  Bidde- 
ford, Maine,  the  son  of  Carlos  Heard,  a  merchant,  who  has 
taken  a  prominent  part  in  the  affairs  of  that  city,  having 
been  an  alderman  in  1868,  representative  in  the  Legislature 
of  1879-80,  street  commissioner  from  1887  to  1889,  mayor 
in  1896  and  1897,  and  city  treasurer  during  1898-99.  His 
earliest  American  ancestor  on  the  side  of  his  father,  whose 
parents  were  James  and  Eunice  (McKenney)  Heard,  was 
John  Heard,  who  came  from  England  in  1636  and  settled 
in  what  is  now  Dover,  N.  H.  His  mother  was  Harriet 
Alberta,  daughter  of  Cyrus  K.  and  Harriet  (Graves)  Lunt. 

The  first  two  years  after  his  graduation  from  Yale,  which 
he  had  entered  from  the  Biddeford  High  School,  were 
spent  in  the  wholesale  and  retail  hardware  business  in  his 
native  town.  In  1898,  he  took  up  the  study  of  law  with 
Nathaniel  B.  Walker  (LL.B.  1877),  and  was  admitted  to 
the  bar  three  years  later.  He  was  for  a  long  time  associated 
with  Mr.  Walker  in  practice,  under  the  name  of  Heard  & 
Walker,  biit  for  several  years  had  practiced  independently. 
He  was  counsel  for  the  Biddeford  Savings  Bank,  of  which 
his  father  is  president,  and  local  counsel  for  several  large 
companies.  He  belonged  to  the  York  County  Bar  Asso- 
ciation, and  received  the  degree  of  LL.M.  from  the  Uni- 
versity of  Maine  in   1908.     In   1914,  he  was  elected  city 


I 


1896  139 

solicitor  of -Biddeford  on  the  Democratic  ticket,  and  held 
that  office  until  his  death.  He  served  for  nearly  sixteen 
years,  beginning  March,  1899,  as  a  member  of  the  Board 
of  Assessors  of  Taxes,  for  ten  years  being  chairman  of  the 
board.  In  1900,  he  was  chosen  secretary  of  the  Citizens' 
Executive  Committee,  and  served  in  that  capacity  for  a 
year.  He  v^^as  prominent  in  Masonry,  was  president  of  the 
Association  of  the  Descendants  of  John  Heard,  and 
attended  the  Foss  Street  Methodist  Church  of  Biddeford. 

His  death  occurred  at  his  home  in  that  city,  January  31, 
191 5,  afte^  an  illness  of  five  months  due  to  lung  trouble 
and  complications.  He  was  buried  in  Laurel  Hill  Cemetery 
at  Saco,  Maine. 

He  was  married  in  Biddeford,  July  15,  1903,  to  Mrs. 
Isabella  Falconer  (Paterson)  Bardsley  of  Saco,  daughter 
of  George  F.  and  Jeannette  MacGregor  Paterson  and  widow 
of  William  T.  Bardsley.  They  had  no  children.  Mr.  Heard 
is  survived  by  his  father,  his  widow,  and  two  sisters. 


John  Chamberlain  HolHster,  B.A.  1896 

Born  March  27,  1873,  in  Grand  Rapids,  Mich. 
Died  May  6,   1916,  in   Pasadena,  Gal. 

John  Chamberlain  HolHster,  son  of  Harvey  James  and 
Martha  (Clay)  HolHster,  was  born  in  Grand  Rapids,  Mich., 
March  27,  1873.  His  father,  who  for  a  number  of  years 
was  connected  with  the  First  National  Bank  of  Grand 
Rapids,  was  the  son  of  John  Bentley  and  Mary  (Chamber- 
lain) HolHster.  In  1642,  members  of  the  family  came  from 
Glastonbury,  England,  and  settled  in  Wethersfield,  Conn. 
His  mother's  parents  were  George  and  Sarah  B.  (Goodhue) 
Clay. 

He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  the  Boston  (Mass.)  Latin 
School,  and  in  college  sang  on  the  Freshman  Glee  Club  and 
on  the  Apollo  Glee  and  Banjo  Club,  was  treasurer  of  the 
Y.  M.  C.  A.  in  Senior  year,  and  received  Dispute 
appointments. 

He  had  chosen  medicine  as  his  life  work,  and  after  his 
graduation  from  Yale  began  his  preparation  at  North- 
western University,  taking  his  medical  degree  there  in  1900. 
He  then  spent  an  interneship  of  two  years  in  St.  Luke's 


14°  YALE    COLLEGE 

Hospital,  Chicago,  111.,  and  afterwards  traveled  in  Japan 
and  China.  On  his  return  to  Chicago,  he  became  assistant 
to  Lewis  L.  McArthur  (M.D.  Rush  Medical  College  1880), 
and  was  thereafter  engaged  in  surgical  work.  Individu- 
ally, and  in  collaboration  with  Dr.  McArthur,  he  published 
a  number  of  articles  showing  the  results  of  experiments 
made  by  them  in  the  direction  of  opsonins  and  the  value  of 
vaccines  in  surgery.  He  served  as  an  associate  surgeon  at 
St.  Luke's  Hospital,  and  taught  in  the  Medical  School  of 
Northwestern  University  during  this  period.  He  went  to 
Europe  in  1906,  and  studied  for  several  months  in  Berlin 
and  London.  In  1909,  he  began  an  independent  practice  in 
Chicago,  but  soon  afterwards  his  health  broke  down,  largely 
through  overwork,  and  he  went  to  California,  where  the 
remainder  of  his  life  was  spent.  In  December,  1910,  after 
a  period  of  rest  in  Pasadena,  he  established  offices  in  Los 
Angeles,  and  became  an  instructor  in  the  Medical  School 
of  the  University  of  Southern  California,  also  having 
charge  of  a  gynecological  dispensary  and  a  college  clinic 
at  the  County  Hospital. 

Early  in  19 14,  he  became  associated  with  a  Dr.  McBride 
as  a  specialist  in  medical  gynecology  and  andrology.  His 
health  completely  failed  not  long  afterwards,  and  he  died 
May  6,  1916,  at  his  home  in  Pasadena,  following  an  attack 
of  pneumonia. 

Dr.  Hollister  was  married  in  St.  Paul,  Minn.,  May  17, 
1902,  to  Jane,  daughter  of  Capt.  Edgar  Campbell  Bowen, 
U.  S.  A.,  now  retired,  and  Minerva  Lydia  (Simpson) 
Bowen,  who  survives  him  with  their  two  children :  Isabel 
and  John  Chamberlain,  Jr.  A  brother,  George  Clay  Hol- 
lister, was  also  a  member  of  the  Class  of  1896,  and  another 
brother,  Clay  Harvey  Hollister,  graduated  from  Amherst  in 
1886. 


Clarence  Winter,  B.A.   1897 

Born  February  19,  1874,  in  Columbus,  Ind. 
Died  December  14,  1915,  in  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

Clarence  Winter,  son  of  Ferdinand  and  Mary  (Keyes) 
Winter,  was  born  in  Columbus,  Ind.,  February  19,  1874. 
His  father  was  the  son  of  Charles  H.  and  Elizabeth  (Cobb) 


1896-1898  141 

Winter  and  a  descendent  of  Samuel  C.  West.  His  maternal 
grandfather  was  John  Lane  Keyes.  He  was  fitted  for  col- 
lege at  the  Boys'  Classical  School  in  Indianapolis,  Ind.,  and 
at  Phillips  Academy,  Andover,  Mass.  He  entered  Yale  in 
1893,  and  received  a  Second  Colloquy  appointment  at 
Commencement. 

After  graduation,  he  took  up  the  study  of  law  with  his 
father  in  Indianapolis,  and,  being  admitted  to  the  bar  in 
1898,  practiced  in  partnership  with  him  until  1902.  He 
moved  to  New  York  City  in  that  year,  and  had  since  been 
associated  with  his  brother,  Keyes  Winter  (B.A.  1900),  as 
a  member  of  the  law  firm  of  Winter  &  Winter. 

Mr.  Winter  died  by  his  own  hand,  December  14,  1915,  in 
Philadelphia,  Pa.,  where  he  had  gone  on  a  business  trip. 
His  body  was  taken  to  Indianapolis  for  burial  in  Crown 
Hill  Cemetery. 

He  was  married  in  that  city,  November  21,  1900,  to 
Margaret,  daughter  of  Jason  and  Ada  (Smith)  Carey. 
She  survives  him  with  their  two  children,  Margaret  Carey 
and  Ferdinand,  2d. 


Jacob  Burnet  Burnet,  B.A.  1898 

Born  November  10,  1876,  in  Cincinnati,  Ohio 
Died  June  4,  1915,  in  New  York  City- 
Jacob  Burnet  Burnet  was  born  in  Cincinnati,  Ohio, 
November  10,  1876.  His  father,  Jacob  Staats  Burnet, 
graduated  from  Yale  College  in  1857,  and,  after  studying 
in  the  Cincinnati  Law  School,  practiced  his  profession  in 
Cincinnati  for  many  years ;  he  was  the  son  of  Robert  Wal- 
lace and  Margaret  (Groesbeck)  Burnet,  the  grandson  of 
Jacob  Burnet,  a  United  States  senator  and  justice  of  the 
Supreme  Court  of  Ohio,  and  the  great-grandson  of  William 
Burnet,  surgeon  general  of  the  Continental  Army  in  the 
Revolution  and  an  original  member  of  the  Order  of  the 
Cincinnati.  Jacob  B.  Burnet's  mother  was  Annie,  daughter 
of  William  and  Mary  (Payne)  Stubbs  of  Chester,  England. 
He  was  fitted  for  college  at  the  Franklin  School  in  Cin- 
cinnati, and  in  Sophomore  year  at  Yale  was  a  member  of 
the  Gymnastic  Team.     He  was  given  a  Colloquy  appoint- 


142  YALE   COLLEGE 

ment  in  Junior  year  and  at  Commencement,  receiving  also 
one-year  honors  in  political  science  and  law. 

In  1901,  after  three  years  of  study,  Mr.  Burnet  was 
graduated  from  the  Harvard  Law  School  with  the  degree 
of  LL.B.  He  was  admitted  to  the  New  York  Bar  in  the 
spring  of  1902,  and  until  1905  was  in  the  law  office  of 
Dittenhoefer,  Gerber  &  James  of  New  York  City.  From 
that  time  until  his  death,  he  conducted  an  independent  prac- 
tice in  New  York.  He  was  a  member  of  Mount  Auburn 
Church  (Presbyterian)  of  Cincinnati. 

He  died  June  4,  191 5,  in  New  York  City,  and  was  buried 
in  River  Bend  Cemetery  at  Watch  Hill,  R.  I. 

Mr.  Burnet  was  unmarried.  Surviving  him  are  two 
brothers,  Robert  Wallace  (B.A.  1897)  and  Harold,  a  gradu- 
ate of  Harvard  in  1902,  and  two  sisters,  one  of  whom  is  the 
wife  of  Dudley  Phelps  (B.A.  1883,  LL.B.  Columbia  1885). 


Henry  Baldwin  Cogswell,  B.A.  1898 

Born  January  11,  1877,  in  Windsor,  Conn. 
Died  July  28,   1915,  in   Bridgeport,   Conn. 

Henry  Baldwin  Cogswell  was  born  in  Windsor,  Conn., 
January  11,  1877,  the  son  of  Richard  Baldwin  and  Lucy 
Maria  (Alexander)  Cogswell.  His  father,  a  clerk  with  the 
New  York,  New  Haven  &  Hartford  Railroad  Company, 
was  the  son  of  Edwin  Lawrence  and  Sarah  Clark  (Law- 
rence) Cogswell  and  a  descendant  of  John  Cogswell,  who 
came  to  America  from  England  in  1635  and  settled  at 
Ipswich,  Mass.  Through  his  mother,  whose  parents  were 
Henry  and  Clarissa  Maria  (Breckenridge)  Alexander,  he 
was  descended  from  Samuel  Alexander,  who  was  living  in 
Stoughton,  Mass.,  as  early  as  1732.  His  Revolutionary 
ancestors  included  Benjamin  Cogswell,  Josiah  Lawrence, 
and  Samuel  Patchin. 

He  was  fitted  for  college  at  the  high  school  in  Bridgeport, 
Conn.,  to  which  place  his  family  had  moved  in  1880,  and  in 
Junior  year  at  Yale  received  a  Dissertation  appointment, 
obtaining  a  First  Dispute  at  Commencement. 

Mr.  Cogswell  spent  the  first  year  after  graduation  as  a 
clerk  in  the  employ  of  the  American  Graphophone  Company 
of  Bridgeport,  in  1899  becoming  a  traveling  salesman  for 


1898-1899  M3 

R.  G.  Dun  &  Company.  At  first,  he  made  his  headquarters 
in  Worcester,  and  afterwards  in  Boston,  his  territory  being 
Massachusetts,  New  Hampshire,  and  Vermont. 

In  January,  1912,  his  health  failed,  and  from  that  time 
he  was  unable  to  engage  in  any  business.  The  remainder 
of  his  life  was  spent  in  Bridgeport  and  Boston.  He  died 
in  Bridgeport,  July  28,  1915,  the  immediate  cause  of  his 
death  being  an  abscess  of  the  lung.  Burial  was  in  Moun- 
tain Grove  Cemetery  in  that  city. 

Mr.  Cogswell  was  married  May  4,  1909,  in  Allston, 
Mass.,  to  Freda  Louise,  daughter  of  Fred  Howard  Stone. 
They  had  no  children.  Besides  his  wife,  he  is  survived  by 
his  father,  a  brother,  and  a  sister. 


Horace  Byron  Warner,  B.A.  1899 

Born  March  24,   1876,  in  Penfield,  N.  Y. 
Died  October  21,  1915,  in  Rochester,  N.  Y. 

Horace  Byron  Warner  was  the  son  of  Henry  Warner,  a 
farmer  and  fruit  grower  of  Penfield,  N.  Y.,  and  Maria 
Lucy  (Strowger)  Warner,  and  was  born  in  Penfield,  March 
24,  1876.  He  received  his  early  education  in  the  schools  of 
the  neighboring  town  of  Fairport,  and  in  1895  entered  Yale. 
He  received  Colloquy  scholarship  appointments  in  Junior 
year  and  at  Commencement. 

In  the  fall  after  his  graduation  from  the  College,  he 
returned  to  New  Haven  to  take  up  the  study  of  law,  but 
the  death  of  his  brother  called  him  home  in  a  short  time, 
and  soon  afterwards  he  went  to  Newton,  111.,  to  look  after 
the  fruit  evaporating  business  in  which  his  brother  had  been 
engaged.  Early  in  1901,  he  resumed  the  study  of  law  in 
the  office  of  John  VanVoorhis  &  Sons  in  Rochester,  N.  Y. 
In  April,  1905,  he  became  managing  clerk  for  the  law  firm 
of  Barhite  &  Bly  in  that  city,  two  months  later  being 
admitted  to  the  New  York  Bar.  In  February,  1907,  he 
opened  an  office  in  Rochester  for  the  general  practice  of 
the  law,  but  after  about  two  months  he  was  compelled  by 
illness  to  give  up  his  practice  until  the  following  year.  In 
1903,  he  was  appointed  justice  of  the  peace  of  the  town  of 
Penfield,  in  1904  being  elected  for  a  term  of  two  years,  and 
in  1913  he  was  elected  to  the  New  York  Assembly  from 


144  YALE  COLLEGE 

Monroe  County  on  the  Progressive  ticket.  The  next  year 
he  was  defeated  for  reelection.  Mr.  Warner  had  been  an 
officer  in  several  fraternal  organizations.  He  attended  the 
Methodist  Church,  but  was  not  a  member. 

His  death,  which  was  due  to  septic  poisoning,  occurred 
October  21,  1915,  in  Rochester.  His  body  was  taken  to 
Penfield  for  burial  in  Oakland  Cemetery. 

Mr.  Warner  was  not  married.  He  is  survived  by  his 
parents  and  two  sisters,  all  of  whom  live  in  Penfield.  His 
cousin,  Irving  H.  Warner,  graduated  from  Yale  with  the 
degree  of  B.A.  in  1903. 


Albert  Norton  Butler,  B.A.  1900 

Born  April  7,  1877,  in  Berlin,  Conn. 
Died  September  28,  1915,  in  Monterey,  Mass, 

Albert  Norton  Butler  was  born  on  April  7,  1877,  in 
Berlin,  Conn.,  the  son  of  Edwin  Howell  Butler,  a  farmer, 
and  Harriet  Isabel  (Norton)  Butler.  His  preparation  for 
college  was  received  in  the  schools  of  Meriden,  Conn., 
and  at  the  Hillhouse  High  School  in  New  Haven.  He 
entered  Yale  with  the  College  Class  of  1899,  but  left  in 
Freshman  year  on  account  of  illness,  joining  the  Class  with 
which  he  took  his  degree  the  next  fall.  He  was  a  member 
of  the  Track  Team,  being  one  of  the  last  men  to  win  his 
Y  in  the  mile  walk,  and  received  Oration  appointments  in 
Junior  and  Senior  years. 

For  a  few  months  after  graduation,  he  worked  for  the 
New  Haven  Dairy  Company,  but  in  the  fall  of  1900 
returned  to  Meriden,  where  he  had  since  been  engaged  in 
the  lumber  and  real  estate  business,  and  in  farming.  At 
the  time  of  his  death,  he  was  head  of  the  Butler  &  Klein 
Company,  real  estate  dealers.  He  was  active  in  various 
movements  for  the  public  welfare,  and  belonged  to  the  First 
Congregational  Church  of  Meriden. 

On  September  28,  191 5,  Mr.  Butler  was  drowned  in  Lake 
.Garfield  at  Monterey,  Mass.  He  had  started  alone  to  row- 
across  the  lake,  and,  being  heavily  clothed,  was  unable  to 
cope  with  the  heavy  wind  and  thick  weeds,  and  was  thrown 
into  the  water.  Burial  was  in  Walnut  Grove  Cemetery  in 
Meriden. 


1899-1900  ^45 

He  was  married  in  Waterbury,  Conn.,  May  20,  1903,  to 
Amy  Louise,  daughter  of  Jay  Hiscox  and  Bertha  (Piatt) 
Hart.  Mrs.  Butler  survives  her  husband  without  children. 
His  brother,  Joel  Ives  Butler,  graduated  from  the  Sheffield 
Scientific  School  in  1897  and  from  the  Johns  Hopkins 
Medical  School  in  1901.  An  account  of  the  Hfe  of  his 
half-brother,  George  Eli  Butler  (B.A.  1895),  appears  else- 
where in  this  volume.  Mr.  Butler  was  a  cousin  of  Eli  Ives 
Butler  (B.A.  1898)  and  a  brother-in-law  of  Walter  E. 
Crittenden  (B.A.  1900). 


•  Norman  Geor,^e  Conner,  B.A.  1900 

Born  December  18,  1879,  in  West  Bradford  Township,  Pa. 
Died  March  24,   1916,   in  San  Francisco,  Cal. 

Norman  George  Conner,  son  of  Hayes  Conner,  a  farmer, 
whose  parents  were  Banner  and  Katharine  (McCorkle) 
Conner,  was  born  in  West  Bradford  Township,  Pa.,  Decem- 
ber 18,  1879.  His  mother  was  Elizabeth  Benner,  daughter 
of  Aquila  and  Jeannette  (Benner)  Thomas  and  sister  of 
Isaac  Thomas,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1881.  Her 
ancestors  came  from  Wales  to  America  in  the  latter  part 
of  the  seventeenth  century,  and  settled  in  Queen  Anne 
County,  Maryland.  His  maternal  uncle,  Leonard  R. 
Thomas,  was  a  member  of  the  Ninety-seventh  Regiment, 
Pennsylvania  Volunteers,  from  September,  1861,  until 
August,  1865,  being  mustered  out  of  service  as  a  brevet 
major. 

His  preparation  for  Yale,  which  he  entered  in  1896,  was 
received  in  the  public  schools  of  Marshallton,  Pa.,  and  at  the 
Hillhouse  High  School  in  New  Haven.  He  received  Ora- 
tion appointments  in  Junior  year  and  at  Commencement. 
During  the  Spanish  War,  he  served  with  the  First  Regiment, 
Connecticut  National  Guard. 

He  spent  about  a  year  at  home  after  leaving  college, 
engaged  in  farming,  but  left  this  country  in  the  early  fall  of 
1901  to  enter  the  service  of  the  Philippine  Government  as 
a  teacher  in  the  Bureau  of  Education.  He  taught  English 
for  one  or  two  years,  and  then  served  as  a  supervisor  of 
teachers  in  various  places  until  June,  1904,  when  he  was 
promoted  to  a  division  superintendency  and  assigned  to  the 


146  YALI-:    COLLEGE 

province  of  Nueva  Vizcaya  on  the  island  of  Luzon.  He 
was  later  made  acting  governor  of  that  province.  In  1910, 
he  was  appointed  lieutenant  governor  of  the  sub-province 
of  Apayao,  Northern  District  of  the  Philippine  Islands,  and 
served  in  that  capacity  until  the  summer  of  191 5,  when  he 
suffered  a  severe  attack  of  pyaemia.  When  his  condition 
had  somewhat  improved,  he  was  sent  home  on  sick  leave. 
On  reaching  San  Francisco  in  October,  he  had  a  relapse, 
and  died  in  the  Letterman  General  Hospital  in  that  city, 
March  24,  19 16.  Burial  was  in  Bradford  Cemetery  at 
Marshallton. 

Before  he  left  the  Philippines,  Mr.  Conner  had  brought 
peace  conditions  to  such  a  point  in  the  province  of  Apayao 
that  they  now  compare  favorably  with  those  obtaining  in 
any  part  of  the  Islands.  Almost  single-handed,  he  intro- 
duced order  into  a  very  wild  and  disturbed  province,  and 
did  much  in  the  way  of  introducing  civilization  among  the 
mountain  people  and  promoting  their  welfare. 

Mr.  Conner,  who  was  unmarried,  is  survived  by  a  sister 
and  three  brothers,  one  of  whom  served  in  Company  T, 
vSixth  Regiment,  National  Guard  of  Pennsylvania,  in  the 
Spanish-American  War.  A  cousin,  Walter  Scott  Thomas, 
graduated  from  the  Sheffield  Scientific  School  in  1899. 


William  fivarts  Tracy,  B.A.   1900 

Born  September  24,  1878,  in  Plainfield,  N.  J. 
Died  February  19,  1916,  in  Helena,  Mont. 

William  Evarts  Tracy  was  born  September  24,  1878,  in 
Plainfield,  N.  J.,  the  son  of  Jeremiah  Evarts  Tracy,  a 
retired  lawyer,  who  received  the  degree  of  LL.B.  at  Yale 
in  1857.  Mr.  Tracy  served  for  two  terms  as  president  of 
the  Plainfield  Common  Council  and  for  twenty-five  years 
as  a  director  of  the  Plainfield  Public  Library.  He  is  a 
descendant  of  Stephen  Tracy,  who  in  1663  came  to  Plym- 
outh from  England,  later  moving  to  Duxbury,  Mass.,  and 
the  son  of  Ebenezer  Carter  Tracy  (B.A.  Dartmouth  1819, 
Andover  Theological  Seminary  1822)  and  Martha  Sherman 
(Evarts)  Tracy.  The  latter's  parents  were  Jeremiah  Evarts 
(B.A.  1802)  and  Mehitabel,  daughter  of  Roger  Sherman, 


I 


1900  147 

treasurer  of  Yale  College  from  1765  to  1776,  a  signer  of 
the  Declaration  of  Independence,  and  a  member  of  the 
Continental  Congress.  William  Evarts  Tracy's  mother  was 
Martha  Sherman,  daughter  of  Rev.  David  Greene  (B.A. 
1821,  Andover  Theological  Seminary  1826)  and  Maty 
(Evarts)  Greene,  the  latter  being  the  eldest  daughter  of 
Jeremiah  Evarts,  whose  mother  was  the  daughter  of  Timo- 
thy Todd  (B.A.  1747)  and  whose  sons,  John  Jay  Evarts  and 
William  Maxwell  Evarts,  graduated  from  the  College  in 
1832  and  1837,  respectively. 

Preparing  for  college  at  Leal's  School  for  Boys  in  Plain- 
field,  he  entered  Yale  in  1896.  He  divided  the  prize  for 
the  best  examination  for  admission  of  candidates  from 
Plainfield,  and  in  both  Junior  and  Senior  years  was  given 
Dispute  appointments. 

In  1904,  he  received  the  degree  of  E.M.  from  Columbia 
University,  and  was  then  for  about  ten  years  connected  with 
the  Liberty  Bell  Mining  Company  of  Telluride,  Colo.  His 
death  occurred  suddenly  February  19,  19 16,  in  Helena, 
Mont.,  where  he  had  gone  two  weeks  before  to  take  a 
position  with  the  Anaconda  Copper  Company. 

Mr.  Tracy  was  not  married.  Besides  his  father,  he  is 
survived  by  five  sisters  and  two  brothers, — Howard  Crosby 
(B.A.  1887,  LL.B.  Columbia  1889)  and  Evarts,  who  grad- 
uated from  the  College  in  1890.  Another  brother,  Robert 
Storer,  who  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  at  Yale  in  1893 
and  that  of  M.D.  at  the  College  of  Physicians  and  Surgeons 
in  1896,  was  drowned  at  Saranac  Lake  in  1899.  Mr.  Tracy 
was  a  nephew  of  Dr.  Roger  Sherman  Tracy,  who  graduated 
from  the  College  in  1862  and  from  the  College  of  Physi- 
cians and  Surgeons  at  Columbia  in  1868,  and  of  Jeremiah 
Evarts  Greene  (B.A.  1853)  and  a  second  cousin  of  Charles 
Butler  Evarts,  a  non-graduate  member  of  the  Class  of  1866; 
Allen  W.  Evarts  (B.A.  1869)  ;  Sherman  Evarts,  who 
received  his  B.A.  at  Yale  in  1881,  and  of  Maxwell  Evarts, 
a  graduate  of  Yale  in  the  College  Class  of  1884. 


148  YALE    COLLEGE 


Harold  Chappell,  B.A.   1901 

Born  September  27,  1879,  in  New  London,  Conn. 
Died  September  30,  1915,  in  Sierra  Madre,  Cal. 

Harold  Chappell  was  born  in  New  London,  Conn.,  Sep- 
tember 27,  1879,  being  one  of  the  seven  children  of  Frank 
Huntington  Chappell,  president  of  the  Thames  Tow  Boat 
Company  of  that  city,  and  Catherine  Gertrude  (Bishop) 
Chappell.  His  great-great-grandfather  was  Gen.  Jedediah 
Hutington,  who  served  as  aide-de-camp  to  Washington  dur- 
ing the  War  of  the  Revolution.  He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at 
the  Bulkeley  School  in  New  London,  and  in  college  served 
on  the  Junior  Promenade  Committee,  and  played  on  the 
University  Banjo  and  Mandolin  Clubs  in  his  Junior  and 
Senior  years. 

Not  long  after  his  graduation,  he  entered  the  employ  of 
the  Thames  Tow  Boat  Company,  of  which  in  1902  he  became 
superintendent.  In  1904,  it  was  found  that  he  had  devel- 
oped tuberculosis,  and  in  April  of  that  year  he  was  forced 
to  go  West.  For  about  two  years,  he  cared  for  his  health, 
and  in  the  spring  of  1906  he  returned  to  New  London, 
being  for  a  time  in  the  office  of  his  father's  firm.  The  fol- 
lowing February,  Mr.  Chappell  was  again  compelled  to 
seek  a  more  favorable  climate,  and  since  then  he  had  lived 
in  the  West.  He  worked*  for  the  Colorado  Automobile 
Company  in  Denver  for  a  while  and  later  for  Mr.  F.  W. 
Berger,  the  superintendent  of  an  ore  mine.  Since  1912,  he 
had  been  in  California,  and  he  died  at  Sierra  Madre,  that 
state,  September  30,  19 15.  His  body  was  brought  to  New 
London,  and  buried  in  Cedar  Grove  Cemetery. 

He  served  as  Secretary  of  the  Class  of  1901  for  a  time 
after  graduation.  He  belonged  to  St.  James'  Protestant 
Episcopal  Church  of  New  London.  He  was  not  married. 
One  of  his  brothers,  Donald  Chappell,  graduated  from  the 
College  in  1900,  and  Frank  V.  Chappell  (Ph.B.  1898)  and 
George  S.  Chappell  (B.A.  1899)  are  cousins.  A  sister  is 
the  wife  of  Carl  R.  Schultz  (Ph.B.  1897). 


1901-1903  149 


Barton  Talcott  Doudg-e,  B.A.  1901 

Born  September  20,  1879,  in  New  York  City 
Died  February  24,  1916,  in  New  York  City 

It  has  been  impossible  to  secure  the  desired  information 
for  an  obituary  sketch  of  Mr.  Doudge  in  time  for  publica- 
tion in  this  volume.  A  sketch  will  appear  in  a  subsequent 
issue  of  the  Obituary  Record. 


Henry  Sayrs  McAuley,  B.A.  1901 

Born  November  20,  1879,  in  Chicago,  111. 
Died  June,   1916,   in   Missoula,   Mont. 

It  has  been  impossible  to  secure  the  desired  information 
for  an  obituary  sketch  of  Mr.  McAuley  in  time  for  publica- 
tion in  this  volume.  A  sketch  will  appear  in  a  subsequent 
issue  of  the  Obituary  Record. 


Charles  Hitchcock,  Jr.,  B.A.  1903 

Born  August  25,  1881,  at  Narragansett  Pier,  R.  I. 
Died  February  17,  1916,  in  New  York  City 

Charles  Hitchcock,  Jr.,  was  born  August  25,  i88r,  at 
Narragansett  Pier,  R.  I.,  the  son  of  Charles  Hitchcock 
(Ph.B.  Brown  1869,  M.D.  Columbia  1872),  now  a  prac- 
ticing physician  in  New  York  City.  He  was  a  descendant 
of  Matthias  Hitchcock,  who  came  to  this  country  from 
England  in  1635,  settling  at  New  Haven,  Conn.,  four  years 
later,  and  the  grandson  of  Charles  and  Olivia  George 
(Cowell)  Hitchcock.  Judge  Samuel  J.  Hitchcock,  his 
great-grandfather,  graduated  from  the  College  in  1809, 
receiving  the  degree  of  LL.D.  in  1842;   he  was  one  of  the 


150  YALE   COLLEGE 

founders  of  the  Yale  School  of  Law.  The  mother  of 
Charles  Hitchcock,  Jr.,  was  Frances,  daughter  of  David 
and  Anna  (Welsh)  Lapsley.  Through  her,  he  was 
descended  from  David  Lapsley,  who  came  to  America  from 
Ireland  in  1750  and  settled  in  Pennsylvania.  Another 
ancestor  was  David  Howell  (B.A.  Princeton  1766),  who 
was  given  honorary  degrees  by  Yale,  Princeton,  and  Brown. 
He  was  a  professor  in  the  latter  institution,  a  member  of 
the  Continental  Congress,  and  a  judge  of  the  Supreme 
Court  and  of  the  United  States  District  Court  of  Rhode 
Island. 

Charles  Hitchcock,  Jr.,  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  the  Pom- 
fret  (Conn.)  School.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Freshman 
Football  Team  until  disabled,  and  throughout  his  college 
course  was  a  member  of  the  University  Golf  Team,  captain- 
ing it  for  two  years.  He  won  his  Y,  was  the  University 
golf  champion  three  times  and  the  winner  of  the  Inter- 
collegiate Golf  Tournament  in  Junior  year.  He  played  on 
the  University  Hockey  Team  in  Junior  and  Senior  years, 
and  was  captain  in  1902-03.  His  Junior  appointment  was 
a  Second  Colloquy. 

On  graduating,  he  became  a  broker  in  New  York  City. 
His  first  connection  was  with  Lohrke,  Rosen  &  Company, 
but  in  1906  he  left  their  office,  and  went  on  the  curb.  In 
1907,  he  formed  the  firm  of  Hitchcock,  Cameron  &  Com- 
pany in  the  New  York  Curb  Association.  That  partner- 
ship being  dissolved  in  1909,  Mr.  Hitchcock  was  for  the 
next  five  years  a  partner  in  Pendergast,  Hale  &  Company, 
as  floor  member  of  the  New  York  Stock  Exchange.  From 
1914  until  his  death,  he  conducted  an  independent  brokerage 
business. 

Mr.  Hitchcock's  ability  as  an  amateur  golf-player  was 
recognized  throughout  the  country  by  his  success  in  many 
matches  on  Eastern  and  Middle  Western  links.  He  was  a 
member  of  the  Episcopal  Church. 

He  died  February  17,  1916,  at  his  home  in  New  York 
City,  after  a  brief  illness  from  pneumonia,  and  was  buried 
in  Woodlawn  Cemetery. 

He  was  married  in  February,  1909,  in  New  York  to  Mrs. 
Helena  Caroline  (Janssen)  Walker.  She  survives  him 
with  their  son,  Charles,  3d. 


1903-1904  151 

Bronson  Mills  Warren,  B.A.   1904 

Born  January  8,  1883,  in  Bridgeport,  Conn. 
Died  December  17,  1915,  in  Bridgeport,  Conn. 

Bronson  Mills  Warren,  son  of  Tracy  Bronson  and  Clara 
Arabella  (Mills)  Warren,  was  born  in  Bridgeport,  Conn., 
January  8,  1883.  His  father  was  the  son  of  David  Hard 
and  Louisa  (Bronson)  Warren  and  a  descendant  of  Richard 
Warren,  who  came  to  this  country  with  the  Mayflower 
company ;  he  is  at  present  an  insurance  agent  in  Bridgeport, 
where  he  served  as  alderman  during  1883  and  1884  and  as 
city  treasurer  in  1885.  His  mother's  parents  were  John 
FrankHn  and  Sarah  Rumsey  (Dudley)  Mills.  He  was 
fitted  for  Yale  at  the  Taft  School,  Watertown,  Conn,,  and 
in  college  was  a  member  of  the  Cross-Country  and  Track 
squads  in  Freshman  year  and  of  the  University  Football 
Squad  in  Junior  year.  He  received  High  Oration  appoint- 
ments and  an  election  to  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 

Two  months  after  graduation,  he  began  work  for  the 
International  Silver  Company  in  Bridgeport,  but  in  October 
left  them  to  enter  the  employ  of  the  American  Tube  & 
Stamping  Company.  The  following  April,  he  became  con- 
nected with  the  B.  D.  Pierce,  Jr.,  Company,  with  which  he 
continued  as  superintendent  until  June,  1906,  when  he 
accepted  a  similar  position  at  the  plant  of  the  Derby  Rubber 
Company  at  Derby,  Conn.  At  the  time  of  his  death,  he 
had  been  for  several  years  business  manager  of  the  Con- 
necticut Trap  Rock  Quarries,  Inc.,  of  New  Plaven.  He 
was  a  veteran  of  the  New  Haven  Grays,  and  belonged  to 
St.  John's  Protestant  Episcopal  Church  of  Bridgeport. 

Mr.  Warren's  death  occurred,  from  pneumonia,  after  an 
illness  of  only  four  days,  on  December  17,  1915,  at  his 
home  in  Bridgeport.  He  was  buried  in  Brooklawn  Cemetery 
in  that  city. 

He  was  married  in  Bridgeport,  April  20,  1909,  to  Pauline 
Benedict,  daughter  of  Edward  Wallace  and  Alice  Martha 
(Benedict)  Downs.  She  survives  him  with  their  two 
daughters,  Alice  Mills  and  Dorothy  Downs.  He  leaves 
also  his  father,  a  sister,  and  two  brothers,  John  Mills  (Ph.B. 
1896),  and  Harvey  Tracy,  who  graduated  from  the  College 
in  1910.  Charles  H.  Warren,  a  member  of  the  Sheffield 
Class  of  1896,  was  a  cousin. 


152  YALE   COLLEGE 


Thomas  Leonard  Shevlin,  B.A.   1906 

Born  March  i,  1883,  in  Muskegon,  Mich. 
Died  December  29,  191S,  in  Minneapolis,  Minn. 

Thomas  Leonard  Shevlin  was  born  in  Muskegon,  Mich., 
March  i,  1883,  the  son  of  Thomas  H.  Shevlin.  His  mother 
was  the  daughter  of  Stephen  C.  Hall.  He  was  fitted  for 
Yale  at  The  Hill  School  in  Pottstown,  Pa.,  and  in  the  first 
term  of  his  Freshman  year  made  a  first  division  stand.  He 
received  First  Colloquy  appointments  in  Junior  year  and  at 
Commencement.  In  Senior  year,  he  was  captain  of  the 
University  Football  Team,  of  which  he  had  been  a  member 
throughout  his  course.  While  a  Freshman,  he  played  on 
the  University  Baseball  Team,  and  he  was  a  member  of 
the  Track  Team  for  all  four  years,  winning  a  number  of 
events  in  the  hammer-throw  in  the  various  intercollegiate 
meets.     He  belonged  to  the  University  Club. 

After  a  year  spent  in  the  woods  of  the  Northwest  study- 
ing lumber  methods,  Mr.  Shevlin  went  into  the  office  of 
Shevlin,  Carpenter  &  Company  in  Minneapolis  as  his 
father's  assistant.  The  name  of  the  company  was  later 
changed  to  the  Shevlin,  Carpenter  &  Clarke  Company,  and 
of  this  company  he  became  secretary  in  1909.  He  was 
later  made  vice  president,  and  about  1912  succeeded  his 
father  as  head  of  his  various  lumber  interests  in  the  North- 
west, which  were  then  organized  under  the  name  of  the 
Shevlin  Company  as  a  holding  company  for  the  family. 
Among  the  companies  of  which  he  thus  became  president 
were  the  Shevlin-Hixon  Company  of  Bend,  Ore.,  the 
Crookston  Lumber  Company,  the  Tremont  Land  Company, 
the  Land,  Log  &  Lumber  Company,  the  Libby  Lumber 
Company,  the  Corona  Lumber  Company,  and  the  Fargo 
Lumber  Company.  He  was  a  director  in  the  First  & 
Security  National  Bank  of  Minneapolis. 

Twice  since  graduation — in  1910  and  1915 — Mr.  Shevlin 
returned  to  New  Haven  as  emergency  coach  to  reorganize 
the  Football  Team.  In  1910,  he  was  successful  in  making 
the  Team  the  winner  of  the  Yale-Harvard-Princeton  series, 
and  in  the  fall  of  191 5  succeeded  in  building  up  a  team 
which,  although  defeated  by  Harvard,  won  the  Princeton 
game.  Mr.  Shevlin  went  to  California  for  a  short  rest  at 
the  close  of  the  football  season  in  191 5,  and  shortly  after 


1906-1907  153 

returning  to  his  home  in  Minneapolis  was  taken  ill  with 
pneumonia,  from  which  he  died  on  December  29.  He  was 
buried  in  the  family  mausoleum  in  Lakewood  Cemetery  in 
Minneapolis.  A  small  volume  in  his  memory  has  been 
published  by  the  members  of  the  University  Football  Team 
of  1915  and  friends. 

He  was  married  February  i,  1909,  in  Louisville,  Ky.,  to 
Elizabeth  Brannin,  daughter  of  Brannin  and  Brite 
(McDonald)  Sherley,  who  survives  him  with  a  daughter, 
Elizabeth  Brite,  and  a  son,  Thomas  Henry.  One  of  his 
sisters  is  the  wife  of  David  D.  Tenney,  a  non-graduate 
member  of  the  College  Class  of  1900.  Mr.  Shevlin  was  a 
member  of  the  Roman  Catholic  Church. 


John  Elbert  Shirk,  B.A.   1907 

Born  February  17,  1884,  in  Tipton,  Ind. 
Died  December   10,  1915,  in  Chicago,  111. 

John  Elbert  Shirk,  son  of  Elbert  Hamilton  and  Nannie 
(Roberts)  Shirk,  was  born  in  Tipton,  Ind.,  February  17, 
1884.  He  received  his  preparatory  education  at  Worcester 
Academy,  and  spent  the  year  of  1902-03  at  the  University 
of  Michigan,  entering  Yale  as  a  Freshman  in  1903.  His 
scholarship  appointments  were  a  First  Colloquy  in  Junior 
year  and  a  First  Dispute  at  Commencement. 

Mr.  Shirk  returned  to  his  home  in  Tipton  upon  gradua- 
tion, and  took  up  the  business  interests  of  his  father,  who 
had  been  president  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Tipton, 
besides  holding  a  large  acreage  in  farm  lands.  He  was  for 
a  time  connected  with  the  First  National  Bank,  serving  as 
its  assistant  cashier  from  1909  to  191 1.  Since  that  time, 
he  had  given  his  attention  to  the  affairs  of  the  Royal  Can- 
ning Company  in  Tipton,  of  which  he  was  president  and 
owner.  He  did  a  great  deal  for  charity,  without  its  being 
publicly  known. 

Mr.  Shirk  died  December  10,  1915,  in  St.  Luke's  Hospital, 
Chicago,  111.,  where  he  had  gone  to  receive  treatment  for 
stomach  trouble.  A  few  days  before,  aii  operation  was 
performed  with  apparent  success,  but  a  sudden  relapse 
necessitating  a  second  operation  was  more  than  his  condi- 


154  YALE    COLLl'.CE 

tion  could  stand,  and  heart  failure  caused  his  death.    Inter- 
ment was  in  Crown  Hill  Cemetery,  Indianapolis. 

He  was  married  in  Richmond,  Ind.,  April  17,  191 2,  to 
Juliet  Robinson,  daughter  of  Samuel  Edward  and  Sue 
(Robinson)  Swayne.  She  survives  him,  as  do  his  mother 
and  a  sister. 


.    Charles  Patrick  McKiernan,  B.A.   1909 

Born  February  13,  1887,  in  Naiigatuck,  Conn. 
Died  May  28,  1916,  in  Chung-king,  China 

Charles  Patrick  McKiernan  was  born  February  13,  1887, 
in  Naugatuck,  Conn.,  the  son  of  Thomas  F.  McKiernan,  a 
policeman,  and  Bridget  (Braziel)  McKiernan.  His  pater- 
nal grandparents  were  Peter  McKiernan,  who  settled  in 
Connecticut  about  1840,  and  Elizabeth  (McLoughlin) 
McKiernan,  and  his  mother  was  the  daughter  of  Patrick 
and  Mary  Agnes  (Murray)  Braziel.  His  grand-uncle, 
Thomas  McKiernan,  and  two  cousins  of  his  father's, 
Thomas  McKiernan  and  Thomas  Tracy,  served  as  Union 
soldiers  in  the  Civil  War,  the  latter  being  killed  at  the 
battle  of  Gettysburg. 

He  was  prepared  for  college  at  the  Naugatuck  High 
School,  and  in  Freshman  year  at  Yale  received  a  Berkeley 
premium  of  the  second  grade  in  Latin  composition.  He 
was  given  a  Second  Colloquy  appointment  at  Commence- 
ment. 

While  teaching  in'  Public  School  81  in  New  York  City 
during  the  first  year  after  his  graduation,  Mr.  McKiernan 
took  examinations  for  the  Civil  Service,  and  in  September, 
1910,  received  an  appointment  as  clerk.  He  resigned  that 
position  March  14,  191 1,  and  entered  the  Diplomatic  Service 
as  a  student  interpreter  in  China.  In  May  of  that  year,  he 
sailed  for  China,  where  he  began  to  study  Chinese,  soon 
becoming  interpreter  in  the  American  Legation  at  Peking. 
From  June,  1913,  to  December  i,  1914,  he  was  stationed  at 
Shanghai  as  deputy  consul  general  and  interpreter,  then 
being  transferred  to  Mukden,  Manchuria.  He  was,  how- 
ever, detained  at  Shanghai  for  several  weeks,  then  being 
sent  to  Tientsin,  where  the  following  month  he  was  pro- 
moted to  be  vice  consul.     On  December  18,  191 5,  he  was 


1907-1909  ^55 

made  vice  consul  and  interpreter  at  Chung-king,  where  he 
died  May  28,  1916,  from  smallpox.  His  death  prevented 
him  from  entering  upon  his  duties  as  vice  consul  and 
interpreter  at  Canton,  to  which  post  he  had  been  appointed 
on  April  17. 

Mr.  McKiernan  was  unmarried.  Surviving  him  are  his 
mother,  two  sisters,  and  two  brothers.  He  was  a  member 
of  the  Roman  Catholic  Church. 


Karl  Eugene  Murchey,  B.A.   1909 

Born  November  20,  1886,  in  Beloit,  Wis. 
Died  February  27,  1916,  in  Detroit,  Mich. 

Karl  Eugene  Murchey,  son  of  David  Lawrence  and  Mary 
J.  (Nestor)  Murchey,  was  born  November  20,  1886,  in 
Beloit,  Wis.  He  entered  Yale  from  the  Central  High  School 
in  Detroit,  Mich.,  which  had  been  his  home  since  1894,  and 
in  Freshman  year  was  awarded  a  McLaughlin  prize,  a 
Benjamin  F.  Barge  mathematical  prize,  and  a  Berkeley 
premium  for  excellence  in  Latin  composition,  all  of  the 
first  grade.  The  next  year,  he  was  given  honors  in  English 
composition  and  the  first  Lucius  F.  Robinson  Latin  prize. 
He  held  a  Learned  Scholarship  for  three  years,  and  was 
one  of  the  Woolsey  Scholars  for  two,  received  Philosophical 
Oration  appointments,  and  was  a  member  of  Phi  Beta 
Kappa.     Pie  had  contributed  to  the  Lit  and  Courant. 

He  spent  the  first  year  after  graduation  on  the  stafT  of 
the  News-Herald,  a  mining  journal  of  Cobalt,  Ontario, 
Canada.  In  1910,  he  returned  to  Detroit  to  accept  the  posi- 
tion of  financial  editor  of  the  Times;  while  serving  in  this 
capacity,  he  was  made  secretary  of  the  National  Vigilance 
Committee  of  the  Associated  Advertising  Clubs  of  America, 
and  compiled  his  experiences  with  fraudulent  advertisers 
into  a  lecture  in  the  campaign  against  fraudulent  advertis- 
ing, which  resulted  in  fraudulent  advertising  laws  in  a 
number  of  states.  In  1912  and  1913,  he  was  a  reporter  on 
special  assignments  for  the  Detroit  Free  Press.  Since  Jan- 
uary, 1914,  he  had  taught  English  in  the  Cass  Technical 
High  School  in  Detroit,  at  the  same  time  acting  as  advertis- 
ing and  office  manager  for  the  real  estate  firm  of  Paterson 
Brothers  &  Company. 


156  YALE    COLLEGE 

He  died  February  2J,  1916,  in  Detroit,  as  the  result  of 
injuries  received  in  an  automobile  accident  the  previous 
evening,  and  was  buried  in  Evergreen  Cemetery.  The  acci- 
dent followed  a  dinner  given  at  Grosse  Pointe  by  Mr. 
Benjamin  F.  Mortensen  in  honor  of  Mr.  Murchey,  who 
had  accepted  the  managership  of  Mr.  Mortensen's  real 
estate  and  insurance  business. 

During  the  three  years  of  his  newspaper  work  in  Detroit, 
Mr.  Murchey  served  as  executive  secretary  of  the  Detroit 
Stock  Exchange.  He  wrote  a  series  of  essays  for  Detroit 
Saturday  Night  and  several  lectures  for  the  publication  of 
the  National  School  Association.  Mr.  Murchey's  lectures 
were  used  in  the  text  books  of  the  University  of  Wisconsin. 
He  also  wrote  the  chapters  on  English  in  the  new  text  books 
prepared  by  the  head  of  the  Northwestern  High  Schools, 
Detroit.  His  last  lecture  was  given  on  the- day  of  his  deatli, 
on  "City  Influence  on  High  School  English."  He  belonged 
to  the  First  Congregational  Church  of  Detroit,  and  was  an 
honorary  member  of  the  Board  of  Commerce. 

On  September  25,  1912,  he  was  married  in  Detroit  to 
Hope,  daughter  of  Mrs.  Harry  Grantier  Neville  of  Los 
Angeles,  Cal.,  who  survives  him.  He  had  no  children.  He 
leaves  one  brother. 


Roland  Adelbert  Spitzer,  B.A.   1909 

Born  September  21,  1885,  in  Toledo,  Ohio 
Died  May  20,  1916,  in  Toledo,  Ohio 

Roland  Adelbert  Spitzer,  who  was  the  youngest  son  of 
Adelbert  L.  and  Sarah  E.  (Strong)  Spitzer,  was  born  in 
Toledo,  Ohio,  September  21,  1885.  He  was  the  grandson 
of  Garrett  and  Mary  (Branch)  Spitzer  and  a  descendant 
of  Ernestus  DeSpitzer,  who  came  to  this  country  in  1709 
from  France,  where  he  had  spent  four  years  after  leaving 
Germany;  in  France,  the  latter  had  adopted  the  prefix 
"De,"  but  his  children  later  dropped  it.  Through  his 
mother,  whose  parents  were  Lyman  W.  and  Ruth  (Dix) 
Strong,  Roland  Spitzer  was  descended  from  Elder  John 
Strong,  who  emigrated  to  America  in  1630  from  England, 
settling  at  Dorchester,  Mass. 


. 


1909-1914  157 

He  was  fitted  for  college  at  the  Toledo  Central  High 
School  and  at  the  Hotchkiss  School  at  Lakeville,  Conn., 
and  first  entered  Yale  in  1904,  joining  the  Class  of  1909  at 
the  beginning  of  its  Freshman  year.  He  was  a  member  of 
the  University  Track  and  Cross-Country  teams,  being  cap- 
tain of  the  latter  for  three  years ;  in  1908,  he  went  to  Eng- 
land as  a  member  of  the  Olympic  team,  and  he  was  also  on 
the  University  Relay  Team  in  1908  and  1909.  He  belonged 
to  the  University  Club,  and  served  on  the  Class  Picture 
Committee. 

Returning  to  Toledo  after  graduation,  he  became  a  clerk 
in  the  bond  house  of  Spitzer,  Rorich  &  Company,  composed 
of  his  father,  his  older  brother,  and  Mr.  N.  C.  Rorich.  He 
was  made  assistant  sales  manager  in  1913,  and  served  in 
that  capacity  until  his  death.  Since  1914,  he  had  also  been 
treasurer  of  the  Spitzer  Building  Company,  of  which  his 
father  is  president. 

Mr.  Spitzer  was  a  junior  vestryman  of  Trinity  Protestant 
Episcopal  Church,  and  was  actively  identified  with  the  Boy 
Scout  movement  in  Toledo,  holding  the  office  of  deputy 
scout  commissioner.  He  also  held  the  office  of  assistant 
treasurer  of  the  Toledo  Country  Club. 

He  died  at  his  home  in  that  city.  May  20,  1916,  after  an 
illness  of  several  months  due  to  stomach  and  intestinal 
trouble.  Burial  was  in  the  family  mausoleum  in  Woodlawn 
Cemetery,  Toledo. 

On  June  7,  191 1,  Mr.  Spitzer  was  married  in  Toledo  to 
Natalie,  daughter  of  Frederick  J.  and  Ida  (Stone) 
Reynolds,  who  survives  him  with  their  two  children,  Philip 
Adelbert  and  Frederick  Reynolds.  His  two  brothers,  Carl 
Bovee  and  Lyman,  graduated  from  the  College  in  1899  and 
1902,  respectively. 


Walter  Grant  Dickey,  B.A.   19 14 

Born  December  13,  1891,  in  Independence,  Mo. 
Died  November  9,  191 5,  in  Colorado  Springs,  Colo. 

Walter  Grant  Dickey,  one  of  the  five  children  of  Walter 
Simpson  and  Katherine  Letitia  (McMullen)  Dickey,  was 
born  in  Independence,  Mo.,  December  13,  1891.  His  for- 
bears on  the  paternal  side  came  from  Ireland,  where  his 


158  YALE    COLLEGE 

great-great-grandfather,  Nathaniel  Dickey,  was  a  convert 
and  contemporary  of  John  Wesley,  the  founder  of 
Methodism.  Nathaniel  Dickey  was  one  of  the  famous 
thirty-two  stewards  and  leaders  who  were  expelled  from  the 
Society  hecause  they  twice  petitioned  the  Conference  for 
lay  representation  and  the  right  to  have  the  sacrament  and 
baptism  administered  by  their  own  preachers.  His  father's 
maternal  ancestors  came  over  in  the  Mayflozver,  some  of 
their  descendants  serving  in  the  Revolution.  His  mother's 
father,  James  McMullen,  came  from  Ireland  to  America, 
and  was  a  senator  in  Canada  for  several  years,  having 
served  as  a  member  of  Parliament  for  more  than  a  quarter 
of  a  century. 

After  attending  the  Central  High  School  in  Kansas  City, 
Mo.,  for  three  years,  he  entered  Phillips  Academy  at 
Andover,  Mass.,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1910. 
Entering  Yale  the  same  year,  he  completed  the  four-year 
course  in  three  years,  taking  his  B.A.  in  19 13,  but  being 
enrolled  with  the  Class  of  1914.  He  received  honors  in 
Freshman  year,  and  was  given  High  Oration  appointments 
and  Senior  honors  in  French.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
Freshman  Glee  Club,  and  was  secretary  of  the  Bethany  Mis- 
sion in  1912-13,  a  work  in  which  he  was  active  throughout 
his  college  course.  He  took  an  active  interest  in  athletics, 
playing  right  fullback  on  the  University  Soccer  Team,  of 
which  he  was  captain  in  1913,  and  was  also  a  member  of 
the  Class  Hockey  Team. 

After  leaving  college,  he  visited  a  number  of  clay  manu- 
facturing plants  in  England  and  on  the  Continent,  as  well  as 
in  this  country,  after  which  he  became  connected  with  the 
W.  S.  Dickey  Clay  Manufacturing  Company  of  Kansas 
City,  of  which  his  father  is  the  owner. 

He  was  married  to  Belle  Hartman,  daughter  of  James 
White  Waddell  of  Higginsville,  Mo.,  on  June  11,  191 3.  A 
son.  Grant  Waddell,  died  at  the  age  of  three  months,  on 
October  2,  191 5,  and  as  the  result  of  his  death,  Mr.  Dickey 
suffered  a  nervous  breakdown.  This,  with  other  complica- 
tions, caused  his  death  on  November  9,  191 5,  in  Colorado 
Springs,  Colo.,  where  he  had  gone  to  recuperate.  Burial 
was  in  Forest  Hill  Cemetery  in  Kansas  City.  Besides  his 
wife,  he  leaves  his  parents,  two  brothers,  and  two  sisters. 
One  of  the  brothers,  William  Laurence  Dickey,  graduated 
from  the  Sheffield  Scientific  School  with  the  Class  of  1916. 


I 


I9I4  159 


Geoffrey  Lee  Safford,  B.A.   1914 

Born  April  4,  1893,  in  Brooklyn,  N.  Y, 
Died  February  6,  1916,  in  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 

Geoffrey  Lee  Safford  was  born  in  Brooklyn,  N.  Y.,  April 
4,  1893,  the  son  of  Philo  Perry  Safford  (BA.  Oberlin  1885, 
LL.B.  Columbia  1888),  who  was  for  a  long  time  previous 
to  his  death  in  February,  1914,  engaged  in  the  practice  of 
law  in  New  York  City.  His  mother  is  Christabel,  daugh- 
ter of  Samuel  Henry  Lee,  who  took  the  degree  of  BA.  at 
Yale  in  1858,  and  Emma  Chloe  (Carter)  Lee  and  sister  of 
Gerald  Stanley  Lee  (BA.  Middlebury  1885),  a  non-gradu- 
ate member  of  the  Class  of  1888  in  the  Yale  School  of 
Religion;  after  studying  for  several  years  at  Oberlin  Col- 
lege, she  entered  Wellesley,  where  she  received  the  degree 
of  B.A.  in  1888.  The  son  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  St. 
Bernard's  School,  New  York  City,  and  at  the  Hotchkiss 
School,  Lakeville,  Conn.  In  college,  he  was  on  the  Track 
and  Cross-Country  teams  in  Junior  year,  and  received 
honors  Freshman  year  and  Oration  appointments  in  Junior 
year  and  at  Commencement. 

In  the  fall  after  his  graduation,  he  became  a  member  of 
the  faculty  at  Lake  Forest  Academy,  Lake  Forest,  111.,  and 
taught  Latin  and  Greek  there  until  the  latter  part  of  Jan- 
uary, 1 91 6.  At  that  time  he  came  East,  owing  to  the  con- 
dition of  his  health,  and  died  in  Brooklyn  on  February  6, 
1916,  as  the  result  of  serious  abdominal  complications.  He 
was  buried  in  Riverside  Cemetery  at  Pleasant  Valley, 
Conn. 

Mr.  Safford  was  not  married.  He  was  a  member  of 
the  South  Congregational  Church  of  Springfield,  Mass. 
Surviving  him  are  his  mother,  sister,  and  two  younger 
brothers.  He  was  a  second  cousin  of  Walter  F.  Carter 
(B.A.  1895,  LL.B.  Columbia  1898),  and  of  John  H.  Safford, 
who  graduated  from  the  College  in  1904. 


l6o  SHEFFIELD   SCIENTIFIC   SCHOOL 


SHEFFIELD  SCIENTIFIC  SCHOOL 
Louis  Peck  Morehouse,  Ph.B.   1856 

Born  March  30,   1835,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  March  18,  1916,  in  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

Louis  Peck  Morehouse  was  born  in  New  Haven,  Conn., 
March  30,  1835,  the  son  of  Louis  Peck  Morehouse,  a  sign 
painter,  whose  parents  were  Daniel  and  Sarah  (Peck) 
Morehouse.  He  was  a  descendant  of  Thomas  Morehouse, 
who  came  to  this  country  in  1640  from  England  and  settled 
at  Stamford,  Conn.,  and  of  Gershom  Morehouse,  Jr.,  who 
served  as  a  captain  in  the  First  Connecticut  Battalion  during 
the  Revolutionary  War.  His  mother  was  Harriet  Augusta, 
daughter  of  Jabez  and  Catherine  (Lord)  Brown.  Her 
earliest  American  ancestor  was  Francis  Brown,  one  of  the 
prospecting  company  which  came  with  Governor  Eaton  to 
Quinnipiac  about  1637. 

He  received  his  early  schooling  in  public  and  private 
schools  in  New  Haven,  and  before  entering  Yale  in  1854, 
taught  in  Mr.  Lovell's  School  in  that  city  and  also  at  Stam- 
ford, Conn. 

In  1857,  after  taking  part  in  the  preliminary  survey  for 
the  New  York,  New  Haven  &  Hartford  Shore  Line  Rail- 
way, he  entered  the  service  of  the  Illinois  Central  Railroad 
Company  in  Chicago  as  an  assistant  engineer.  He  was 
later  made  assistant  chief  engineer,  and  several  years  after- 
wards appointed  land  commissioner.  For  many  years,  he 
occupied  the  position  of  tax  commissioner,  and  at  the  time 
of  his  retirement  in  1905,  was  acting  as  custodian  of  deeds. 
From  1878  to  1912,  his  home  was  in  Kenwood,  a  suburb 
of  Chicago,  and  since  then  he  had  lived  in  California.  He 
was  a  member  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal  Church,  and  for 
many  years  served  as  a  warden  and  vestryman  of  St.  Paul's 
Church  of  Kenwood.  He  was  an  honorary  member  of  the 
Western  Society  of  Engineers,  of  which  he  was  one  of  the 
founders  and,  for  many  years,  secretary. 

Mr.  Morehouse  died  in  Los  Angeles,  Cal.,  March  18, 
1916,  after  an  illness  of  several  months  due  to  neuritis. 
His  body  was  cremated. 


1856-1864  i6i 

On  October  15,  1861,  he  was  married  in  Chicago  to 
Fredrika,  daughter  of  Christian  and  Maria  (Hagal)  Ger- 
hardt,  who  survives  him,  He  leaves  also  three  children: 
Clara,  George  Gerhardt,  and  Frederick  Ballard. 


Albert  Hiller  Roffe,  Ph.B.  1864 

Born  September  12,  1844,  in  Boston,  Mass. 
Died  June  3,  1916,  in  Newton  Center,  Mass. 

Albert  Hiller  Rofife  was  born  in  Boston,  Mass.,  Septem- 
ber 12,  1844,  the  son  of  Matthew  Roffe,  an  Englishman, 
who  came  to  this  country  and  was  engaged  in  business  as 
a  last-maker  at  Boston.  His  mother  was  Catharine, 
daughter  of  Thomas  and  Catharine  (Martin)  Hiller  and  a 
descendant  of  Mary  Chilton,  who  came  to  America  with 
the  Mayflower  company  in  1620. 

He  received  his  early  schooling  in  the  public  schools  of 
Newton,  Mass.,  and  entered  the  .Scientific  School  from  the 
Newton  High  School  in  1862.  He  completed  the  work  of 
the  civil  engineering  course  in  1864,  receiving  the  degree 
of  Ph.B. 

After  leaving  Yale,  Mr.  Roffe  was  for  a  time  engaged  in 
engineering  work  for  the  Government,  after  which  he  man- 
aged a  subscription  agency  in  Boston  for  some  years.  He 
then  entered  the  lumber  and  grain  business  at  Newton 
Center,  and  for  many  years  was  active  in  matters  connected 
with  the  government  of  the  town  of  Newton.  Since  1900, 
he  had  given  most  of  his  attention  to  his  real  estate 
interests. 

Mr.  Roffe  died  at  his  home  in  Newton  Center,  June  3, 
1916,  after  a  prolonged  illness,  and  was  buried  in  the 
Newton  Cemetery. 

On  March  2^,  1876,  he  was  married  in  Boston  to  Gertrude 
Maria,  daughter  of  William  and  Lydia  Ann  (Drew)  Guild 
of  Newton.  Her  death  occurred  on  December  26,  1909. 
Their  two  daughters,  Gertrude  Hiller  (the  wife  of  Arthur 
Lester  Brayton  of  Newton  Center)  and  Helen  Elizabeth, 
survive.  Charles  A.  Hiller,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in 
1864,  and  A.  Maxcy  Hiller  (B.A.  1866,  LL.B.  1897)  were 
cousins  of  Mr.  Roffe. 


l62  SHEFFIELD   SCIENTIFIC   SCHOOL 


Augustus  Jay  DuBois,  Ph.B.   1869 

Born  April  25,  1849,  at  Newton  Falls,  Ohio 
Died  October  19,  191S,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 

Augustus  Jay  DuBois  was  the  son  of  Dr.  Henry  Augustus 
DuBois  and  Catherine  Helena  (Jay)  DuBois,  and  was 
born  at  Newton  Falls,  Ohio,  April  25,  1849.  His  father, 
whose  parents  were  Cornelius  and  Sarah  Piatt  (Ogden) 
DuBois,  graduated  from  Columbia  with  the  degree  of  B.A. 
in  1827  and  that  of  M.D.  in  1830;  in  1864  the  honorary 
degree  of  Doctor  of  Laws  was  conferred  itpon  him  by  Yale 
University.  Cornelius  DuBois  was  the  fifth  of  the  name 
in  America  and  fourth  in  descent  from  Jacques  DuBois,  a 
French  Huguenot  refugee  from  Artois,  who  fled  to  Leyden, 
Holland,  and  emigrated  to  Esopus,  N.  Y.  Augustus  Du- 
Bois' mother  was  a  daughter  of  Peter  Augustus  Jay,  a 
graduate  of  Columbia  in  1794,  who  received  an  honorary 
degree  from  Yale  in  1798,  and  the  granddaughter  of  Chief 
Justice  John  Jay  and  Sarah  VanBrugh  (Livingston)  Jay, 
the  latter  being  the  daughter  of  William  Livingston  (B.A. 
1741),  a  member  of  the  Continental  Congress,  governor  of 
New  Jersey,  and  a  member  of  the  United  States  Constitu- 
tional Convention.  She  was  descended  from  Augustus  Jay, 
a  French  Huguenot. 

Augustus  DuBois  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  the  Hopkins 
Grammar  School  in  New  Haven,  and  in  the  Scientific 
School  took  the  course  in  civil  engineering.  After  graduat- 
ing in  1869,  he  spent  some  time  in  engineering  work  in 
New  Haven  and  California,  although  giving  the  greater 
part  of  his  attention  to  study  in  this  country  and  abroad, 
spending  eighteen  months  at  the  Royal  Mining  Academy 
in  Freiberg,  Saxony.  He  took  the  degree  of  C.E.  at  Yale 
in  1870  and  that  of  Ph.D.  in  1873. 

In  1875,  he  was  made  professor  of  civil  engineering  at 
Lehigh  University,  but  after  two  years  returned  to  New 
Haven  to  take  up  his  work  as  professor  of  mechanical 
engineering  in  the  Sheffield  Scientific  School.  In  1884,  he 
received  an  appointment  to  the  professorship  of  civil  engi- 
neering, which  he  held  until  his  death.  For  a  long  time. 
Professor  DuBois  served  on  the  Governing  Board  of  the 
Scientific  School,  and  he  was  also  a  member  of  the 
University  Council. 


1869-1870  1-65 

He  was  widely  know  as  a  writer  on  engineering  subjects. 
He  published  several  works  on  Graphical  Statics,  and  was 
the  author  of  a  book  on  Stresses  in  Framed  Structures, 
which  is  regarded  as  one  of  the  most  valuable  books  ever 
written  in  any  branch  of  engineering.  As  one  of  the  Yale 
Bicentennial  publications  he  issued  a  volume  on  Mechanics. 
At  the  time  of  his  death,  Professor  DuBois  had  nearly  com- 
pleted a  new  book  on  Stresses  upon  which  he  had  been  at 
work  for  nearly  ten  years.  He  had  translated  a  number 
of  German  works,  and  had  also  written  articles  on  Science 
and  Faith  and  kindred  subjects  which  were  published  in 
different  magazines.  He  held  membership  in  many  learned 
societies,  including  the  American  Society  of  Civil  Engineers, 
the  American  Society  of  Mechanical  Engineers,  the  Society 
of  Naval  Architects  and  Marine  Engineers,  and  the  Ameri- 
can Society  for  the  Advancement  of  Science.  He  belonged 
to  the  Church  of  Christ  in  Yale  University. 

Professor  DuBois  died  suddenly  at  his  home  in  New 
Haven,  October  19,  191 5.  His  death  was  due  to  an 
attack  of  heart  trouble.  He  was  buried  in  the  Jay  Cemetery 
at  Harrison,  N.  Y. 

His  marriage  took  place  in  New  Haven,  June  23,  1883, 
to  Adeline,  daughter  of  Arthur  and  Kate  (Ives)  Blakesley, 
who  died  seven  months  after  her  husband.  They  had  no 
children.  Four  of  his  brothers  have  graduated  from  Yale: 
Henry  Augustus,  a  member  of  the  Class  of  1859  S. ;  Cor- 
nelius Jay,  who  graduated  from  the  School  of  Medicine 
in  1866,  five  years  after  taking  an  LL.B.  at  Columbia;  John 
Jay,  who  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  in  1867,  graduating 
from  the  Columbia  Law  School  in  1869,  and  Robert  Ogden 
(Ph.B.  1883,  M.D.  1886).  Professor  DuBois  was  a  distant 
cousin  of  John  C.  DuBois  (B.A.  1852,  M.D.  New  York 
University  1857),  whose  son,  Julian,  graduated  from  the 
Scientific  School  in  1890. 


I 


Henry  Correll  Humphrey,  Ph.B.   1870 

Born  June  10,  1848,  at  East  Windsor  Hill,  Conn. 
Died  January  9,  1916 


Henry  Correll  Humphrey  was  the  son  of  Henry  Moore 
Humphrey,  a  graduate  of  Rush  Medical  College,  and  Anna 


164  SHEFFIELD   SCIENTIFIC   SCHOOL 

O.  Humphrey,  and  was  born  at  East  Windsor  Hill,  Conn., 
June  10,  1848.  He  received  his  early  education  in  Stam- 
ford, Conn.,  and  before  joining  the  Class  of  1870  S.  as  a 
Junior,  spent  two  years  at  Amherst  College.  In  the  Scien- 
tific School,  he  took  the  course  in  chemistry,  receiving  a 
prize  for  excellence  in  that  subject  in  Senior  year. 

For  some  years  previous  to  his  death  on  January  9, 
1 916,  Mr.  Humphrey  held  a  position  as  chemist  for  the 
Corn  Products  Refining  Company  of  New  York  City,  his 
home  being  at  Hackensack,  N.  J.  He  belonged  to  the 
American  Philosophical  Society. 

He  was  twice  married,  the  maiden  name  of  his  first  wife 
being  Florence  Barnes  Thurston.  His  second  marriage 
took  place  in  July,  1892,  to  Ada  Eugenie  Stout.  By  his 
first  marriage,  Mr.  Humphrey  had  a  daughter,  Mary,  and 
by  his  second,  a  son,  Henry  Correll,  Jr.  His  nephew, 
Henry  J.  C.  Humphrey,  took  the  degree  of  Ph.B.  at  Yale 
in  1908. 


Thomas  Hubbard  Russell,  Ph.B.  1872 

Born  December  14,  1852,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  February  2,  1916,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 

Thomas  Hubbard  Russell  was  born  December  14,  1852, 
in  New  Haven,  Conn.,  his  parents  being  William  Hunting- 
ton and  Mary  Elizabeth  (Hubbard)  Russell.  His  father, 
a  graduate  of  Yale  College  in  1833  and  of  the  School  of 
Medicine  in  1838,  for  many  years  conducted  a  preparatory 
school  in  New  Haven  under  the  name  of  The  Collegiate  and 
Commercial  Institute;  throughout  the  Civil  War  and  for 
some  years  afterwards,  he  held  an  appointment  as  major 
general  in  the  State  Militia,  being  assigned  to  the  work  of 
organizing  and  forwarding  troops  during  the  war.  General 
Russell  was  the  son  of  Matthew  Talcott  Russell  (B.A, 
1779)  and  Mary  (Huntington)  Russell,  the  latter  being  the 
daughter  of  Rev.  Enoch  Huntington,  a  graduate  Of  the 
College  in  1759,  who  served  as  a  member  of  the  Yale 
Corporation  for  twenty-eight  years  and  as  its  secretary 
from  1788  to  1793,  and  a  niece  of  Samuel  Huntington,  who 
received  honorary  degrees  from  Yale  in  1779  and  1787,  was 


1870-1872  i65 

a  signer  of  the  Declaration  of  Independence,  president  of 
the  Continental  Congress  in  1779,  1780,  and  1781,  a  chief 
justice  of  the  Superior  Court,  and  governor  of  Connecticut. 
His  wife  was  the  daughter  of  Thomas  Hubbard,  from  1829 
until  his  death  in  1838  professor  of  surgery  at  Yale,  where 
he  had  received  an  honorary  M.D.  in  1818.  Among  his 
ancestors  were  many  other  graduates  of  Yale  and  men 
prominent  in  the  early  history  of  New  England,  including 
Rev.  Thomas  Hooker  and  Joseph  Talcott,  one  of  the  early 
proprietors  of  Hartford. 

The  greater  part  of  his  preparatory  training  was  received 
at  his  father's  school,  although  he  spent  the  year  before  his 
entrance  to  Yale  in  Clinton,  N.  Y.,  studying  under  a  private 
tutor  at  the  home  of  his  uncle,  Rev.  Simeon  North  (B.A. 
1825),  ex-president  of  Hamilton  College.  He  entered  the 
Scientific  School  in  1869,  and  in  his  Senior  year  he  was 
awarded  a  prize  for  excellence  in  zoology. 

Soon  after  his  graduation,  he  went  on  a  paleontological 
expedition  conducted  by  Professor  Othniel  C.  Marsh  (B.A. 
i860).  He  took  up  the  study  of  medicine  at  Yale  upon  his 
return  to  New  Haven,  and  received  his  medical  degree  in 
1875.  During  his  course,  he  gave  some  time  to  teaching, 
and  also  served  as  an  assistant  to  Professor  Francis  Bacon 
(M.D.  1853).  In  1875,  ^^  was  resident  physician  and 
surgeon  to  the  New  Haven  Hospital.  Since  that  time  he 
had  practiced  in  New  Haven,  and,  from  1877,  when  he 
became  an  assistant  in  surgery  under  Professor  David  P. 
Smith,  was  a  member  of  the  University  Faculty.  During 
1880-1881,  he  served  as  lecturer  on  clinical  surgery,  after 
which  he  was  for  two  years  lecturer  on  genito-urinary  and 
venereal  diseases.  He  was  appointed  professor  of  materia 
medica  and  therapeutics  in  1883,  and  held  that  chair  until 
his  appointment  in  1891  to  the  professorship  of  clinical 
surgery  and  the  lectureship  on  surgical  anatomy.  For  a 
number  of  years.  Professor  Russell  was  physician  to  the 
New  Haven  Dispensary,  and,  from  1878  until  1908,  when 
he  was  appointed  consulting  surgeon,  served  as  attending 
surgeon  on  the  visiting  staff  of  the  New  Haven  Hospital. 
He  was  a  member  of  Center  Church  (Congregational)  of 
New  Haven,  and  belonged  to  the  American  Association  for 
the  Advancement  of  Science,  several  medical  societies,  the 
Connecticut  Academy  of  Arts  and  Sciences,  and  the  New 
Haven  Colony  Historical  Society.     For  some  years,  he  had 


l66  SHEFFIELD   SCIENTIFIC   SCHOOL 

been  Secretary  of  his  Class  in  the  School  of  Medicine.  He 
had  written  many  articles  for  medical  journals. 

He  died  at  his  home  in  New  Haven,  February  2,  1916, 
after  a  brief  illness  from  pneumonia,  and  was  buried  in 
Grove  Street  Cemetery. 

Professor  Russell's  marriage  took  place  in  New  Haven, 
December  21,  1882,  to  Mary,  daughter  of  Judge  Lyman 
Ezra  Munson  (LL.B.  185 1)  and  Lucy  A.  (Sanford) 
Munson  and  sister  of  Edward  Lyman  Munson,  a  graduate 
of  the  College  in  1890  and  of  the  School  of  Medicine  in 
1892.  She  survives  him  with  their  five  children:  Mary  Tal- 
cott,  Thomas  Hubbard,  Jr.  (Ph.B.  1906,  M.D.  1910),  Wil- 
liam Huntington  (B.A.  1912  and  LL.B.  1914),  Eleanor 
Woodbridge,  now  the  wife  of  Hewette  Elwell  Joyce,  who 
received  the  degree  of  B.A.  at  Yale  in  1912,  and  Edward 
Stanton,  a  non-graduate  member  of  the  Class  of  1916  S. 
Professor  Russell's  brothers  were  Talcott  Huntington  Rus- 
sell (B.A.  1869,  LL.B.  Columbia  1871),  Philip  Gray  Rus- 
sell, who  received  from  Yale  the  degree  of  B.A.  in  1876 
and  that  of  LL.B.  two  years  later,  Edward  Hubbard 
Russell,  a  graduate  of  the  Sheffield  Scientific  School  in 
1878,  and  Robert  Gray  Russell,  who  died  in  1881,  while 
in  his  Sophomore  year  at  Yale. 


Franklin  Edwards,  Ph.B.   1874 

Born  April  10,  1855,  in  Northampton,  Mass. 
Died  February  13,  1916,  in  Springfield,  Mass. 

Franklin  Edwards  was  born  April  10,  1855,  in  North- 
ampton, Mass.,  being  the  son  of  Oscar  Edwards,  presi- 
dent of  a  bank  in  that  city,  and  a  direct  descendant  of 
Alexander  Edwards,  who  came  to  this  country  from  Wales 
about  1640.  Through  his  mother,  whose  maiden  name  was 
Katharine  Wendell,  he  was  descended  from  Oliver  Wen- 
dell, an  early  settler  in  Albany,  N.  Y.  He  was  fitted  for 
Yale  at  the  Northampton  High  School.  In  the  Scien- 
tific School,  he  pursued  the  course  in  civil  engineering,  and 
served  on  the  Class  Supper  Committee  in  Junior  year. 

His  death  occurred  at  the  Nauheim  Sanitarium  in 
Springfield,  Mass.,  February  13,  191 6,  from  a  complication 
of  diseases.    Burial  was  in  Bridge  Street  Cemetery  in  that 


• 


1872-1875  1^7 

city.  In  1890,  Mr.  Edwards  became  office  manager  for  the 
Collins  Manufacturing-  Company  of  North  Wilbraham, 
Mass.,  and  continued  in  their  employ  for  a  long  time. 

He  was  married  in  Northampton,  February  12,  1880,  to 
Anna  M.,  daughter  of  George  P.  Dickinson  of  Brooklyn, 
N.  Y.,  by  whom  he  had  two  sons,  Gilbert  and  Pomeroy. 


Charles  William  Fenn,  Ph.B.   1875 

Born  October  i,  1854,  in  Jersey  City,  N.  J. 
Died  May  2,  IQ16,  in  Portland,  Maine 

Charles  William  Fenn  was  born  October  i,  1854,  in 
Jersey  City,  N.  J.  His  father,  Dr.  Thomas  Legare  Fenn, 
graduated  from  Amherst  with  the  degree  of  B.A.  in  1850, 
and  practiced  as  a  physician  for  a  number  of.  years  in  Wil- 
mington, Del.  His  grandparents  were  Joel  William  and 
Mary  Burden  (Legare)  Fenn,  and  he  was  descended  from 
Benjamin  Fenn,  who  came  to  Dorchester,  Mass.,  from. 
England  in  1630,  and  from  Solomon  Legare,  a  French 
Huguenot,  who  settled  in  South  Carolina  in  1696.  He  was 
related  to  John  Bassnett  Legare  and  to  John  Berwick 
Legare,  both  graduates  of  Yale  in  181 5.  The  maiden  name 
of  his  mother  was  Helen  Marr. 

He  passed  his  boyhood  in  Portland,  Maine,  and  entered 
the  Scientific  School  from  the  Portland  High  School.  He 
took  the  course  in  civil  engineering,  receiving  several  Ger- 
man prizes,  served  as  secretary  of  the  Class  of  1875  S.  in 
Junior  year,  was  a  member  of  the  Class  Crew,  and  sang  on 
the  Sheffield  Glee  Club. 

Mr.  Fenn  went  into  the  Government  service  at  Boston 
harbor  after  graduation,  and  in  a  short  time  was  placed  in 
charge  of  improvements  in  the  Hingham  division.  He  was 
then  employed  in  the  Portland  Locomotive  Machine  Works 
for  two  years  and  afterwards  in  a  large  paper  mill  near 
Portland.  After  serving  for  two  years  as  assistant  principal 
of  the  Gorham  Normal  School  at  Gorham,  Maine,  he  held 
for  a  time  the  position  of  assistant  division  engineer  of  the 
Lake  Shore  &  Michigan  Southern  Railroad  at  Cleveland, 
Ohio.     He  later  became  assistant  to  the  president  of  the 

I  United  States  Rolling  Stock  Company,  and  lived  in  Chicago 
until  1893,  when  he  was  made  secretary  of  the  Missouri  Car 
I 


1 68  SHEFFIELD   SCIENTIFIC   SCHOOL 

&  Foundry  Company  of  St.  Louis.  He  returned  East  in 
1894,  and  for  the  next  two  years  made  his  headquarters  in 
New  York  City,  being  connected  with  Jaffrey  &  Company 
as  traveling  auditor.  Since  1897,  he  had  practiced  inde- 
pendently as  a  civil  and  hydraulic  engineer  in  Portland. 
During  this  period,  he  was  engaged  on  the  construction  of 
a  number  of  large  buildings,  and  had  served  as  chief  engi- 
neer for  the  Portland  Water  District,  as  manager  of  the 
Mechanic  Water  Falls  Company,  and  as  treasurer  of  the 
North  Berwick  Water  Company.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
High  Street  Congregational  Church  of  Portland,  of  which 
his  uncle,  Rev.  William  Henry  Fenn  (B.A.  1854),  a  sketch 
of  whose  life  appears  elsewhere  in  this  volume,  was  for 
many  years  pastor. 

His  death  occurred  at  his  home  in  Portland,  May  2,  1916. 
Three  years  before,  he  had  suffered  a  slight  shock,  from  the 
effects  of  which  he  had  never  recovered,  and  had  since  been 
confined  to  his  home.  Interment  was  in  Evergreen 
Cemetery  in  that  city. 

.  Mr.  Fenn  was  married  January  3,  1883,  in  Portland 
to  Emily  Augusta,  daughter  of  Charles  and  Sarah 
Small,  who  died  December  2,  1894.  Their  two  sons, 
Charles  Henry,  who  received  the  degree  of  B.S.  from  the 
University  of  Maine  in  1910,  and  Herbert  Keaney,  a  gradu- 
ate of  the  United  States  Naval  Academy  in  1913,  survive. 
Mr.  Fenn  also  leaves  his  second  wife,  who  was  Marion, 
daughter  of  Philip  Cahill  and  Bertha  (McGowan)  Silver 
and  to  whom  he  was  married  in  Portland,  January  8,  19 12. 
His  brother,  Thomas  Legare  Fenn,  Jr.,  received  the  degree 
of  M.D.  from  Columbia  in  1882. 


Sidney  Williams  Clark,  Ph.B.   1876 

Born  October  24,   1855,  in  Waterbairy,  Conn. 
Died  July  22,  1915,  in  Hartfordi  Conn. 

Sidney  Williams  Clark,  son  of  Sidney  Lyman  and  Nancy 
(Parsons)  Clark,  was  born  in  Waterbury,  Conn.,  October 
24,  1855,  being  a  descendant,  on  the  paternal  side,  of  Rev. 
Elisha  Williams,  rector  of  Yale  College  from  1726  to  1739, 
and  of  Rev.  Eliphalet  Williams  (B.A.   1743,  D.D.   1782), 


1875-1876  i69 

for  thirty- two  years  a  member  of  the  Yale  Corporation. 
His  njother,  the  daughter  of  Samuel  and  Caroline  (Russell) 
Parsons,  was  descended  from  Cornet  Joseph  Parsons,  upon 
whom  an  original  Northampton  land  grant  was  bestowed. 

He  entered  Yale  from  the  Hartford  (Conn.)  Public  High 
School,  his  family  having  removed  to  Hartford  when  he 
was  about  eleven  years  of  age,  and  took  the  select  course  in 
the  Scientific  School. 

In  the  fall  after  graduation,  he  became  connected  with 
the  firm  of  W.  N.  Pelton  &  Company  of  that  city,  wholesale 
dealers  in  drygoods,  in  which  he  became  a  partner  a  number 
of  years  later.  Since  the  disorganization  of  that  firm  in 
1897,  he  had  been  in  the  brokerage  business,  for  some  years 
being  associated  with  Francis  R.  Cooley  (B.A.  1886).  Mr. 
Clark  had  been  active  in  the  work  of  the  Asylum  Hill  Con- 
gregational Church  of  Hartford,  serving  as  deacon  for  six 
years. 

He  died  July  22,  191 5,  at  his  home  in  that  city,  of  chronic 
nephritis,  from  which  he  had  suffered  since  191 3.  Inter- 
ment was  in  Northampton,  Mass. 

His  marriage  took  place  in  New  York  City,  April  24, 
1894,  to  Amelia  S.,  daughter  of  James  Dean  and  Sarah 
(McCrosky)  Ray,  who  survives  him.  Their  only  child, 
Sidney  Ray,  died  in  infancy. 


Solomon  Samuel  Kohn,  Ph.B.  1876 

Born  December  25,  1848,  in  Galsage,  Austria-Hungary 
Died  April  7,  1916,  in  Boerne,  Texas 

Solomon  Samuel  Kohn  was  born  in  Galsage,  Austria- 
Hungary,  December  25,  1848.  He  was  of  a  family  of 
whom  many  had  for  generations  been  rabbles.  Under  his 
father's  tutorship  in  Hungary,  he  studied  until  thirteen 
years  of  age.  He  then  left  home,  and,  traveling  through 
the  country,  officiated  at  different  congregations  as  cantor, 
and  was  considered  at  that  time  the  youngest  cantor  in 
Hungary.  At  the  age  of  sixteen,  he  studied  under  Chief 
Rabbi  Hirsh,  of  Prague,  and  in  1869  graduated  there  as 
rabbi.  After  filling  several  engagements  in  Europe,  he 
accepted  a  call  to  New  Haven,  Conn.,  where  he  remained 


170  SHEFFIELD   SCIENTIFIC   SCHOOL 

until  1876.  During-  this  period  he  studied  at  Yale,  and  in 
1876  received  the  degree  of  Ph.B. 

The  next  year,  he  served  as  a  rabbi  in  Louisville,  Ky. 
In  1881,  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar  and  practiced  law  for 
a  year.  He  responded  to  a  call  at  Boston,  Mass.,  in  1882, 
and  for  seven  years  officiated  as  rabbi  in  that  city.  At 
this  time,  he  also  gave  private  instruction  in  Oriental  lan- 
guages, and  prepared  and  issued  a  prospectus  on  Mishna. 
His  term  expiring  in  Boston,  he  answered  a  call  at  Buffalo, 
N.  Y.,  where,  although  elected  for  three  years,  he  resigned 
after  serving  only  six  months.  He  was  then  for  a  short 
time  at  Paterson,  N.  J.,  after  which  he  devoted  his  atten- 
tion entirely  to  the  study  of  medicine,  and  in  1892  gradu- 
ated at  Dartmouth  College  with  the  degree  of  Doctor  of 
Medicine.  He  took  a  post-graduate  course  at  the  New 
York  Polyclinic  Hospital  the  next  year,  and  then  settled 
in  Norwich,  Conn.,  where  he  practiced  medicine  for  several 
years,  afterwards  going  to  London,  England,  to  further 
his  scientific  studies.  For  five  years,  he  assisted  Dr.  Lister 
in  the  Children's  Hospital  in  that  city,  and  on  his  return  to 
America  resumed  the  practice  of  medicine  at  St.  Louis, 
Mo.,  where,  in  1907,  he  was  appointed  professor  of  anat- 
omy at  the  Hippocratean  College  of  Medicine  and  Surgery. 

After  instructing  there  for  three  years,  he  was  com- 
pelled, on  account  of  ill  health,  to  resign  and  go  to  San 
Antonio,  Texas.  He  conducted  a  sanitarium  there  for 
several  years,  and  later  moved  to  Boerne,  Texas,  where  he 
died  April  7,  1916. 

In  every  city  in  which  Dr.  Kohn  had  resided,  he  helped 
in  organizing  dififerent  institutions  beneficial  to  Jewish 
life,  and  was  active  in  various  movements  for  improv- 
ing the  conditions  of  his  people.  The  honorary  degree  of 
LL.D.  was  conferred  upon  him  by  Odessa  University  in 
1909,  and  he  had  previously  received  that  of  D.D. 

Dr.  Kohn's  wife  died  some  years  ago  in  Paterson,  N.  J. 
Seven  children  survive,  one  of  whom,  David  Kohn,  is  pre- 
paring for  publication  a  biography  of  his  father's  life,  com- 
bined with  many  of  his  interesting  sermons. 


1876-1877  17 1 


Francis  Rawlinson  Read,  Ph.B.   1877 

Born  March  lo,  1856,  in  New  York  City 
Died  October  i,  1915,  in  San  Francisco,  Cal. 

Francis  Rawlinson  Read  was  born  March  10,  1856,  in 
New  York  City,  where  his  father,  Frederick  William  Read, 
lived  until  about  1865,  at  that  time  going  to  New  Orleans, 
La.,  and  later  settling  in  Texas.  His  paternal  grand- 
parents were  English,  and  settled  in  New  York  City  about 
1815,  his  grandfather,  Thomas  Read,  becoming  president  of 
the  Chambers  Street  Bank.  Through  his  mother,  who  was 
Maria  Louise,  daughter  of  Benjamin  and  Harriet  (Jones) 
Brooks,  he  was  descended  from  Theophilus  Eaton,  first 
governor  of  the  colony  of  New  Haven. 

He  was  prepared  for  Yale  in  Hartford,  Conn.,  and 
entered  the  Scientific  School  in  1874.  After  his  gradua- 
tion, he  became  an  assayer  for  the  Union  Construction 
Mines  at  Cerro  Gordo,  and  while  there  was  appointed 
United  States  deputy  surveyor.  During  1880-81,  he  served 
as  assistant  geologist  in  the  United  States  Geological  Survey 
on  the  Comstock  Mines  at  Virginia  City,  Nev.  The  next 
four  years  were  spent  as  a  civil  and  mining  engineer  for 
the  New  Almadeen  Quicksilver  Mines,  and  he  was  after- 
wards engaged  in  the  general  practice  of  civil  and  mining 
engineering.  For  a  time,  he  was  engineer  of  the  Golden 
Gate  Park,  where  he  laid  out  the  speedway,  later  being 
superintendent  or  manager  of  various  mines.  He  was  one 
of  the  engineers  engaged  in  furnishing  the  Vallejo  water 
supply,  and  was  an  assistant  engineer  for  the  city  of  San 
Francisco,  being  engaged  for  a  time  on  the  Tuolumne  water 
supply  on  the  Tuolumne  River.  As  a  consulting  engineer, 
he  was  frequently  called  upon  to  make  examinations  of 
mines  and  engineering  works  and  to  report  as  an  expert  in 
many  suits  before  the  courts  and  the  United  States  Land 
Department.  The  greater  part  of  his  life  since  graduation 
had  been  spent  in  San  Francisco,  Cal.,  where  he  died  Octo- 
ber I,  191 5,  from  tuberculosis  of  the  throat  and  lungs. 
Burial  was  in  Greenwood  Cemetery,  Brooklyn. 

Mr.  Read  was  a  member  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal 
Church.    He  was  unmarried,  and  is  survived  by  one  sister. 


172  SHEFFIELD   SCIENTIFIC   SCHOOL 


Frank  Hanson  Harrison,  Ph.B.  1879 

Born  August  30,  1856,  in  Indianapolis,  Ind. 
Died  July  23,  1915,  in  New  York  City 

Frank  Hanson  Harrison,  son  of  J.  C.  S.  Harrison,  was 
born  in  Indianapolis,  Ind.,  August  30,  1856.  He  received 
his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  in  Indianapolis  and 
in  General  Russell's  Collegiate  and  Commercial  Institute 
and  the  Hopkins  Grammar  School  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
He  entered  the  Sheffield  Scientific  School  in  the  fall  of 
1876,  taking  the  course  in  biology,  and  was  graduated  with 
the  Class  of  1879. 

After  leaving  Yale,  he  studied  medicine  in  the  College  of 
Physicians  and  Surgeons  in  New  York,  and  received  the 
degree  of  M.D.  there  in  1882.  He  later  practiced  his  pro- 
fession in  Salt  Lake  City,  Indianapolis,  and  in  New  York 
City.  His  death  occurred  at  a  hospital  in  New  York  City, 
July  23,  1915,  from  cirrhosis  of  the  liver.  Burial  was  in 
Indianapolis. 

Dr.  Harrison  married  a  daughter  of  Brigham  Young,  and 
had  several  children.  He  had  for  some  years  been  separated 
from  his  wife.  He  was  a  cousin  of  Louis  Howland  (B.A. 
1879). 


Frederick  Wallace  Paramore,  Ph.B.   1879 

Born  July  14,  1855,  in  Cleveland,  Ohio 
Died  October  28,  191 5,  in  Pasadena,  Cal. 

Frederick  Wallace  Paramore  was  born  July  14,  1855,  in 
Cleveland,  Ohio,  the  son  of  James  Wallace  and  N.  Helen 
(Kloch)  Paramore.  He  received  his  preliminary  training 
under  private  tutors,  and  before  entering  Yale  attended 
Washington  University  in  St.  Louis,  Mo.  He  took  the 
select  course  in  the  Scientific  School. 

His  father,  a  graduate  of  Granville  College  and  of  the 
Albany  Law  School,  was  president  of  the  St.  Louis  & 
Southwestern  Railroad  (Cotton  Belt  Route),  and  after 
graduating  from  Yale,  his  son  became  his  private  secretary. 
After  serving  in  that  capacity  for  some  time,  he  was  made 
purchasing  agent  for  the  road.     In  1884,  he  went  abroad, 


1879-1882  173 

and  upon  his  return  to  this  country,  entered  the  square 
timber  business  in  Arkansas.  Since  the  death  of  his  father 
in  May,  1887,  he  had  served,  with  his  brother,  Edward 
Everett  Paramore  (Ph.B.  1882),  as  administrator  of  his 
estate.  They  formed  the  firm  of  Paramore  Brothers  & 
Company  to  deal  in  investment  securities  in  St.  Louis  in 
1889,  and  of  this  company  Frederick  Paramore  was  presi- 
dent until  his  retirement  from  business  in  191 1. 

At  that  time,  he  removed  to  California,  and  had  since 
made  his  home  in  Pasadena,  where  he  died,  of  diabetes, 
October  28,  191 5.  His  body  was  taken  to  St.  Louis  for 
burial  in  Bellefontaine  Cemetery. 

Mr.  Paramore  was  twice  married,  his  first  wife  being 
NelHe,  daughter  of  George  Hazeltine  of  St.  Louis.  She  died 
in  1884,  three  years  after  their  marriage,  and  on  March  17, 
1888,  he  married  in  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  Harriet  Howell, 
daughter  of  Howell  Atwater,  a  non-graduate  member  of 
the  Yale  Class  of  1863,  and  Harriet  S.  (Chase)  Atwater 
and  a  niece  of  Mr.  Paramore's  classmate,  WiUiam  M. 
Atwater.  She  survives  him  with  their  only  child,  Helen 
Montgomery.  Mr.  Paramore's  brother,  Edward,  is  also 
living,  and  has, two  sons  who  have  attended  Yale:  James 
Wallace  (Ph.B.  191 1)  and  Edward  Everett,  Jr.,  a  member 
of  the  Class  of  1917  S.  Another  brother,  James  Allen  Para- 
more, of  the  Class  of  1891  S.,  died  during  his  college  course. 


Nathan  Gross  Bozeman,  Ph.B.  1882 

Born  February  13,  1856,  in  Montgomery,  Ala. 
Died  March  17,  1916,  in  New  York  City 

Nathan  Gross  Bozeman  was  born  at  Montgomery,  Ala., 
February  13,  1856,  the  son  of  Nathan  and  Fannie  (Lamar) 
Bozeman.  His  father,  who  received  the  degree  of  M.D.  at 
the  University  of  Louisville  in  1848  and  the  honorary  degree 
of  LL.D.  at  the  University  of  Alabama  in  1891  and  who 
served  during  the  Civil  War  on  the  Board  of  Army  Sur- 
geons of  the  Confederate  States  of  America,  having  the 
rank  of  major,  was  the  son  of  Nathan  and  Harriet  (Knotts) 
Bozeman,  grandson  of  Joseph  Bozeman,  who  fought  in  the 
Revolutionary  War,  and  a  descendant  of  Nathan  Bozeman, 


174  SHEFFIELD   SCIENTIFIC   SCHOOL 

who  emigrated  to  Maryland  from  Holland  in  1672.  His 
mother  was  of  Huguenot  descent,  being  the  daughter  of 
Rev.  B.  B.  Lamar,  one  of  the  founders  of  Macon,  Ga.,  and 
Eliza  (Thurman)  Lamar.  She  was  descended  in  the  fifth 
generation  from  Thomas  Lamar,  who  came  from  France  to 
America  in  1685  and  settled  in  Maryland.  Her  grand- 
father, John  Lamar,  served  in  the  Revolution. 

On  her  death  in  1861,  Dr.  Bozeman  took  up  practice  in 
New  York  City,  and  his  son  attended  Manhattan  College 
in  that  city,  Seton  Hall  College  at  South  Orange,  N.  J., 
Wright's  School  in  Morristown,  N.  J.,  and  the  New  Jersey 
School  at  Baltimore,  Md.  He  also  studied  abroad  for  three 
years  under  private  tutors — in  Germany,  Switzerland,  and 
France,  visiting  also  the  hospitals  where  his  father  demon- 
strated. He  spent  the  year  of  1876-77  at  the  University  of 
Virginia  and  the  next  year  at  Coburg,  Germany,  Vevey, 
Switzerland,  and  Paris,  France,  entering  Yale  in  the  fall  of 
1879.  He  took  the  biology  course  in  the  Sheffield  Scientific 
School,  and  was  one  of  the  highstand  men  in  the  Freshman 
Class,  receiving  a  second  prize  for  excellence  in  English 
composition.  He  took  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Philoso- 
phy in  1882. 

He  was  graduated  from  the  College  of  Physicians  and 
Surgeons  at  Columbia  University  in  1885,  and  shortly  after- 
wards passed  a  competitive  examination,  through  which  he 
received  an  appointment  as  surgeon  on  the  house  staff  of  the 
Woman's  Hospital  in  New  York  City.  He  took  up  regu- 
lar practice  in  that  city  in  1885,  and  in  1888  was  made 
assistant  attending  surgeon  and  physician  to  the  Woman's 
Hospital,  as  well  as  to  the  French  Hospital.  From  1886  to 
1889,  he  served  as  an  instructor  at  the  Post-Graduate  Medi- 
cal School.  He  had  become  well  known  as  a  gynecologist, 
and  at  the  time  of  his  death  was  on  the  staffs  of  several 
hospitals  in  New  Jersey,  including  those  at  Bayonne  and 
Hackensack,  St.  Francis'  at  Jersey  City,  and  St.  Mary's  at 
Newark.  He  had  written  many  papers  for  medical  jour- 
nals, and  belonged  to  the  New  York  County  Medical 
Society,  the  New  York  Medical  Society,  the  Society  of  the 
Sons  of  the  Revolution  in  the  State  of  New  York,  and  the 
Southern  Society.  He  was  an  Episcopalian,  being  a 
communicant  of  St.  Margaret's  Church,  New  York. 

Dr.  Bozeman's  death  occurred  at  his  home  in  New  York 
City,  March  17,  1916,  after  an  illness  of  six  days  due  to 


i882-i888  I7S 

pneumonia.     His  body  was  taken  to  Macon,  Ga.,  for  burial 
in  the  family  plot  in  Rosehill  Cemetery. 

He  was  married  on  June  8,  1889,  in  New  York  City  to 
Marion,  daughter  of  Col.  John  G.  McHenry  of  Madison, 
Ga.,  a  graduate  of  Princeton  in  1839,  They  were  divorced 
in  1891,  and  on  September  19,  1899,  Dr.  Bozeman  was 
married  to  Celeste,  daughter  of  Dr.  Heinrich  Malten  and 
Selma  (Werner)  Malten,  who  survives  him.  He  had  no 
children. 


Howard  Greer,  Jr.,  Ph.B.  1888 

Born  May  31,  1865,  in  Cleveland,  Ohio 
Died  August  10,  1915,  in  Detroit,  Mich. 

Howard  Greer,  Jr.,  son  of  Howard  Greer,  a  graduate  of 
Allegheny  College  at  Meadville,  Pa.,  and  Abrilla  (Ecoff) 
Greer,  was  born  in  Cleveland,  Ohio,  May  31,  1865.  His 
boyhood  was  spent  in  Rochester,  Pa.,  Marietta,  Ohio,  and 
Chicago,  111.,  and  he  received  his  preparatory  training  at 
the  Lake  View  (111.)  High  School.  Entering  the  Scientific 
School  in  1885,  he  took  the  course  in  mechanical  engineer- 
ing, and  was  for  two  years  a  member  of  the  University 
Orchestra. 

After  his  graduation,  he  took  a  position  as  draftsman  for 
Morris  Sellers  &  Company  in  Chicago,  and  later,  while  still 
in  their  employ,  was  sent  to  Canada  and  to  England  and 
France  to  introduce  patents  controlled  by  the  company.  In 
1894,  he  became  mechanical  superintendent  for  the  Hey- 
wood  &  Merrill  Chain  Factory  of  Chicago,  but  the  next 
year  gave  up  that  position,  and  was  employed  by  the 
National  Contracting  Company  of  New  York  on  the  work 
on  the  Erie  Canal  for  some  time.  Removing  to  Syracuse, 
N.  Y.,  in  1897,  he  was  for  two  years  superintendent  of 
motive  power  for  the  Syracuse  Rapid  Transit  Company. 
Later,  he  was  chief  engineer  of  the  Lake  Shore  Engine 
Works  in  Marquette,  Mich.,  and  afterwards  was  located  in 
Chicago  as  general  manager  of  the  Thompson-Greer  Com- 
pany. He  then  held  for  two  years  the  position  of  works 
manager  for  the  Bucyrus  Company  at  Evansville,  Ind. 

Since  January,  1914,  he  had  lived  in  Detroit,  Mich., 
where  he  was  connected  with  the  McCord  Manufacturing 


176  SHEFFIELD    SCIENTIFIC    SCHOOL 

Company  as  chief  engineer.  His  death  occurred  at  the 
Harper  Hospital  in  that  city,  August  10,  191 5,  three  days 
after  he  had  undergone  an  operation  for  tumor  of  the  brain. 
Burial  was  in  Rosehill  Cemetery,  Chicago. 

Mr.  Greer  was  married  October  11,  1892,  in  Chicago 
to  Helen  Cossett,  daughter  of  Henry  Munson  Lyman  (B.A. 
Williams  1858,  M.D.  Columbia  1861)  and  Sarah  (Clark) 
Lyman,  who  survives  him.  Four  children,  all  of  whom 
survive,  were  born  to  them:  Howard  Clark;  Margaret 
Lyman;  Henry  Lyman,  and  Helen  Barbara.  Mr.  Greer's 
brother,  Paul  Ecoff  Greer,  graduated  from  the  College  in 

1891  and  from  the  Harvard  Law  School  in  1908.  Rev. 
William  H.  Day,  a  non-graduate  member  of  the  Class  of 

1892  in  the  School  of  Religion,  is  a  brother-in-law. 


Louis  LeSassier,  Ph.B.  1888 

Bom  October  IS,  1866,  in  New  Orleans,  La. 
Died  December  13,  1915,  in  New  Orleans,  La. 

Louis  LeSassier  was  born  in  New  Orleans,  La.,  October 
15,  1866,  his  parents  being  Henry  Alexander  and  Margaret 
Emma  (Pritchard)  LeSassier.  His  father,  the  son  of  Louis 
and  Carmelite  (Bohan)  LeSassier  and  the  nephew  of 
Charles  LeSassier,  one  of  the  three  commissioners  sent  to 
England  to  prevent  the  sale  of  Louisiana  to  Spain  in  1768, 
graduated  from  Jefferson  College,  Covington,  La.,  and  for 
many  years  was  engaged  in  business  as  a  stock  broker  and 
sugar  planter,  and  served  as  president  of  the  New  Orleans 
Stock  Exchange  and  the  Citizens  Bank.  His  mother  was 
the  daughter  of  Richard  Owen  Pritchard,  who  fought  in 
the  battle  of  New  Orleans,  and  Mary  (Ross)  Pritchard. 
He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  the  Hopkins  Grammar  School  in 
New  Haven,  and  entered  in  1885,  taking  the  civil  engineer- 
ing course  in  the  Scientific  School.  He  served  on  the  Class 
Supper  Committee. 

In  July,  1888,  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  Charleston, 
Cincinnati  &  Chicago  Railroad,  as  an  engineer  at  Yorkville, 
but  six  months  later  left  them  to  become  an  observer  for 
the  Mississippi  River  Commission  at  Carrollton,  La.  In 
September,  1889,  he  was  made  supervisor  of  the  Mobile 
and  New  Orleans  division  of  the  Louisville  &  Nashville 


188&-1889  177 

Railroad,  and  continued  in  that  position  until  May,  1891. 
He  then  spent  a  year  and  a  half  at  New  Orleans,  as  assistant 
engineer  in  the  construction  department  of  the  American 
Sugar  Refining  Company.  In  1893,  he  became  connected 
with  the  General  Contracting  Company  of  New  Orleans. 
This  company,  of  which  he  was  general  manager  during 
the  last  twenty  years  of  his  life,  liquidated  at  his  death, 
which  occurred  suddenly  December  13,  191 5,  at  his  home 
in  New  Orleans.  He  had  been  ill  for  several  months,  and 
his  recovery  was  almost  complete,  when  an  attack  of  heart 
trouble  caused  his  death.  Burial  was  in  Metairie  Cemetery, 
New  Orleans. 

He  was  married  in  that  city,  November  21,  1893,  to  Marie 
Louise,  daughter  of  John  Williams  and  Johanna  (Chad- 
wick)  Dwyer.    She  survives  him  with  their  daughter,  Emily. 


William  Bartlett  Beckley,  Ph.B.   1889 

Born  June  16,  1867,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  March  24,  1916,  in  Stamford,  Conn. 

William  Bartlett  Beckley,  son  of  Elihu  Atwater  and 
Elizabeth  J.  (Bartlett)  Beckley,  was  bom  June  16,  1867,  in 
New  Haven,  Conn.  His  father,  a  lumber  merchant,  was 
the  son  of  Silas  A.  and  Amelia  (Atwater)  Beckley,  the 
latter  being  the  daughter  of  Jared  and  Eunice  (Dickerman) 
Atwater  and  a  descendant  of  David  Atwater,  one  of  the 
early  settlers  of  New  Haven.  His  mother's  parents  were 
Buckley  Howe  and  Henrietta  (Richardson)   Bartlett. 

He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  the  Hillhouse  High  School  and 
at  the  Hopkins  Grammar  School  in  New  Haven,  and  spent 
three  years  in  the  Scientific  School,  where  he  took  the 
mechanical  engineering  course. 

Among  the  companies  with  which  he  had  been  connected 
since  his  graduation  in  1889  were  the  following  shipbuilding 
concerns:  the  Harlan  &  Hollingsworth  Company,  the  New 
York  Launch  &  Engine  Company  (of  which  he  was  secre- 
tary and  treasurer),  the  Holland  Submarine  Torpedo  Boat 
Company,  and  the  New  York  Shipbuilding  Company.  He 
was  also  interested  in  the  lumber  business,  being  for  some 
years  associated  with  The  Crosby  &  Beckley  Company  and 
the  Douglas  Lumber  Company  of  New  Haven.     Later,  he 


178  SHEFFIELD    SCIENTIFIC    SCHOOL 

served  as  secretary  of  the  firm  of  Halstead  &  Harmount, 
and  from  about  1904  until  his  death  he  was  president  and 
manager  of  the  Stamford  Lumber  Company,  his  home  hav- 
ing been  at  Stamford,  Conn.,  since  that  time.  In  1912,  Mr. 
Beckley  was  elected  president  of  the  Stamford  Board  of 
Trade,  and  served  in  that  capacity  for  two  years. 

His  death  occurred  March  24,  19 16,  in  the  Stamford 
Hospital,  after  a  brief  illness  due  to  mastoiditis  which 
necessitated  an  operation.    Burial  was  in  Springdale,  Conn. 

He  was  married  in  New  Haven,  December  10,  1890,  to 
Beulah  E.,  daughter  of  George  C.  and  Emily  Pettis,  from 
whom  he  was  divorced  in  191 5.  He  was  married  a  second 
time  September  23,  191 5,  in  Reno,  Nev.,  to  Gertrude,  daugh- 
ter of  Martin  Gill  of  Stamford,  who  survives  him.  He 
also  leaves  two  daughters  by  his  first  marriage,  Gertrude 
Huntington  and  Margaret  Enella. 


Walter  Abbott  Wood,  Ph.B.   1892 

Born  June  2,  1871,  at  Hoosick  Falls,  N.  Y. 
Died  October  8,  1915,  at  Hoosick  Falls,  N.  Y. 

Walter  Abbott  Wood  was  born  June  2,  1871,  at  Hoosick 
Falls,  N.  Y.,  the  son  of  Walter  Abbott  and  Elizabeth 
(Nichols)  Wood.  His  father's  parents  were  Aaron  and 
Rebecca  (Wright)  Wood,  and  his  mother  was  the  daughter 
of  George  H.  and  Julia  (Phelps)  Nichols.  He  entered  the 
Sheffield  Scientific  School  from  St.  Paul's  School,  Concord, 
N.  H.,  and  took  the  course  in  mechanical  engineering. 

After  graduation,  he  became  connected  with  the  Wood 
Mower  &  Reaper  Company,  of  which  his  father  was  the 
founder  and  in  which  he  was  made  a  director.  He  was  one 
of  the  founders  of  the  Noble  &  Wood  Machine  Company 
at  Hoosick  Falls,  and  since  1896  he  had  also  been  a  director 
of  the  First  National  Bank.  In  late  years,  he  had  been 
much  interested  in  farming,  and  operated  on  his  farm  a 
modern  dairy  that  attracted  much  attention,  while  his  herd 
of  blooded  cattle  was  one  of  the  largest  in  the  state. 

Mr.  Wood  had  always  taken  an  active  part  in  local  and 
state  aflFairs.  In  1893,  ^^  was  made  a  second  lieutenant  in 
the  Thirty-second  Separate  Company  of  the  State  Militia, 
and   served   for   several  months   in   the   Spanish-American 


I 

I 


I 889-1 893  179 

War,  and  he  afterwards  became  an  officer  in  the  National 
Guard  of  New  York.  He  was  a  vestryman  of  St.  Mark's 
Protestant  Episcopal  Church  of  Hoosick  Falls.  He  served 
as  a  village  trustee  in  1893-94  and  again  in  1900-01,  and 
in  1902  was  elected  supervisor  of  the  town  of  Hoosick,  and 
served  two  terms,  being  made  chairman  of  the  board  in 
1905.  He  received  election  to  the  State  Senate  from  the 
Rensselaer  County  district  in  November,  1914,  on  the 
Republican  ticket.  His  period  of  service  was  terminated 
by  illness  just  before  the  adjournment  of  the  Legislature 
that  winter,  and  from  that  time  his  health  gradually  failed, 
his  death  occurring-  at  his  home  at  Hoosick  Falls  on  Octo- 
ber 8,  191 5.  He  was  buried  in  the  family  plot  in  Maple 
Grove  Cemetery,  Hoosick  Falls. 

He  was  married  in  Radnor,  Pa.,  October  6,  1906,  to 
Dorothy  Leib,  daughter  of  Charles  Custis  Harrison,  a 
graduate  of  the  University  of  Pennsylvania  in  1862  and 
until  19 1 2  provost  of  the  University,  who  was  honored  with 
the  degree  of  LL.D.  by  Yale  in  1901,  having  previously 
received  it  at  Columbia  and  Princeton,  and  Ellen  Nixon 
(Wain)  Harrison.  She  survives  him  with  two  sons, 
Walter  Abbott,  3d,  and  Harrison. 


Elmer  Arthur  Lawbaugh,  Ph.B.   1893 

Born  October  2,  1873,  in  Phoenix,  Mich. 
Died  August  31,  1915,  in  Chicago,  111, 

Elmer  Arthur  Lawbaugh  was  born  in  Phoenix,  Mich., 
October  2,  1873,  the  son  of  Albert  I.  Lawbaugh,  who 
received  the  degree  of  M.D.  from  the  Long  Island  College 
Hospital  in  1870  and  who  later  practiced  medicine  in  Mich- 
igan, serving  as  surgeon  to  various  hospitals,  railroads, 
and  mines.  His  mother  was  Margaret,  daughter  of  Wil- 
liam and  Caroline  (Emmert)  Smith.  He  spent  his  boyhood 
in  Calumet,  Mich.,  and  attended  the  high  school  in  that 
place,  the  Peekskill  (N.  Y.)  Military  Academy,  Racine  Col- 
lege, and  the  University  of  Michigan  before  coming  to 
Yale.  Taking  the  biology  course  in  the  Sheffield  Scientific 
School,  upon  graduation  he  entered  the  Yale  School  of 
Medicine,  from  which  he  received  the  degree  of  M.D.  in 
1895. 


l8o  SHEFFIELD   SCIENTIFIC   SCHOOL 

He  then  went  abroad,  and  devoted  the  next  five  years  to 
the  study  of  diseases  of  the  eye,  spending  the  year  of 
1895-96  at  King's  College,  London,  and  later  taking  courses 
at  medical  colleges  and  hospitals  at  Berlin,  Vienna,  Prague, 
and  Paris.  In  1900,  he  returned  to  this  country,  and 
opened  offices  as  an  oculist  in  Chicago,  111.,  where,  in  addi- 
tion to  his  regular  practice,  he  served  as  instructor  in 
ophthalmology  and  chief  of  the  clinic  at  Rush  Medical  Col- 
lege and  as  oculist  to  the  Chicago  Orphan  Asylum,  the 
North  Star  Dispensary,  and  the  Central  Free  Dispensary. 
Two  years  later,  after  spending  some  time  in  Oregon  for 
his  health,  he  decided  to  give  up  his  practice  and  enter 
business  at  Portland,  as  a  dealer  in  timber  lands.  In  1906, 
he  formed,  with  Mr.  J.  P.  Brayton,  the  firm  of  Brayton  & 
Lawbaugh,  Ltd.,  with  offices  in  Portland  and  Chicago,  and, 
upon  the  death  of  Mr.  Brayton  in  19 13,  he  became  presi- 
dent of  the  company.  In  its  interests,  he  had  traveled 
extensively,  both  abroad  and  in  this  country,  and  he  was 
considered  an  authority  on  the  value  of  timber  and  timber 
lands. 

His  death  occurred,  as  the  result  of  an  attack  of  blood 
poisoning  which  had  developed  some  months  before,  in  St. 
Luke's  Hospital,  Chicago,  on  August  31,  191 5.  Burial 
was  in  Lakeview  Cemetery  in  Calumet,  Mich.,  the  home  of 
his  parents,  and  in  their  family  mausoleum. 

He  was  married  on  May  9,  1908,  in  Meriden,  Conn.,  to 
Etta  Lyman,  daughter  of  Henry  and  Josephine  Griswold 
(Lyman)  Warren.  She  survives  him  with  a  daughter, 
Marjorie  Warren. 


Mitchell  Campbell  Lilley,  Ph.B.   1894 

Born  November  26,  1869,  in  Columbus,  Ohio 
Died  November  21,  1915,  in  Okeechobee,  Fla. 

Mitchell  Campbell  Lilley  was  the  son  of  Mitchell  Camp- 
bell Lilley,  of  the  M.  C.  Lilley  Company,  and  Amanda 
Catherine  (Brooks)  Lilley,  and  was  born  in  Columbus, 
Ohio,  November  26,  1869.  He  entered  Yale  from  the 
Lawrenceville  School,  taking  the  select  course  in  the 
Scientific  School. 


I893-I894  I8I 

Soon  after  graduation,  he  became  secretary  and  treasurer 
of  the  C.  T.  Nelson  Lumber  Company  of  Columbus.  In 
1898,  he  was  made  general  manager  of  the  Kinnear  Calk 
Company  of  that  city,  but  in  1902  moved  to  Chicago,  111., 
to  take  charge  of  the  Western  plant  of  the  Pullman  Auto- 
matic Ventilator  Company.  While  in  that  city,  he  also 
organized  the  Fischer  &  Gesch  Manufacturing  Company, 
and  served  for  two  years  as  its  president.  Since  1909,  Mr. 
Lilley  had  lived  at  Fort  Myers,  Fla.,  engaged  in  farming 
and  the  cultivation  of  eucalyptus  trees.  At  the  time  of 
his  death,  he  was  president  of  the  Southern  Fisheries  Com- 
pany of  Okeechobee,  Fla.,  where  he  died  suddenly,  from 
heart  failure,  November  21,  1915.  Interment  was  in  Green 
Lawn  Cemetery  in  Columbus. 

He  was  married  in  that  city,  January  3,  1895,  to  Fanny 
Clarke,  daughter  of  Granville  Moody  and  Sarah  (Jackson) 
White.  She  survives  him  with  three  children :  Elise  Camp- 
bell; Emily  Doak,  and  Mitchell  Campbell,  3d.  A  third 
daughter,  Frances  Clarke,  died  shortly  after  birth. 

Mr.  Lilley  had  done  much  for  the  development  of  the 
town  of  Okeechobee,  and  was  vice  president  of  its  Board 
of  Trade  and  a  member  of  the  City  Council. 


Abram  Nave  Ranney,  Ph.B.  1894 

Born  August  17,  1872,  in  Elizabeth,  N.  J. 
Died  in  October,  1915,  in  Biarritz,  France 

It  has  been  impossible  to  secure  the  desired  information 
for  an  obituary  sketch  of  Mr.  Ranney  in  time  for  publi- 
cation in  this  volume.  A  sketch  will  appear  in  a  subsequent 
issue  of  the  Obituary  Record. 


George  Sheffield,  Ph.B.  1894 

Born  February  26,  1873,  in  New  York  City 
Died  January  12,  1916,  in  New  York  City 

George  Sheffield  was  born  February  26,  1873,  in  New 
York  City,  his  parents  being  George  St. John  Sheffield 
(B.A.   1863)   and  Mary   (Stewart)    Sheffield.     His  father 


1 82  SHEFFIELD   SCIENTIFIC   SCHOOL 

is  the  son  of  Joseph  Earl  Sheffield,  who  endowed  the 
Scientific  School  and  who  received  the  honorary  degree  of 
Master  of  Arts  at  Yale  in  1871,  and  Maria  (Stjohn)  Shef- 
field. His  mother's  parents  were  John  Aikman  and  Sarah 
(Johnson)  Stewart. 

His  preparation  for  the  Scientific  School,  where  he  took 
the  select  course,  was  received  at  the  Lawrenceville  School 
and  at  Phillips  Academy,  Andover.  He  was  captain  of  the 
Freshman  Football  Team  and  a  member  of  the  Freshman 
Nine. 

Mr.  Sheffield  became  connected  with  the  United  States 
Trust  Company  of  New  York  City  in  the  autumn  after  his 
graduation,  and  continued  with  that  company  until  1900. 
At  that  time,  he  became  a  member  of  the  Stock  Exchange 
firm  of  Sheffield  &  McCullough,  his  partner  being  John  H. 
McCullough  (Ph.B.  1896).  This  firm  was  dissolved 
Au'gust  I,  1910,  and  since  that  time  Mr.  Sheffield  had  been 
occupied  with  his  duties  as  executor  of  the  will  of  the  late 
Henry  Sanford,  the  great-grandfather  of  his  children.  In 
191 5,  he  became  associated  with  the  firm  of  VanAntwerp, 
Bishop  &  Company,  bankers,  of  New  York  City. 

His  death  occurred  January  12,  1916,  in  New  York  City, 
after  an  illness  of  six  weeks  due  to  cancer  of  the  stomach. 
He  was  buried  in  Sleepy  Hollow  Cemetery  at  Tarrytown, 
N.  Y. 

On  March  2,  1899,  Mr.  Sheffield  was  married  to  Katha- 
rine C,  daughter  of  Samuel  Simons  Sanford,  professor 
of  applied  music  at  Yale  from  1894,  when  the  University 
conferred  an  honorary  M.A.  upon  him,  until  his  death  in 
1910,  and  Katharine  (Cecil)  Sanford.  They  were  divorced 
in  191 1.  A  daughter,  Mary  Stewart,  and  a  son,  Joseph 
Earl,  survive.  Their  oldest  child,  Katharine  Cecil,  died 
October  12,  1907.  His  brother,  the  late  Joseph  Earl  Shef- 
field, took  the  degree  of  B.A.  at  Yale  in  1894  and  that  of 
M.A.  in  1898.  Mr.  Sheffield  was  a  nephew  of  Charles  J. 
Sheffield,  a  graduate  of  the  Scientific  School  in  1867,  and 
a  cousin  of  Thomas  Brodhead  VanBuren  (Ph.B.  1886)  and 
of  Harold  Sheffield  VanBuren,  who  graduated  from  the 
College  in  1878. 


1894-1895  i8.3 


Thatcher  Magoun  Adams,  Jr.,  Ph.B.   1895 

Born  March  13,  1874,  in  New  York  City 
Died  April  i,  1916,  in  New  York  City 

Thatcher  Magoun  Adams,  Jr.,  was  the  son  of  Wilham 
Adams,  a  non-graduate  member  of  the  Class  of  1861,  who 
was  a  member  of  the  banking  firm  of  Adams  &  McHarg, 
and  Helen  (Coolidge)  Adams,  and  was  born  March  13, 
1874,  in  New  York  City.  His  grandfather,  Rev.  William 
Adams,  D.D.,  LL.D.  (B.A.  1827),  was  at  one  time  presi- 
dent of  Union  Theological  Seminary,  and  his  great-grand- 
father, John  Adams,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1795, 
served  for  many  years  as  principal  of  Phillips  (Andover) 
Academy.  The  latter's  father,  John  Adams,  was  captain 
of  a  regiment  during  the  Revolution.  The  founder  of  the 
Adams  family  in  this  country  was  Henry  Adams,  who  emi- 
grated from  England  to  Braintree,  Mass.,  in  1634.  Thatcher 
Adams'  mother  was  the  daughter  of  Henry  and  Margaret 
(Hawley)  Coolidge. 

His  home  was  at  Scarsdale,  N.  Y.,  during  his  boyhood, 
and  he  was  prepared  for  Yale  at  the  Lawrenceville  (N.  J.) 
School  and  at  the  Cutler  School  in  New  York  City.  He 
took  the  select  course  in  the  Scientific  School,  which  he 
entered  in  1892. 

The  first  two  years  after  graduation  he  spent  in  the 
employ  of  Hartley  &  Graham,  dealers  in  firearms  and 
ammunition  of  New  York  City.  In  the  fall  of  1898,  after 
a  trip  around  the  world  with  John  F.  Talmage  (B.A.  1895, 
LL.B.  New  York  Law  School  1897)  and  Frederick  A.  M. 
Schieffelin  (Ph.B.  1897),  he  bought  a  seat  on  the  New 
York  Stock  Exchange.  Shortly  afterwards,  he  formed  with 
Thomas  L.  Clarke,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1897,  the 
brokerage  firm  of  Adams  &  Clarke,  his  uncle,  Thatcher  M. 
Adams  (B.A.  1858),  being  a  special  partner.  This  firm 
became  Day,  Adams  &  Company  in  1902,  through  consoli- 
dation with  Clarence  S.  Day  &  Company,  of  which  George 
Parmly  Day  (B.A.  1897)  and  Julian  Day  (B.A.  1901)  were 
members,  and  in  1913  its  name  was  changed  to  Adams, 
Livingston  &  Davis.  From  March,  1914,  until  his  death, 
Mr.  Adams  was  senior  member  of  the  firm  of  Adams, 
Davis  &  Bartol,  in  which  his  associates  were  Messrs.  Henry 
G.  Bartol  and  William  H.  Radigan,  Morgan  Davis,  who 


184  SHEFFIELD   SCIENTIFIC    SCHOOL 

graduated  from  the  Sheffield  Scientific  School  in  1896,  and 
his  uncle.  Mr.  Adams  made  his  home  in  New  York  from 
1905  to  1915,  and  afterwards  at  Mendham,  N.  J.  He  was 
a  member  of  the  Brick  Presbyterian  Church  of  New  York 
City. 

His  death  occurred  suddenly  April  i,  1916,  in  that  city, 
as  the  result  of  heart  trouble  followed  by  pneumonia.  He 
was  buried  in  Woodlawn  Cemetery. 

On  November  i,  1905,  he  was  married  in  Newark, 
N.  J.,  to  Edith  Atlee,  daughter  of  Philip  Nye  and  Margaret 
(Atlee)  Jackson,  who  survives  him  with  a  son,  Thatcher 
Magoun,  Jr.  He  also  leaves  his  mother,  a  sister,  and  three 
brothers,  two  of  the  latter — William  and  Thomas  Safford — 
being  graduates  of  Yale  with  the  degree  of  Ph.B.  in  1891 
and  1901,  respectively.  Another  brother,  John  Brown 
Adams  (B.A.  1899,  LL.B.  Columbia  1902),  died  in  1907. 
Mr.  Adams  was  a  cousin  of  William  Adams  Brown,  who 
received  the  degrees  of  B.A.,  M.A.,  Ph.D.,  and  D.D.  from 
Yale  in  1886,  1888,  1901,  and  1907,  respectively,  and  who 
graduated  from  Union  Theological  Seminary  in  1890; 
William  A.  Delano  (B.A.  1895,  B.F.A.  1907)  ;  Thatcher 
M.  Brown,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1897;  Moreau 
Delano  (B.A.  1898),  and  Eugene  Delano,  Jr.  (B.A.  1908). 


Hubert  Cowles  Downs,  Ph.B.  1896 

Born  January  24,  1874,  in  Chicago,  111. 
Died  April  24,  1916,  near  Anaheim,  Cal. 

Hubert  Cowles  Downs,  only  son  of  James  Edward  and 
Mary  Ann  (Cowles)  Downs,  was  born  in  Chicago,  111., 
January  24,  1874.  His  father,  a  retired  wholesale  dry- 
goods  merchant,  is  the  son  of  Myron  Day  and  Lydia  EHza- 
beth  (Allen)  Downs  and  a  descendant  of  Governor  William 
Bradford,  who  came  to  Plymouth,  Mass.,  from  England  in 
1620.  Through  his  mother,  whose  parents  were  Elisha 
Allen  and  Rebecca  (Dickinson)  Cowles,  he  was  descended 
from  John  Cowles,  who  emigrated  to  America  from  Eng- 
land about  1635.  Settling  first  in  Hartford,  Conn.,  he 
removed  in  1640  to  Farmington,  and  served  for  some  years 
as  a  member  of  the  General  Court  of  Connecticut. 


1895-1897  i85 

Hubert  Downs  received  his  preparation  for  Yale  in  Chi- 
cago at  the  Chicago  Manual  Training  School  and  the  Uni- 
versity School.  He  took  the  select  course  in  the  Scientific 
School. 

After  his  graduation  in  1896,  he  took'  a  short  trip  abroad, 
on  his  return  to  Chicago  entering  the  employ  of  Sears, 
Roebuck  &  Company.  In  January,  1897,  he  took  a  posi- 
tion in  the  foreign  department  of  the  John  V.  Farwell  Com- 
pany, a  wholesale  drygoqds  house  of  Chicago,  but  after 
six  years  ill  health  forced  him  to  resign.  The  remainder  of 
his  life  was  spent  in  the  West,  principally  in  California, 
although  in  1909  and  1910  he  was  located  in  Denver,  Colo., 
working  at  that  time  in  the  office  of  the  purchasing  agent 
of  the  Denver  &  Rio  Grande  Railroad.  While  living  in 
Los  Angeles,  Cal.,  in  1906  and  1907,  he  was  engaged  in  the 
manufacture  of  door  screens  with  the  Pacific  Screen  Com- 
pany. Since  1910,  he  had  been  living  on  his  ranch,  consisting 
of  about  twenty-five  acres,  near  Anaheim,  in  southern  Cali- 
fornia, devoting  his  attention  to  the  growing  of  walnut  and 
orange  trees.  He  was  just  beginning  to  make  a  success  of 
his  business,  when  his  health  completely  failed,  in  May, 
191 5,  and  he  went  to  Galesburg,  III,  for  an  operation  for 
cancer.  An  explorative  operation  proved  that  nothing 
could  be  done,  and,  after  a  few  months  spent  at  his  parents' 
home  in  Chicago,  he  returned  to  California.  His  death 
occurred  at  his  home,  Nelbert  Ranch,  near  Anaheim,  April 
24,  1 9 16.  He  was  cremated  at  the  Rosedale  Crematory, 
Los  Angeles. 

Mr.  Downs  was  married  June  28,  191 1,  in  Los  Angeles 
to  Nellie  Isabelle,  daughter  of  Robert  W.  and  Martha  Ann 
(Gould)  Gordon,  who  survives  him,  as  do  his  parents.  He 
had  no  children. 


James  Crapo  Cristy,  Ph.B.   1897 

Born  February  8,  1874,  in  Flint,  Mich. 
Died  April  15,  1916,  in  Detroit,  Mich. 

James  Crapo  Cristy  was  born  February  8,  1874,  in  Flint, 
Mich.,  the  son  of  Harlan  Page  and  Emma  E.  (Crapo) 
Cristy.  Through  his  father,  whose  parents  were  Sumner 
F.  and  Sarah    (Hooper)    Cristy,  he  was  descended  from 


1 86  SHEFFIELD    SCIENTIFIC    SCHOOL 

John  Cristy,  who  came  to  America  from  Scotland  or  the 
north  of  Ireland  prior  to  1746  and  settled  at  Windham 
N.  H.  The  earliest  ancestor  in  this  country  of  his  mother, 
who  was  the  daughter  of  Henry  H.  Crapo,  at  one  time 
governor  of  Michigan,  and  Mary  Anne  (Slocum)  Crapo, 
was  Peter  Crapo,  who,  as  a  young  lad,  the  only  survivor 
of  a  French  vessel  from  Bordeaux,  was  cast  ashore  some- 
where on  the  coast  of  Cape  Cod  about  the  year  1680.  He 
settled  at  Middleboro,  Mass. 

He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  the  Detroit  High  School  and 
under  a  private  tutor  in  New  Haven.  Entering  the  Scien- 
tific School  as  a  member  of  the  Class  of  1896,  he  completed 
his  work  for  his  degree  with  the  Class  of  1897  S.,  taking 
the  course  in  civil  engineering. 

During  the  summer  of  1896,  he  worked  in  the  civil  engi- 
neer's office  of  the  Flint  &  Pere  Marquette  Railroad  at 
Saginaw,  Mich.,  and  after  graduation  entered  the  employ 
of  George  Morley  &  Company,  wholesale  lumber  dealers 
of  Detroit,  with  which  firm  his  father  was  for  many  years 
connected.  From  1899  until  the  failure  of  the  company 
in  December,  1907,  he  served  as  its  superintendent.  During 
the  summer  of  1908,  he  sold  lumber  on  commission,  and  in 
the  fall  of  that  year  started  a  small  lumber  yard  in  Detroit, 
which,  in  November,  1910,  was  incorporated  under  the 
name  of  The  J.  C.  Cristy  Lumber  Company.  Two  years 
later,  this  company  was  absorbed  by  the  Detroit  Lumber 
Company,  and  Mr.  Cristy  became  yard  manager.  He  con- 
tinued in  that  position  until  his  removal  to  Birmingham, 
Mich,,  where  he  was  made  manager  and  secretary  of  the 
Mellen-Wright-Stephens  Company. 

His  death  occurred  at  the  Harper  Hospital  in  Detroit, 
April  15,  1916,  after  an  illness  of  about  two  months  due 
to  nephritis.  His  body  was  cremated,  and  the  ashes 
interred  in  Elmwood  Cemetery  in  Detroit. 

From  191 2  to  the  date  of  his  death,  Mr.  Cristy  conducted 
the  agency  for  Oakland  County  for  an  automobile  concern 
under  the  name  of  the  J.  C.  Cristy  Sales  Company.  While 
living  in  Detroit,  he  was  for  several  years  a  deacon  in  the 
Jefferson  Avenue  Presbyterian  Church,  and  took  an  active 
part  in  the  work  of  its  Sunday  school.  His  summer  home 
was  at  Clarkston,  Mich. 

He  was  married  February  12,  1903,  in  Detroit  to  Laura 
Louise,  daughter  of  Joseph  Chittenden  and  Mary  (Parker) 


i897  187 

Hart,  who  survives  him.  They  had  four  children:  Mary- 
Hart  ;  Harlan  Page,  2d ;  David  Hart,  who  died  in  infancy, 
and  James  Crapo,  Jr.  Mr.  Cristy's  uncle,  William  W. 
Crapo,  graduated  from  Yale  in  1852,  receiving  the  honor- 
ary degree  of  LL.D.  in  1882,  and  his  cousin,  Stanford  T. 
Crapo,  is  a  member  of  the  College  Class  of  1886. 


Franklin  Jonathan  Ely,  Ph.B.   1897 

Born  October  8,  1874,  in  Milwaukee,  Wis. 
Died  September  24,  1915,  in  Watkins  Glen,  N.  Y. 

Franklin  Jonathan  Ely,  who  was  born  in  Milwaukee, 
Wis.,  October  8,  1874,  was  descended  from  Richard  Ely 
of  Lyme,  Conn.,  who  had  seven  sons,  all  of  whom  fought 
in  the  Revolutionary  War  and  several  of  whom  graduated 
from  Yale.  The  youngest  son,  David  (Franklin  Ely's 
great-grandfather),  graduated  from  the  College  in  1769, 
served  for  forty-three  years  as  pastor  of  the  Congregational 
Church  in  Huntington,  Conn.,  receiving  the  honorary 
degree  of  D.D.  from  Yale  in  1808,  and  was  from  1788  until 
his  death  in  1816  a  Fellow  of  the  Corporation,  being  its 
secretary  for  twenty-two  years.  He  had  three  sons,  David, 
Elisha,  and  Isaac  Mills,  graduates  of  Yale  in  1800,  1803, 
and  1806,  respectively.  Elisha  Ely,  who  married  Eloise 
Curtiss,  a  descendant  of  the  Sillimans  of  Connecticut  and 
New  York,  was  the  grandfather  of  Franklin  Ely,  whose 
parents  were  Oliver  Curtiss  and  Julia  Eliza  (Peirce)  Ely. 
The  latter  was  the  daughter  of  Jonathan  Lovering  and 
Angelma  (Moulton)  Peirce  and  the  great-granddaughter  of 
Jonathan  Moulton,  colonel  of  the  Third  New  Hampshire 
Regiment  in  the  War  of  the  American  Revolution,  who  was 
given  the  township  of  Moultonboro,  N.  H.,  in  recognition 
of  his  efficient  service  during  the  war. 

His  family  moved  to  Chicago,  111.,  in  1877,  and  he  was 
prepared  for  Yale  at  the  Chicago  Manual  Training  and  Col- 
lege Preparatory  School.  At  Yale,  he  took  the  course  in 
civil  engineering  in  the  Scientific  School.  His  standing  was 
such  that  he  was  in  the  first  division  each  year,  and  he 
served  on  the  Scientific  Monthly  board  during  his  Senior 
year. 


1 88  SHEFFIELD   SCIENTIFIC   SCHOOL 

In  1897,  he  became  connected  with  the  Peoples  Gas, 
Light  &  Coke  Company  of  Chicago,  as  appUcation  clerk, 
and  then  as  draftsman.  In  1899,  he  was  obliged  to  resign 
because  of  ill  health,  and  for  the  next  few  years  he  spent 
the  greater  part  of  his  time  in  travel,  principally  in  Cali- 
fornia, Florida,  and  Europe.  In  1905,  he  again  became 
connected  with  the  Peoples  Gas,  Light  &  Coke  Company 
as  draftsman,  and  later  was  employed  in  the  engineering 
and  street  department.  He  was  made  assistant  engineer  of 
construction  in  1910,  and  purchasing  agent  one  year  later. 
Failing  health  compelled  him  to  resign  that  position  in 
June,  191 5,  and  the  next  month  he  went  to  the  Adirondacks 
with  his  family.  On  August  25,  he  and  his  wife  went  to 
the  sanitarium  at  Watkins  Glen,  N.  Y.,  where  he  died 
September  24,  19 15,  from  Bright's  disease.  He  was  buried 
in  Oakwood  Cemetery,  Chicago. 

On  October  4,  191 1,  Mr.  Ely  was  married  in  Chicago  to 
Geraldine,  daughter  of  James  Philander  and  Henrietta 
(Hill)  Soper,  who  survives  him  with  two  sons,  Franklin 
Jonathan,  Jr.,  and  James  Soper. 

He  was  a  member  of  the  Kenwood  Evangelical  Church 
of  Chicago,  which  he  joined  in  1893.  He  was  largely 
instrumental  in  forming  the  Advance  Club  of  the  Peoples 
Gas,  Light  &  Coke  Company,  and  served  as  its  first  chair- 
man. 

George  Lauder,  Jr.,  Ph.B.  1900 

Born  November  2,  1878,  in  Pittsburgh,  Pa. 
Died  January  4,  1916,  in  Greenwich,  Conn. 

George  Lauder,  Jr.,  was  born  in  Pittsburgh,  Pa., 
November  2,  1878,  the  son  of  George  Lauder,  a  partner  in 
the  Carnegie  Steel  Company,  who  studied  for  four  years  at 
Glasgow  University,  where  he  took  the  degree  of  C.E.,  and 
was  lecturer  in  engineering  science  in  Queen's  College, 
Liverpool,  before  coming  to  this  country  in  1870,  and  Anna 
Maria  Romeyn  (Varick)  Lauder.  His  father's  parents 
were  George  and  Seaton  (Morrison)  Lauder,  and  his 
mother  was  the  daughter  of  John  and  Susan  (Storm) 
Varick.  He  entered  Yale  from  Phillips  Academy,  Andover, 
Mass.,  and  took  the  civil  engineering  course  in  the  Scientific 
School. 


1897-1901  1^9 

Mr.  Lauder  had  given  much  of  his  attention  to  philan- 
thropy since  graduating.  His  home  had  been  at  Green- 
wich, Conn.,  since  1902.  He  was  one  of  the  founders  of 
the  Greenwich  Hospital,  serving  as  its  treasurer  until  his 
death,  and  was  also  a  director  of  the  Manhattan  Eye,  Ear 
and  Throat  and  the  Presbyterian  hospitals  of  New  York 
City  and  of  the  Home  Trust  Company  of  Hoboken,  N.  J. 
With  his  father  and  sisters,  Mr.  Lauder  two  years  ago 
established  the  Anna  M.  R.  Lauder  Chair  of  Public  Health 
in  the  School  of  Medicine.  Yachting  had  long  been  one 
of  his  chief  interests,  and  in  1905  he  won  the  fourth  prize 
with  his  yacht,  Endymion,  in  the  ocean  race  for  the  cup 
offered  by  the  German  Emperor.  He  had  also  cruised  to  a 
great  extent  along  the  Atlantic  coast  and  in  European 
waters.  For  three  years,  he  was  commodore  of  the  Indian 
Harbor  Yacht  Club.  He  was  one  of  the  syndicate  of 
yachtsmen  who  built  the  Defiance  in  1914  for  the  defence  of 
the  America's  Cup.  His  interest  and  support  had  been 
largely  given  to  Yale  rowing  affairs. 

His  death  occurred  at  his  home  in  Greenwich,  January  4, 
1916,  after  a  brief  illness  due  to  pneumonia.  He  was  buried 
in  the  Putnam  Cemetery  in  that  town. 

He  was  married  in  Greenwich,  May  22,  1902,  to  Kath- 
erine  Morgan,  daughter  of  George  and  Maria  Townsend 
(Durfee)  Rowland  and  sister  of  his  classmate,  Jasper  M. 
Rowland,  and  of  Henry  C.  Rowland,  who  took  the  degree 
of  M.D.  at  Yale  in  1898,  and  of  John  T.  Rowland,  a  mem- 
ber of  the  College  Class  of  191 1.  Mrs.  Lauder  survives 
her  husband  with  their  three  children:  Katherine  Varick, 
Mary  Josephine  Rowland,  and  George,  3d.  Mr.  Lauder 
was  a  cousin  of  Remsen  Varick  Messier  (B.A.  1880), 
Eugene  L.  Messier  (Ph.B.  1894),  and  of  Lewis  F.  Frissell 
(B.A.  1895,  M.A.  1897,  M.D.  Columbia  1900). 


Chorbajian  Martin  Luther,  Ph.B.  1901 

Born  February  25,  1875,  in  Marash,  Turkey 
Died  December  8,  1915,  in  Toronto,  Ontario,  Canada 

Chorbajian  Martin  Luther,  son  of  Minas  and  Pearl 
(Monrad)  Chorbajian,  was  born  February  25,  1875,  in 
Marash,  Turkey,  where  he  received  his   early  education. 


19°  SHEFFIELD   SCIENTIFIC   SCHOOL 

In  1896,  he  was  granted  the  degree  of  B.A.  by  Central 
Turkey  College  at  Aintab,  and  the  following  year  came  to 
this  country.  He  entered  the  Sheffield  Scientific  School  in 
1898,  and  was  graduated  three  years  later.  His  name  was 
originally  Luther  Martin  Chorbajian,  but  shortly  after 
entering  the  University,  he  decided  to  reverse  the  order  of 
his  names,  and  had  since  been  known  as  Chorbajian  Martin 
Luther. 

Soon  after  leaving  Yale,  he  went  to  the  PhiHppines,  and 
for  two  years  taught  in  the  public  school  at  Salvadore.  In 
June,  1903,  he  returned  to  the  United  States,  and  a  few 
weeks  later  took  a  position  in  the  United  States  Engineer's 
Office  at  Fort  Michie,  N.  Y.  He  continued  there  until 
February,  1904,  when  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  New 
York,  New  Haven  &  Hartford  Railroad  Company  as 
transitman,  and  for  the  next  three  years  divided  his  time 
between  New  Haven  and  New  York  City.  He  left  the 
New  Haven  Road  in  February,  1907,  to  accept  a  position  as 
draftsman  with  the  American  Bridge  Company  at 
Ambridge,  Pa.  Since  April,  1908,  he  had  been  a  member 
of  the  engineering  staff  of  Mackenzie,  Mann  &  Company 
(the  Canadian  Northern  Railway)  at  Toronto,  Ontario, 
Canada,  and  had  been  principally  engaged  on  the  designing 
of  bridges.  In  1914,  he  was  promoted  to  the  position  of 
designing  engineer  with  that  company.  He  was  a  member 
of  the  Walmer  Road  Baptist  Church  of  Toronto,  and  was 
very  active  in  the  work  among  the  young  people  of  the 
church. 

He  died  in  that  city,  December  8,  191 5,  six  days  after 
undergoing  an  operation  for  appendicitis,  and  was  buried  in 
Prospect  Cemetery.  His  death  was  unexpected,  as  the 
operation  had  been  a  successful  one ;  it  is  thought  that  the 
intense  sympathy  which  Mr.  Luther  felt  for  the  recent 
sufferings  of  the  Armenians  retarded  his  chances  of 
recovery. 

His  marriage  took  place  August  2,  1904,  in  New  Haven, 
Conn.,  to  Marie  Virgin,  daughter  of  Haroutune  and  Esther 
(Sarkissian)  Keshishian.  She  survives  him  with  their  two 
daughters,  Nazenig  Viola  and  Araxy  Nevart. 


I90I-I902  191 


John  James  Wright-Clark,  Ph.B.   1902 

Born  December  13,  1880,  in  Newark,  N.  J. 
Died  November  i,  1915,  in  Newark,  N.  J. 

John  James  Wright-Clark  was  born  in  Newark,  N.  J., 
December  13,  1880,  his  parents  being  John  Gibson  Wright, 
who  served  with  the  Union  Army  during  the  Civil  War, 
ranking  as  a  brigadier  general  at  its  close,  and  Margaret 
Campbell  Clark  (Millar)  Wright.  His  parents  died  in  his 
boyhood,  and  he  was  brought  up  by  an  uncle,  John  Clark, 
of  Paisley,  Scotland,  whose  name  he  adopted.  He  received 
the  greater  part  of  his  education  at  Kutenburn,  Scotland, 
making  final  preparation  for  Yale  at  Westminster  School, 
Dobbs  Ferry,  N.  Y.  He  entered  Yale  in  1899,  taking  the 
select  course  in  the  Scientific  School,  and  received  a  French 
prize  in  his  Freshman  year. 

After  spending  the  first  few  months  following  his  gradu- 
ation in  travel  abroad,  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  Nairn 
Linoleum  Company  at  Kearney,  N.  J.,  as  assistant  manager. 
He  continued  with  that  company  until  his  death,  since  1907 
holding  the  position  of  managing  director.  He  was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  North  Reformed  Church  of  Newark  and  a 
director  of  the  Essex  County  National  Bank  and  of 
Westminster  School. 

Since  1912,  Mr.  Wright-Clark's  health  had  been  poor, 
and  in  November,  1913,  it  was  found  necessary  to  amputate 
his  left  leg  above  the  knee  owing  to  a  cancerous  growth. 
His  condition  continued  to  become  worse,  and  he  died  at  his 
home  in  Newark,  November  i,  191 5.  Interment  was  in 
Mount  Pleasant  Cemetery,  that  city. 

On  May  21,  1902,  he  was  married  in  Newark  to  Helen 
Tod,  daughter  of  Peter  and  Elizabeth  (Perkins)  Campbell, 
who  survives  him  with  two  children,  Margaret  Elizabeth 
and  Peter  Campbell. 


192  SHEFFIELD   SCIENTIFIC   SCHOOL 


Ralph  William  Young-,  Ph.B.   1907 

Born  January  21,  1887,  in  West  Upton,  Mass. 
Died  June  28,  1916,  in  Worcester,  Mass. 

Ralph  William  Young  was  born  January  21,  1887,  in 
West  Upton,  Mass.,  where  his  father,  Alfred  Young,  has 
Uved  since  1879  as  superintendent  of  the  dyeing  department 
of  the  large  straw-goods  manufactory  of  William  Knowl- 
ton  &  Sons.  The  latter  was  the  son  of  William  and  Emily 
Ann  (Atwood)  Young.  William  Young,  a  native  of  Luton, 
Bedfordshire,  England,  came,  with  his  family,  to  Foxboro, 
Mass.,  in  1856,  and  was  a  pioneer  straw-goods  dyer  in  the 
United  States;  he  returned  to  England  in  the  interests  of 
his  firm  in  i860,  coming  back  to  this  country  two  years 
later  and  following  his  trade  until  his  death  in  1904. 
Through  his  mother,  who  was  Mary  A.,  daughter  of  Wil- 
liam Albert  Vinal,  a  sergeant  in  Company  I,  First  Maine 
Cavalry,  during  the  Civil  War,  and  Caroline  (Barwise) 
Vinal,  Ralph  W.  Young  was  descended  from  William  Vinall 
of  Vinehall  County,  Sussex,  England,  from  whom  the 
family  of  Vinal  took  their  present  name.  This  branch  of 
the  family  came  to  America  many  years  ago,  and  settled 
in  Littleton,  Mass.  His  great-grandfather,  Phineas  Vinall, 
went  to  Orono,  Maine,  in  his  early  youth.  Other  ancestors 
took  an  active  part  in  the  Revolutionary  War  and  the  War 
of  1812. 

He  received  his  preparatory  training  at  the  Upton  High 
School,  and  before  joining  the  Class  of  1907  in  the  Scien- 
tific School  in  February,  1906,  spent  two  and  a  half  years 
at  the  Worcester  Polytechnic  Institute. 

He  continued  his  studies  in  mining  at  Yale  for  a  year 
after  taking  his  degree,  serving  also  at  this  time  as  an 
assistant  in  Hammond  Laboratory.  From  January,  1909, 
until  June,  1910,  he  was  located  in  California,  being 
employed  by  the  Mammoth  Copper  Mining  Company,  at 
first  at  their  mine  near  Kennett,  and  afterwards  at  the 
"Original  Quartz  Hill"  mine  near  Buckeye.  He  then  went 
to  Mexico,  and  for  several  years  was  connected  with  the 
Compania  de  Real  del  Monte  y  Pachuca,  a  subsidiary  (as 
is  also  the  Mammoth  Copper  Mining  Company)  of  the 
United  States  Smelting  &  Refining  Company.  He  later 
was  at  the    "Dificultad"    mine,  near  Pachuca,  his  position 


1907-1908  193 

at  the  time  of  his  return  to  this  country  in  the  spring  of 
1914  being  that  of  chief  engineer  of  all  the  mines  of  the 
company  in  Mexico.  The  last  two  years  of  his  life  were 
spent  in  graduate  work  in  the  Sheffield  Scientific  School. 

On  May  15,  19 16,  he  underwent  a  serious  operation  for 
sarcoma,  and  later  complications  developed,  his  death  fol- 
lowing on  June  28  in  the  Worcester  (Mass.)  City  Hospital. 
Burial  was  in  Maplewood  Cemetery  in  his  native  town.  A 
short  time  before  his  death,  Mr.  Young  had  accepted  a 
position  with  the  Hardinge  Conical  Mill  Company  of  New 
York  City. 

He  was  married  June  5,  1916,  in  New  Haven,  Conn., 
to  Sara  Nichols,  daughter  of  Rufus  T.  and  Angeline 
(Parcells)  Rockwell.  She  survives  him,  as  do  his  parents, 
a  brother,  and  a  sister. 


Winfield  Clarence  Miller,  Ph.B.   1908 

Born  December  7,  1884,  in  Kingston,  Mo. 
Died  October  31,  1915,  at  Saranac  Lake,  N.  Y. 

Winfield  Clarence  Miller,  son  of  Winfield  and  Edith  Eliza- 
beth (Filby)  Miller,  was  born  December  7,  1884,  in  Kings- 
ton, Mo.,  where  his  father  was  at  the  time  clerk  of  the 
Circuit  Court  and,  ex-officio,  recorder  of  deeds.  Since  1889, 
the  latter  has  lived  in  Indianapolis,  Ind.,  and  until  191 1  he 
served  as  financial  correspondent  of  the  Connecticut  Mutual 
Life  Insurance  Company  for  Ohio  and  Indiana;  he  was 
also  for  three  years  president  of  the  ^tna  Trust  &  Savings 
Company  of  Indianapolis.  After  graduating  from  the 
Shortridge  High  School  in  that  city,  the  son  spent  one  year 
at  the  Culver  (Ind.)  Military  Academy  and  another  at 
Purdue  University.  He  entered  Yale  in  1905,  and  took  the 
select  course  in  the  Scientific  School. 

From  his  graduation  until  191 1,  he  was  associated  with 
his  father,  being  engaged  in  field  and  office  work  for  the 
Connecticut  Mutual  Life  Insurance  Company.  In  the  latter 
part  of  191 1,  he  accepted  the  position  of  secretary  and 
treasurer  of  the  Art  Garment  Company  of  Indianapolis,  but 
was  compelled  to  resign  in  January,  191 2,  on  account  of 
tubercular  trouble,  which  was  first  disclosed  in  that  month. 
From  that  time,  he  resided  at  Saranac  Lake,  N.  Y.,  and  at 


194  SHEFFIELD    SCIENTIFIC    SCHOOL 

Minocqua,  Wis.,  except  for  short  periods  spent  at  his  home 
in  Indianapolis  and  about  four  months  in  191 5  in  Albu- 
querque, N.  Mex.  His  death  occurred  October  31,  191 5, 
at  Saranac  Lake,  and  his  body  was  taken  to  Indianapolis  for 
burial  in  Crown  Hill  Cemetery. 

He  was  unmarried,  and  is  survived  by  his  father  and  a 
brother,  Blaine  Heston  Miller,  who  studied  civil  engineering 
at  the  Massachusetts  Institute  of  Technology  for  several 
years.  Paul  M.  Mohr  (B.A.  1901)  is  a  cousin  of  Mr. 
Miller. 


John  Fedor  Bernhardi,  Ph.B.  1909 

Born  July  19,  1887,  in  Jamaica,  N.  Y. 
Died  June  2,  1916,  in  New  Haven,  Conn, 

John  Fedor  Bernhardi  was  the  son  of  Fedor  E.  and 
Frances  (Shaw)  Bernhardi,  and  was  born  at  Jamaica,  Long 
Island,  N.  Y.,  July  19,  1887.  His  father's  parents  were 
Fedor  and  Ernestine  (Rabe)  Bernhardi  of  Ronneburg, 
Saxe-Altenburg,  Germany.  His  mother  is  the  daughter  of 
William  and  Lydia  (O'Donnell)  Shaw.  Through  her,  he 
was  descended  from  John  and  Margaret  O'Donnell,  who 
came  to  New  York  in  1818  from  Ireland. 

He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  the  Jamaica  High  School,  and 
in  the  Scientific  School  took  the  course  in  civil  engineering. 

In  the  fall  after  his  graduation,  he  entered  the  employ  of 
the  Long  Island  Railroad  as  a  civil  engineer,  and  after- 
wards worked  for  the  New  York  Central  Railroad  Com- 
pany in  New  York  City,  and  for  the  Red  Hook  Light  & 
Power  Company  of  Bingham  Mills,  N.  Y. 

Mr.  Bernhardi  died  June  2,  1916,  at  his  home  in  New 
Haven,  after  an  illness  of  three  weeks,  due  to  meningitis. 
His  body  was  taken  to  Jamaica  for  burial.  At  the  time 
of  his  death,  he  was  connected  with  The  Connecticut  Com- 
pany as  a  civil  engineer,  and  had  been  located  in  New 
Haven  since  July  of  the  previous  year. 

On  July  20,  19 14,  he  was  married  in  Penn  Yan,  N.  Y., 
to  Sara,  daughter  of  Martin  and  Katherine  (Costello) 
Gavin,  who  survives  him  without  children.  He  leaves  also 
his  mother  and  two  brothers.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
Roman  Catholic  Church. 


1908-1909  195 


William  Byers  Denton,  Ph.B.   1909 

Born  May  21,  1888,  in  Sycamore,  III. 
Died  March  19,  1916,  near  Pueblo,  Colo. 

William  Byers  Denton,  son  of  Gilbert  Henry  and  Anna 
(Byers)  Denton,  was  born  May  21,  1888,  in  Sycamore, 
111.  His  father's  parents  were  Solomon  and  Olive  (Crosby) 
Denton,  and  through  him  he  was  descended  from  Solomon 
Denton,  2d,  who  was  born  in  Greenwich  County  in  1750. 
Mrs.  Denton  is  the  daughter  of  William  M.  and  Jane 
(Ade"e)  Byers  and  a  descendant  of  James  Byers,  who  came 
to  America  from  Dumfriesshire,  Scotland,  in  1818,  settling 
at  Andes,  N.  Y. 

The  son  was  prepared  for  Yale  at  the  West  Denver 
(Colo.)  High  School,  and  took  the  electrical  engineering 
course  in  the  Scientific  School.  He  was  awarded  a  Spanish 
prize  in  his  first  year  and  honors  for  excellence  in  all  studies 
as  a  Junior. 

He  continued  his  work  in  engineering  at  the  Massachu- 
setts Institute  of  Technology  after  graduating  from  Yale, 
receiving  the  degree  of  B.S.  there  in  191 1.  The  next  four 
years  were  spent  as  a  member  of  the  engineering  staff  of 
the  Vulcan  Iron  Works  of  Denver,  of  which  his  father  is 
president.  In  October,  1915,  he  took  a  position  as  engineer 
for  the  Colorado  Fuel  &  Iron  Company  at  Pueblo,  Colo. 

On  March  19,  1916,  while  still  in  their  employ,  he  was 
accidentally  drowned  in  the  Arkansas  River,  near  Pueblo, 
His  body  was  taken  to  Denver  for  cremation.  Mr.  Denton 
was  not  married.  His  parents,  a  sister,  and  a  brother 
survive  him. 


James  Edward  Schall,  Jr.,  Ph.B.   1909 

Born  May  i8,  1888,  in  Columbia,  Pa. 
Died  March  15,  igi6,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 

James  Edward  Schall,  Jr.,  was  born  May  18,  1888,  in 
Columbia,  Pa.,  where  his  father,  James  Edward  Schall,  was 
at  the  time  engaged  in  business  as  manager  of  a  rolling  mill. 
The  latter  moved  to  New  Haven,  Conn.,  with  his  family, 
in  1899,  and  is  at  present  head  of  the  firm  of  J.  E.  Schall  & 


196  SHEFFIELD    SCIENTIFIC    SCHOOL 

Company,  dealers  in  iron  and  steel.  He  is  the  son  of  James 
Augustus  and  Katharine  E.  (Small)  Schall.  His  wife  is 
Laura,  daughter  of  Charles  Frederick  and  J.  Ellen 
(Caufman)  Sheaf er. 

Their  son  was  prepared  for  Yale  at  the  New  Haven  High 
School,  and  first  entered  the  Scientific  School  in  1905.  He 
left  in  his  first  year,  however,  joining  the  Class  of  1909  S. 
as  a  Freshman.     He  took  the  civil  engineering  course. 

Since  graduation,  Mr.  Schall  had  been  continuously 
employed  by  the  Southern  New  England  Telephone  Com- 
pany at  New  Haven  as  an  accountant.  He  was  a  member 
of  St.  Paul's  Church  (Protestant  Episcopal)  of  that  city. 

His  death  occurred  at  his  parents'  home,  March  15, 
1916,  being  due  to  nephritis.  His  illness  was  very  short, 
and  death  came  suddenly.  Pie  was  buried  in  Evergreen 
Cemetery,  New  Haven. 

Mr.  Schall  was  not  married.  Besides  his  parents,  he  is 
survived  by  two  brothers,  Howard  Sheafer  Schall,  who 
graduated  at  Yale  with  the  degree  of  Ph.B.  in  1907,  and 
Charles  Frederick  Schall. 


Winfred  Clark  Warner,  Ph.B.   1910 

Born  December  12,  1887,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  January  20,  1916,  at  Saranac  Lake,  N.  Y. 

Winfred  Clark  Warner,  son  of  William  Ailing  and  Nettie 
Clark  (Ensign)  Warner,  was  born  December  12,  1887,  in 
New  Haven,  Conn.  His  father,  whose  parents  were  Sher- 
man R.  and  Delia  Caroline  (Hodges)  Warner,  is  president 
and  treasurer  of  The  Warner-Miller  Company  of  New 
Haven.  His  mother  was  the  daughter  of  Edwin  W.  and 
Julia  Maria  (Mix)  Ensign.  He  received  his  preliminary 
education  at  the  New  Haven  Pligh  School  and  at  the  Booth 
Preparatory  School  in  New  Haven.  He  entered  Yale  in 
1907,  taking  the  course  in  electrical  engineering  in  the 
Scientific  School,  but  was  not  able  to  complete  his  course, 
as  it  was  found  that  he  was  suffering  from  tuberculosis, 
and  he  was  forced  to  leave  in  February  of  Senior  year.  In 
Freshman  year,  he  was  given  honorable  mention  in  chemis- 
try. His  degree  was  voted  to  him  in  November,  1910,  and 
he  was  at  that  time  enrolled  with  his  Class. 


1909-1911  197 

Since  withdrawing  from  Yale,  he  had  Hved  at  Saranac 
Lake,  N.  Y.,  coming  to  his  home  in  New  Haven  for  short 
periods  when  his  condition  was  somewhat  improved.  lie 
was  usually  able  to  spend  some  time  each  summer  at  his 
father's  camp  at  Blue  Mountain  Lake  in  the  Adirondacks. 
His  death  occurred  at  Saranac  Lake,  January  20,  1916, 
and  he  was  buried  in  Evergreen  Cemetery  at  New  Haven. 

Mr.  Warner  had  not  married.  His  father,  step-mother, 
and  a  half-brother  survive  him. 


Walter  Mackintosh  Geddes,  Ph.B.   191 1 

Born  November  13,  1885,  in  Newark,  N.  J. 
Died  November  7,  1915,  in  Smyrna,  Asia  Minor 

Walter  Mackintosh  Geddes  was  born  in  Newark,  N.  J., 
November  13,  1885,  his  father  being  Alexander  Geddes, 
who  interrupted  his  course  at  the  University  of  Edin- 
burgh to  go  to  Asia  Minor  as  construction  engineer  for 
the  MacAndrews  &  Forbes  Company,  manufacturers  of 
licorice,  and  at  the  close  of  our  Civil  War  came  to  the 
United  vStates  to  open  an  American  agency  of  the  company. 
He  continued  as  general  manager  for  the  company  at  New- 
ark until  his  death,  and  for  several  years  served  as  health 
commissioner  for  that  city.  Walter  Geddes'  mother  was 
Susan  Isabel,  daughter  of  George  Baker  of  Woolwich, 
England. 

He  studied  at  the  Newark  High  School  and  at  the 
Stevens  Institute  of  Technology  at  Hoboken,  N.  J.,  in 
preparation  for  his  college  course,  and  before  entering  Yale 
in  1908,  spent  several  years  as  a  ranchman  in  the  West  and 
in  travel  abroad.  As  a  member  of  the  Class  of  191 1  S.,  he 
took  the  forestry  course,  and  after  receiving  his  Ph.B.,  he 
continued  his  studies  in  the  Yale  School  of  Forestry  for  a 
year,  being  graduated  with  the  degree  of  M.F.  in  1912. 

In  July  of  that  year,  he  entered  the  employ  of  Peters, 
Byrne  &  Company,  tree  surgeons  of  Pittsburgh,  Pa.,  as  a 
solicitor,  but  early  in  the  following  year  he  became  con- 
nected with  the  MacAndrews  &  Forbes  Company.  He  was 
sent  abroad  in  March,  1913,  to  represent  them  at  Aleppo, 
Syria,  and  in  the  fall  of  that  year  became  local  manager  for 


198  SHEFFIELD    SCIENTIFIC    SCHOOL 

the  company  at  Damascus.     His  death  occurred  at  Smyrna.. 
Asia  Minor,  November  7,  191 5. 

He  was  married  in  Denver,  Colo.,  October  30,  1912,  to 
Rebekah  Virginia,  daughter  of  Edward  Pottle  Botsford. 
Mrs.  Geddes,  who  has  been  in  this  country  since  the  out- 
break of  the  European  war,  survives  her  husband  with  their 
son,  George  Baker.  Mr.  Geddes  served  for  a  time  as  Sec- 
retary of  his  Class  in  the  School  of  Forestry,  but  resigned 
on  taking  up  his  work  abroad. 


Edward  Hodges  Norton,  Ph.B.   191 1 

Born  November  3,  1888,  in  Torrington,  Conn. 
Died  October  23,  1915,  in  Boston,  Mass. 

Edward  Hodges  Norton,  son  of  Edward  Mills  Norton, 
who  is  employed  in  the  American  Brass  Company,  and 
whose  parents  were  Edward  and  Mary  (Wooster)  Norton, 
was  born  in  Torrington,  Conn.,  November  3,  1888.  His 
mother  was  Helen,  daughter  of  Levi  Hodges,  at  one  time 
a  colonel  in  the  Connecticut  Militia,  and  Delia  C.  (Drake) 
Hodges.  His  paternal  ancestor,  Thomas  Norton,  came  to 
Massachusetts  in  1639,  and  his  maternal  ancestor,  Capt. 
William  Hodges,  some  years  earlier. 

Before  entering  Yale  in  1908,  he  attended  the  public 
schools  of  Torrington  and  Ansonia,  receiving  his  final  prep- 
aration at  the  Ansonia  High  School.  He  took  the  course 
in  chemistry  in  the  Scientific  School,  and  received  honors 
in  German  in  his  Freshman  year. 

Mr.  Norton  was  a  laboratory  assistant  at  Yale  from  the 
fall  of  1911  until  January,  1912,  when  he  began  work  as 
a  chemist  for  the  Kolynos  Company  of  New  Haven,  con- 
tinuing with  that  company  until  his  death,  which  occurred 
October  23,  191 5,  in  Boston,  where  he  was  spending  a  few- 
days.  The  cause  of  his  death  was  diabetes,  from  which  he 
had  suffered  for  about  ten  months.  His  body  was  taken  to 
Torrington  for  burial. 

He  was  not  married.  His  father,  a  sister,  and  two 
brothers,  the  elder,  Richard  Drake,  being  a  member  of  the 
College  Class  of  1919,  survive  him.  He  belonged  to  the 
First  Congregational  Church  of  Torrington. 


1911-1915  199 


Paul  Edward  Mower  Tiesing,  Ph.B.   191 5 

Born  April  22,  1895,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  November  15,  1915,  in  Baltimore,  Md. 

Paul  Edward  Mower  Tiesing,  son  of  Edward  John  Ties- 
ing,  whose  parents  were  Frank  William  and  Martha 
Dorothy  Tiesing,  was  born  in  New  Haven,  Conn.,  April 
22,  1895,  his  mother  being  Annie  Elizabeth,  daughter  of 
Samuel  Erastus  and  Annie  Elizabeth  Mower.  He  was  pre- 
pared for  Yale  at  the  New  Haven  High  School,  and  took 
the  course  in  biology  in  the  Sheffield  Scientific  School, 
receiving  honors  in  that  subject  Freshman  year. 

In  the  fall  after  his  graduation,  he  entered  Johns  Hopkins 
University  with  the  intention  of  taking  -the  four-year  course 
in  surgery.  His  death  occurred  at  the  Johns  Hopkins  Hos- 
pital in  Baltimore,  Md.,  November  15,  1915,  following  an 
operation  for  an  abscess  of  the  lung  and  an  attack  of  pneu- 
monia.   His  body  was  taken  to  Windsor,  Vt.,  for  burial. 

Mr.  Tiesing  was  not  married.  Both  parents  survive  him. 
He  belonged  to  the  Humphrey  Street  Congregational 
Church  of  New  Haven. 


GRADUATE   SCHOOL 


GRADUATE  SCHOOL 
Joseph  Cullen  Messick,  M.A.  1909 

Born  May  i,  1876,  in  Mechanicsburg,  Ohio 
Died  February  3,  1916,  in  Delaware,  Ohio 

Joseph  Cullen  Messick,  son  of  James  Jefferson  and 
Frances  Adelia  (Wilkinson)  Messick,  was  born  May  i, 
1876,  in  Mechanicsburg,  Ohio.  On  the  paternal  side,  he 
was  of  German  descent,  his  ancestors  being  among  the 
earliest  settlers  in  Virginia.  His  mother  was  of  Scotch- 
Irish  origin. 

He  received  his  preparatory  training  in  the  Mechanicsburg 
High  School,  and  after  spending  a  year  at  Western  Reserve 
University,  entered  Ohio  Wesleyan  University,  where  he 
was  graduated  as  a  Bachelor  of  Arts  in  1902.  Mr.  Mes- 
sick's  special  interest  was  Latin,  and  in  1908  he  began  a 
year  of  graduate  work  at  Yale  on  a  University  Fellowship. 
He  received  the  degree  of  M.A.  in  1909. 

During  the  next  year,  he  was  acting  head  of  the  Latin 
Department,  and  an  associate  professor,  at  Ohio  Wesleyan. 
In  1910,  he  was  appointed  to  the  Brown  professorship  of 
Latin,  and  served  thereafter  as  head  of  the  department.  He 
had  given  much  time  to  research  in  Latin,  but  had  not  at  the 
time  of  his  death  completed  any  work  for  publication.  In 
the  summer  of  19 12,  he  traveled  in  Europe,  spending  most 
of  his  time  in  Rome.  He  was  a  member  of  Phi  Beta 
Kappa,  the  School  Masters  Club  of  Central  Ohio,  and  the 
Classical  Association  of  the  Middle  West.  He  belonged 
to  the  Methodist  Episcopal  Church,  and  for  seven  years 
taught  a  Sunday  school  class  of  college  students. 

Professor  Messick's  death  occurred  in  Delaware,  Ohio, 
February  3,  1916,  as  the  result  of  an  attack  of  pneumonia, 
and  he  was  buried  in  that  town. 

On  June  21,  1906,  he  was  married  in  Alliance,  Ohio,  to 
Clara  Birdlyn,  daughter  of  Judson  S.  and  Rachael  Susanna 
(Feter)  Millhon,  who  survives  him  with  a  daughter, 
Katherine  Millhon.  Mrs.  Messick  graduated  at  Mount 
Union  College  at  Alliance  with  the  degree  of  Litt.B.  in 
1906. 


M.A.    I909-PII.D.    1909 


John  Carey  Boals,  Ph.D.   1877 

Born  November  i6,  1850,  in  Somerville,  Tenn. 
Died  November  17,  1908,  in  Covington,  Tenn. 

It  has  been  impossible  to  secure  the  desired  information 
for  an  obituary  sketch  of  Dr.  Boals  in  time  for  publication 
in  this  volume.  A  sketch  will  appear  in  a  subsequent  issue 
of  the  Obituary  Record. 


Kannosuke  Kawanaka,  Ph.D.   1909 

Died  April  5,  igi6,  in  Kyoto,  Japan 

It  has  been  impossible  to  secure  the  desired  information 
for  an  obituary  sketch  of  Dr.  Kawanaka  in  time  for  publica- 
tion in  this  volume.  A  sketch  will  appear  in  a  subsequent 
issue  of  the  Obituary  Record. 


SCHOOL   OF    MEDICINE 


SCHOOL  OF  MEDICINE 
Frank  Gallagher,  M.D.   1864 

Born  March  19,  1845,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  March  25,  1916,  in  Newport,  Ore. 

Frank  Gallagher  was  born  March  19,  1845,  in  New  Haven, 
Conn.,  the  son  of  James  Gallagher,  a  cigar  manufacturer. 
The  latter  served  for  some  years  as  a  member  of  the  Board 
of  Public  Works  of  New  Haven,  Conn.,  to  which  place  he 
had  moved  from  Baltimore,  Md.,  in  1843,  was  president  of 
the  Connecticut  State  Board  of  Charities  from  1882  to 
1886,  represented  New  Haven  in  the  General  Assembly  of 
1 861  and  1863,  and  was  a  state  senator  in  1867,  1868,  and 
1889.  Frank  Gallagher's  mother  was  Miranda  Lucinda, 
daughter  of  Walter  Pease,  a  native  of  Enfield,  Conn.,  born 
in  1818,  of  an  old  and  much  esteemed  family  of  that  town. 

He  entered  Yale  in  1862,  taking  his  medical  degree  two 
years  later,  and  afterwards  practiced  in  New  Haven.  The 
greater  part  of  his  life  had,  however,  been  spent  in  the 
West,  principally  in  Oregon.  He  died  in  Newport,  that 
state,  on  March  25,  1916. 

Dr.  Gallagher  was  married  some  years  ago  to  Myra  Tut- 
tle,  but  was  later  separated  from  her.  They  had  one  daugh- 
ter. His  younger  brother,  John  Currier  Gallagher,  who 
died  in  1912,  graduated  from  the  Scientific  School  in  1879 
and  from  the  School  of  Law  in  188 1. 


Fenner  Harris  Peckham,  M.D.   1866 

Born  February  ii,  1844,  in  East  Killingly,  Conn. 
Died  December  25,  1915,  in  Providence,  R.  I. 

Fenner  Harris  Peckham  was  born  in  East  Killingly, 
Conn.,  February  11,  1844,  being  the  only  son  of  Fenner 
Harris  and  Catharine  Davis  (Torrey)  Peckham.  His 
father  was  the  son  of  Hazael  Peckham,  a  practicing  physi- 
cian, and  Susannah  (Thornton)  Peckham  and  a  descendant 


1864-1866  203 

of  John  Peckham,  who  came  to  America  from  England  in 
1638  and  settled  at  Newport,  R.  I.  A  graduate  of  the  Yale 
School  of  Medicine  in  1842,  he  practiced  in  East  Killingly 
until  1852  and  in  Providence,  R.  I.,  from  that  year  until  his 
death  in  1887;  he  was  a  surgeon  in  the  Third  Rhode  Island 
Heavy  Artillery  during  the  Civil  War.  His  wife,  whose 
parents  were  William  and  Zilpah  (Davison)  Torrey,  was 
descended  from  William  Torrey,  who  settled  in  Weymouth, 
Mass.,  in  1640,  having  emigrated  from  Combe  St.  Nicholas, 
England. 

The  son  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  Providence,  and 
after  leaving  the  Providence  High  School  in  1861,  served 
for  a  time  with  the  Union  Army  as  hospital  steward,  later 
becoming  a  lieutenant  in  the  Twelfth  Rhode  Island  Volun- 
teer Infantry.  He  took  up  the  study  of  medicine  at  Yale 
in  1864,  having  previously  studied  under  his  father. 
Returning  to  Providence  after  his  graduation,  he  became 
associated  with  the  latter,  and  after  his  death  continued  in 
practice  until  a  few  years  ago,  when  he  practically  retired, 
relinquishing  his  practice  to  his  eldest  son. 

Dr.  Peckham  had  not,  however,  confined  his  activities 
entirely  to  his  profession,  but  had  interested  himself  in 
many  movements  for  civic  betterment,  as  well  as  giving  his 
attention  to  a  number  of  business  projects.  From  January 
9,  1904,  to  November  16,  1904,  he  was  president  of  the 
Board  of  Park  Commissioners,  and  from  the  organization 
of  the  Metropolitan  Park  Commission  of  Rhode  Island  on 
the  latter  date  was  chairman  of  that  body  and  one  of  its 
most  ardent  champions.  Since  19 15,  he  had  been  president 
of  the  Public  Park  Association,  and  he  had  also  served  as 
state  commissioner  of  birds  from  Providence  County.  He 
was  president  of  the  Hope  Webbing  Company,  the  largest 
plant  of  its  kind  in  the  world,  vice  president  of  the  Provi- 
dence Telephone  Company,  a  director  of  the  Narragansett 
Electric  Lighting  Company,  the  Rhode  Island  Perkins 
Horseshoe  Company,  the  Mechanics  National  Bank,  the 
Freemasons  Hall  Company,  and  the  Wood  River  Branch 
Railway  Company,  and  a  trustee  of  the  Mechanics  Savings 
Bank.  He  was  a  member  of  St.  Stephen's  Protestant 
Episcopal  Church  of  Providence  and  of  the  Massachusetts 
Commandery  of  the  Military  Order  of  the  Loyal  Legion. 
He  belonged  to  the  Rhode  Island  Medical  Society  and  to 
the  American   Medical  Association,   and  had  served   as  a 


204  SCHOOL    OF    MEDICINE 

United  States  pension  examining  surgeon.  He  had  written 
somewhat  for  the  press. 

Dr.  Peckham's  death,  which  was  due  to  heart  trouble, 
occurred  at  his  home  in  Providence,  December  25,  191 5, 
after  an  illness  of  only  three  days.  He  was  buried  in  Swan 
Point  Cemetery,  that  city. 

He  was  married  October  29,  1867,  in  Providence,  to 
Mary  Helen,  daughter  of  Elam  Ward  and  Helen  (Fuller) 
Olney,  who  died  May  13,  1911.  On  January  9,  1913,  Dr. 
Peckham  was  married  a  second  time  in  ,  Providence  to 
Mary  Anna,  daughter  of  Francis  W.  and  Anna  D.  (Barney) 
Carpenter,  who  survives  her  husband.  He  also  leaves  his 
three  children  by  his  first  marriage, — Charles  Fenner,  who 
graduated  from  the  College  of  Physicians  and  Surgeons  at 
Columbia  in  1890  with  the  degree  of  M.D.,  Alice,  and 
Wilham  Torrey,  a  graduate  of  Brown  in  1897. 


George  Edward  Cragin,  M.D.   1867 

Born  January  7,  1840,  in  New  York  City 
Died  September  8,  1915,  in  Kenwood,  N.  Y. 

George  Edward  Cragin  was  born  in  New  York  City, 
January  7,  1840,  his  parents  being  George  Cragin,  at  one 
time  editor  of  Moral  Reform,  and  Mary  Elizabeth  (John- 
son) Cragin.  His  great-grandfather,  Amos  Cragin,  was 
killed  at  the  battle  of  Ticonderoga  in  1758.  His  paternal 
grandfather  was  Benjamin  Cragin,  who  served  as  justice 
of  the  peace  in  Douglass,  Mass.,  and  represented  his  dis- 
trict in  the  Massachusetts  Legislature  for  about  forty  years. 
His  mother  was  the  daughter  of  Daniel  and  Mary  G. 
Johnson. 

He  received  his  early  education  at  Kenwood,  N.  Y.,  and 
before  entering  the  Yale  School  of  Medicine  in  1864,  was 
engaged  in  farming  and  manufacturing. 

After  taking  his  degree  in  1867,  he  became  connected 
with  the  Oneida  Community,  Ltd.,  at  Kenwood,  with  which 
he  continued  until  his  retirement  in  1911.  Until  about 
1886,  he  attended  to  the  medical  practice  of  the  Community, 
but  since  that  time  "had  taken  no  cases.  Although  in  failing 
strength  the  last  five  years  of  his  life,  Dr.  Cragin  was  very 
active  intellectually,  giving  much  of  his  attention  to  writing. 


1866-I885  205 

When  sixty-eight  years  of  age,  he  took  up  oil  painting,  and 
left  a  number  of  pictures. 

Dr.  Cragin  became  ill  with  acute  indigestion  at  his  home 
in  Kenwood  on  the  afternoon  of  September  8,  191 5,  and 
died  at  midnight,  his  death  being  due  to  angina  pectoris. 
He  was  buried  in  the  local  cemetery. 

His  marriage  took  place  on  October  25,  1879,  in  Ken- 
wood to  Carrie  M.,  daughter  of  Rev.  Lorenzo  Bolles,  Jr., 
of  Hopkinton,  Mass.,  who  served  as  chaplain  of  the 
Twenty-first  Iowa  Regiment  during  the  Civil  War,  and 
Rachel  M.  (Crossman)  Bolles,  who  survives  him.  They 
had  two  children,  Edward  Trowbridge,  who  died  in  infancy, 
and  Jessie,  now  Mrs.  John  Newton  Milnes  of  Espy,  Pa. 
One  of  his  brothers,  John  Holton  Cragin,  attended  the 
Sheffield  Scientific  School  during  1867-68,  while  the  other, 
Charles  Adams  Cragin,  received  the  degree  of  Ph.B.  at 
Yale  in  1873. 


Charles  Frederick  Dibble,  M.D.   1885 

Born  May  22,  1859,  in  New  Haven.  Conn. 
Died  July  21,  1915,  in  Guilford,  Conn. 

Charles  Frederick  Dibble  was  born  May  22,  1859,  i"  New 
Haven,  Conn.,  his  parents  being  Charles  Ferdinand  Dibble, 
a  carriage  manufacturer  of  that  city,  who  served  as  com- 
missary with  the  Fourteenth  Connecticut  Regiment  during 
the  Civil  War,  and  Axia  Elmina  (Fields)  Dibble.  He 
received  his  early  education  at  the  Episcopal  Academy  at 
Cheshire,  Conn.,  and  before  entering  Yale  in  1882  worked 
for  a  time  in  the  carriage  shop  of  Mr.  Townsend  in  New 
Haven. 

"  He  took  his  medical  degree  in  1885,  and  for  the  next  five 
years  practiced  in  New  Haven.  He  then  moved  to  Clare- 
mont,  Va.,  where  he  followed  his  profession  until  1905. 
At  that  time,  he  gave  up  active  practice  on  account  of  poor 
health*  and  he  had  since  lived  in  Guilford,  Conn.,  where  he 
died  July  21,  191 5,  after  a  short  illness.  Burial  was  in 
Nut  Plains  Cemetery,  Guilford. 

He  was  married  in  New  Haven,  July  i,  1885,  to  Ella 
Emily,  daughter  of  Elv  Malvin  and  Lucy  Munro  (Daniels) 
Wing  and  widow  of  Henry  M.  Sanderson.      She  survives 


2o6  SCHOOL   OF    MEDICINE 

him  with  their  son,  Charles  Frederick,  Jr.  Dr.  Dibble  was 
the  nephew  of  Frederic  Levi  Dibble  (M.D.  1859),  who 
went  to  the  front  in  the  Civil  War  as  a  surgeon. 


William  Harvey  Stowe,  M.D.   1888 

Born  August  10,  1842,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  August  11,  1915,  in  South  Norwalk,  Conn. 

William  Harvey  Stowe  was  the  son  of  Harvey  and  Sarah 
(Lees)  Stowe,  and  was  born  August  10,  1842,  in  New 
Haven,  Conn.  He  was  of  an  old  English  family,  the 
pioneer  ancestor  of  the  American  branch  being  John  Stowe 
of  Hawkhurst,  Kent,  who  came  on  the  ship  Elizabeth  in 
1635  and  settled  at  Roxbury,  Mass. 

His  early  education  was  received  in  General  Russell's 
Collegiate  and  Commercial  Institute  in  New  Haven,  and  he 
had  passed  his  entrance  examinations  for  Yale,  intending 
to  enter  with  the  College  Class  of  1865,  but  in  September, 
1861,  enlisted  instead  in  the  Sixth  Connecticut  Infantry  as 
a  first  lieutenant.  In  1868,  he  accepted  a  position  as  teacher 
in  commercial  and  mathematical  branches  and  Latin,  and 
as  military  instructor,  at  General  Russell's  school,  where  he 
remained  until  June,  1885.  He  then  conducted  for  three 
years  a  school  of  his  own  in  New  Haven,  under  the  name 
of  the  Collegiate  and  Commercial  Institute.  In  1886,  he 
took  up  the  study  of  medicine  at  Yale,  receiving  the  degree 
of  M.D.  with  honors  in  1888  and  spending  the  following 
year  in  graduate  work. 

He  began  practice  at  Cross  River,  N.  Y.,  in  1895,  serving 
in  1900  and  1901  as  superintendent  of  the  Sunday  school  of 
the  Presbyterian  Church  at  South  Salem,  N.  Y.  In  the 
spring  of  1908,  he  moved  to  South  Norwalk,  Conn.,  and 
followed  his  profession  in  that  place  until  his  sudden  death, 
fiom  apoplexy,  August  11,  1915.  He  was  buried  in  River- 
side Cemetery  at  South  Norwalk. 

Dr.  Stowe  became  affiliated  with  the  South  N'orwalk 
Congregational  Church  upon  his  arrival  in  that  town,  and 
was  one  of  the  most  active  and  energetic  workers  in  the 
congregation,  being  a  deacon  from  October,  191 3,  until  his 
death.  In  1909,  he  was  appointed  secretary  and  treasurer 
of  the  Norwalk  Medical  Association,  and  he  had  also  been 


1885-1905  '  207 

a  member  of  the  New  York  and  Connecticut  State  Military 
Examining  Boards,  and  belonged  to  the  American  Medical 
Society. 

He  was  married  August  3,  1869,  in  New  Haven  to  Ellen 
Frances,  daughter  of  Edward  Swain  and  Sarah  Ann 
(Bates)  Read.  She  died  in  May,  1892,  and  on  May  2, 
1900,  his  second  marriage  took  place  in  Bedford,  N.  Y.,  to 
Caroline  Avery,  daughter  of  Harvey  W.  and  Caroline 
Reynolds.  Dr.  Stowe  had  five  children  by  his  first  mar- 
riage: Sarah  Read  (Mrs.  Franklin  Everett  Weaver  of 
Waterbury,  Conn.)  ;  Edward  Benjamin,  who  died  May  30, 
1886;  Eric  Lees;  WiUiam  Davenport,  and  Dorothea  Olive, 
the  wife  of  Mr.  John  Cully  of  Meriden,  Conn.  His  grand- 
son, Hobart  Stowe  Weaver,  graduated  from  the  College  in 
1916,  and  other  relatives  are  Edwin  Starr  Pickett  (B.A. 
1899,  LL.B.  1901),  and  Ralph  M.  Read,  a  graduate  of  the 
Scientific  School  in  1912. 


Frank  Atwater  Elmes,  M.D.   1905 

Born  November  27,  1879,  in  Derby,  Conn. 
Died  May  21,  1916,  in  Derby,  Conn. 

Frank  Atwater  Elmes,  son  of  William  Forbes  and  Kath- 
erine  (Vincent)  Elmes,  was  born  November  27,  1879,  in 
Derby,  Conn.  His  father  was  the  son  of  Thomas  and  Lucy 
Root  (Atwater)  Elmes  and  the  great-grandson  of  Charles 
Atwater,  who  established  a  scholarship  at  Yale.  Among 
his  ancestors  were  David  Atwater,  one  of  the  first  planters 
of  New  Haven  Colony,  Lieut.  Elisha  Root,  an  officer  in  the 
Revolution,  and  Col.  William  Curtiss.  Members  of  the 
Root  family  came  to  this  country  because  they  would  not 
fight  under  -Cromwell,  and  were  among  the  settlers  of 
Farmington,  Conn.,  in  1640. 

Entering  Yale  from  the  Derby  High  School  as  a  member 
of  the  College  Class  of  1902,  Frank  Elmes  withdrew  early 
in  1900,  and  went  to  South  Africa.  On  his  arrival  there, 
he  enlisted  in  the  English  Mounted  Infantry  for  service  in 
the  Boer  War.  He  was  wounded  twice,  and  had  fever,  and 
as  a  result,  was  invalided  home  with  a  pension  and  a  medal 
at  the  end  of  a  year.  He  entered  the  Yale  School  of  Medi- 
cine in  1901,  taking  his  degree  four  years  later.     In  Senior 


2o8  SCHOOL    OF    MEDICINE 

year,  he  was  president  of  his  Class,  of  which  he  had  been 
Secretary  since  graduation. 

After  serving  ^s  an  interne  at  the  New  Haven  Hospital 
for  about  eighteen  months  after  taking  his  degree,  he  went 
abroad  for  further  study  in  Rome,  Berlin,  and  London. 
Returning  to  this  country  in  1908,  he  settled  in  his  native 
town,  where  he  had  since  devoted  his  attention  to  surgery. 
For  about  two  years,  he  was  associated  with  Charles  T. 
Baldwin  (M.D.  New  York  University  1883),  but  since  1910 
had  practiced  alone. 

Dr.  Elmes  served  as  attending  surgeon  to  Griffin  Hos- 
pital, Derby,  for  two  months  each  year,  as  health  officer  of 
Derby  for  two  years,  and  as  medical  inspector  of  its  public 
schools  for  a  similar  period.  He  had  written  several  arti- 
cles for  medical  journals  on  subjects  connected  with  health 
and  school  inspection.  He  was  a  Roman  Catholic,  being  a 
communicant  of  St.  Mary's  Church  of  Derby.  He  was  a 
member  of  the  American  Medical  Association,  the  Con- 
necticut Medical  Society,  the  New  Haven  County  and  City 
Medical  societies,  and  at  one  time  served  as  vice  president 
of  the  School  of  Medicine  Alumni  Association. 

His  death  occurred  suddenly  at  his  home  in  Derby  on 
May  21,  1916,  and  he  was  buried  in  Grove  Street  Cemetery, 
New  Haven.  Dr.  Elmes  was  unmarried.  In  addition  to 
his  brother,  Thomas,  who  graduated  from  the  Scientific 
School  in  1906  and  from  the  School  of  Law  in  191 1,  he  is 
survived  by  his  parents.  A  number  of  relatives  have 
attended  Yale. 


John  Charles  Malony,  M.D.   1910 

Born  August  26,  1886,  in  Lakemont,  N.  Y. 
Died  August  i,  191 5,  in  Dundee,  N.  Y. 

John  Charles  Malony  was  born  August  26,  1886,  in 
Lakemont,  N.  Y.,  his  parents  being  Dr.  John  Montgomery 
Malony  and  Josephine  (Huson)  Malony.  His  father,  who 
received  the  degree  of  M.D.  from  Georgetown  University 
in  1870,  has  been  for  many  years  engaged  in  practice  as  a 
physician  and  surgeon  in  Dundee,  N.  Y.,  where  he  served 
as  health  officer  and  coroner  from  1886  to  1905.  His 
mother  is  the  daughter  of  William  H.  and  Mary  E.  (Reed) 


1905-1910  209 

Huson.  After  graduating  from  the  Dundee  High  School, 
the  son  entered  the  Yale  School  of  Medicine  in  1905,  but 
was  compelled  to  withdraw  in  his  first  year  on  account  of 
illness.  He  returned  in  1906,  and  completed  his  work  in 
1910.  He  served  as  an  associate  editor  of  the  year  book 
issued  by  his  Class  in  its  Senior  year. 

After  spending  the  two  years  following  his  graduation  as 
an  interne  at  the  Hospital  of  St.  Raphael  in  New  Haven,  he 
returned  to  Dundee,  where  he  had  since  practiced.  His 
death  was  due  to  a  sudden  attack  of  heart  trouble,  and 
occurred  August  i,  19 15,  at  his  home  in  that  town.  He 
was  buried  in  Hillside  Cemetery,  Dundee. 

On  December  25,  19 12,  Dr.  Malony  was  married  in 
Rochester,  N.  Y.,  to  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  D.  E.  and  N. 
Helen  (Goble)  Beam,  who  survives  him  with  their  infant 
daughter,  Helen  Elizabeth.  Besides  his  parents  and  three 
sisters,  he  leaves  three  brothers :  William  Redfield  Proctor 
Malony  (B.A.  1900,  LL.B.  Georgetown  1903,  M.L.  George- 
town 1904)  ;  Frederick  Fletcher  Malony,  who  received  the 
degree  of  M.D.  at  Yale  in  1901,  and  Harry  James  Malony, 
a  non-graduate  member  of  the  College  Class  of  191 1,  who 
graduated  from  West  Point  in  19 12. 


SCHOOL   OF   LAW 


SCHOOL  OF  LAW 
Alexander  John  Robert,  LL.B.   185 1 

Born  October  2,  1828,  near  Robertsville,  S.  C. 
Died  September  17,  1915,  in  Grass  Valley,  Cal. 

Alexander  John  Robert  was  born  October  2,  1828,  on  a 
plantation  near  Robertsville,  S.  C,  being  one  of  the  thirteen 
children  of  James  Jehu  Robert  and  a  descendant  of  Pierre 
Robert,  the  physician  and  preacher  of  the  colony  of  Hugue- 
nots who  settled  in  South  Carolina,  and  of  Landgrave 
Thomas  Smith,  at  one  time  governor  of  that  state.  His 
mother  was  Phoebe  Miranda,  daughter  of  Capt.  Patrick 
McKenzie,  of  the  English  Navy,  and  Esther  (Moss) 
McKenzie,  the  latter  being  the  daughter  of  Dr.  George 
Moss. 

In  1849,  h^  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  from  Brown 
University.  Before  entering  that  institution,  he  had  studied 
at  Denison  University  in  Granville,  Ohio.  He  came  to  New 
Haven  in  January,  1850,  and  was  graduated  from  the  Yale 
School  of  Law  the  following  year. 

Shortly  afterwards,  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar  at  Mari- 
etta, Ga.,  but  practiced  his  profession  for  only  a  short 
time,  giving  his  attention  instead  to  his  plantation.  He  was 
colonel  of  the  Seventy-eighth  Regiment  of  Georgia  State 
Troops,  and  at  the  beginning  of  the  Civil  War,  enlisted  in 
the  Confederate  Army,  as  a  private  in  Company  E,  Fourth 
Georgia  Volunteers.  He  was  promoted  to  the  rank  of  first 
lieutenant,  and  later  became  adjutant,  serving  in  the  latter 
capacity  from  1862  to  1865.  From  1871  to  1876,  he  held 
the  position  of  principal  of  the  Masonic  Literary  Institute 
at  Ringgold,  Ga.,  and  during  the  next  two  years  was  head 
of  the  Sam  Houston  Institute  at  Jasper,  Tenn.  In  1878, 
he  was  chosen  president  of  the  Corsicana  (Texas)  Female 
College,  and  filled  that  office  until  1882,  when  he  became 
president  of  Andover  College  at  Huntsville,  Texas.  He 
was  then  for  some  years  engaged  in  manufacturing  at  Hills- 
boro,  Texas,  later  being  superintendent  successively  of  the 
schools  of  Colorado,  Texas,  and  of  those  of  Comanche, 
Longview,  Hillsboro,  and  Pottsboro,  in  the  same  state,  and 


185I-1856  211 

of  Marietta,  Indian  Territory.  After  serving  for  a  time  as 
president  of  Cree  Female  College  at  Tishomingo,  in  that 
territory,  he  removed,  in  April,  1906,  to  Spokane,  Wash., 
and  there  took  up  truck  farming  and  poultry  culture. 

Seven  years  later,  he  v^ent  to  Davis,  Cal.,  but  a  few 
months  afterwards  left  that  town  for  Grass  Valley,  Cal., 
where  he  died  September  17,  191 5,  after  a  brief  illness  fol- 
lowing a  general  breakdown  in  health.  Burial  was  in  Elm 
Ridge  Cemetery  at  Grass  Valley.  Mr.  Robert  had  served 
as  a  vestryman  and  warden  in  the  Protestant  Episcopal 
Church. 

He  was  married  on  October  18,  1863,  in  LaGrange, 
Ga.,  to  May  Virginia,  daughter  of  Wiley  Hartsfield  Simms. 
Mrs.  Robert,  who  graduated  from  the  Southern  Female 
College  in  1861,  survives  her  husband.  Five  children  were 
born  to  them :  Addie  Sterling,  a  graduate  of  Baylor  Female 
Seminary  in  1887;  Alexander  Beale;  Margaret  May,  who 
is  the  wife  of  Frank  E.  Geathard  of  Spokane,  Wash. ;  Pierre 
Joseph,  and  Emily  Lee.  Mr.  Robert  was  a  brother  of 
Joseph  Thomas  Robert  (B.A.  Brown  1828,  M.D.  Medical 
College  of  the  State  of  South  Carolina  1831,  LL.D.  Denison 
1869),  who  studied  in  the  Yale  School  of  Medicine  during 
1829-30;  James  Lawrence  Robert,  a  graduate  of  the  Georgia 
Medical  College  in  1854;  William  Henry  Robert,  who  was 
educated  at  South  Carolina  College ;  Milton  George  Robert 
(B.A.  Brown  1847)  ;  Francis  Wayland  Robert,  a  non- 
graduate  member  of  the  Class  of  185 1  at  Brown,  who 
received  the  degree  of  LL.B.  at  Yale  in  185 1 ;  Stoney  Jehu 
Robert,  who  studied  at  Brown  University  and  later  received 
the  degree  of  M.D.  from  the  Georgia  Medical  College,  and 
of  Benjamin  Franklin  Robert,  a  student  at  Brown  from 
1853  to  1856. 


Oliver  Perry  Shiras,  LL.B.   1856 

Born  October  22,  1833,  in  Pittsburgh,  Pa. 
Died  January  7,  1916,  in  Seabreeze,  Fla. 

Oliver  Perry  Shiras,  one  of  the  four  sons  of  George  and 
Eliza  (Herron)  Shiras,  was  born  in  Pittsburgh,  Pa.,  Octo- 
ber 22,  1833.  His  mother  was  the  daughter  of  Rev.  Francis 
Herron  and  Elizabeth    (Blaine)    Herron.     He   studied   at 


212  SCHOOL    OF    LAW 

the  Western  University  of  Pennsylvania  (University  of 
Pittsburgh)  for  some  time,  and  in  1853  received  the  degree 
of  B.A.  from  Ohio  University  at  Athens,  where  he  spent 
four  years.  He  then  came  to  Yale,  and,  after  some  time  in 
the  Department  of  Philosophy,  in  1854  took  up  the  study 
of  law,  being  graduated  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of 
Laws  in  1856. 

In  that  year,  Mr.  Shiras  was  admitted  to  the  Iowa  Bar, 
and  practiced  in  Dubuque  until  1882,  when  he  was 
appointed  United  States  district  judge  for  the  northern 
district  of  Iowa.  He  served  in  that  capacity  until  his 
retirement  in  November,  1903.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
American  Bar  Association  and  the  author  of  "Equity  Prac- 
tice in  the  United  States  Courts."  In  1886,  Yale  conferred 
the  honorary  degree  of  LL.D.  upon  him,  and  eighteen  years 
afterwards  he  received  a  similar  degree  from  Ohio  Uni- 
versity. He  served  with  the  Union  Army  from  August, 
1862,  until  November,  1864,  as  a  first  lieutenant  in  the 
Twenty-seventh  Iowa  Infantry. 

His  death  occurred,  after  an  operation,  January  7,  1916, 
at  Seabreeze,  Fla.  His  body  was  taken  to  Dubuque  for 
burial. 

He  was  married  in  Springfield,  Ohio,  February  28,  1857, 
to  Elizabeth  Ruth,  daughter  of  Nathaniel  Mitchell.  She 
died  August  11,  1885.  They  had  four  children:  Isabella 
H.,  who  married  Mr.  Irving  VanVliet  in  1891 ;  Eliza  H. 
(died  January  27,  1863)  ;  Anna  D.,  who  died  in  infancy, 
and  Frederick  D.,  whose  death  occurred  June  11,  1908. 
On  October  11,  1888,  Mr.  Shiras  was  married  in  St.  Paul, 
Minn.,  to  Mrs.  Hetty  E.  Cornwall,  who  survives  him  with 
his  eldest  daughter.  His  brother,  George  Shiras,  Jr.,  grad- 
uated from  the  College  in  1853,  receiving  an  honorary 
LL.D.  in  1883.  The  latter's  sons  are  George  Shiras,  3d, 
who  attended  Cornell  from  1877  to  1881,  graduating  from 
the  Yale  School  of  Law  in  1883,  and  Winfield  Kennedy 
Shiras  (LL.B.  1884),  who  studied  at  Cornell  for  four  years 
before  coming  to  Yale. 


1856-1872  213 


Frank  AUyn  Robinson,  LL.B.   1872 

Born  August  3,  185 1,  in  Norwich,  Conn. 
Died  December  25,  191 5,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 

Frank  Allyn  Robinson,  son  of  John  Adams  and  Mary 
Elizabeth  (Callyhan)  Robinson,  was  born  August  3,  1851, 
in  Norwich,  Conn.  His  parents  removed  to  New  London, 
Conn.,  when  he  was  nine  years  of  age,  and  he  received  his 
preparatory  training  at  the  Bartlett  School  (now  known  as 
the  Bulkeley  High  School)  in  that  city.  He  entered  the 
Yale  School  of  Law  in  1870. 

In  1872,  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  New  Haven,  where 
he  practiced  for  six  years  in  association  with  his  brother, 
William.  He  returned  to  Norwich  in  1878,  and  since  1879 
had  been  engaged  in  the  publication  of  legal  blanks  there. 
In  politics  he  was  a  Republican,  and  for  two  years,  begin- 
ning in  1906,  he  served  as  an  alderman.  Throughout  his 
residence  in  Norwich,  he  had  taken  an  active  part  in  the 
work  of  Christ  Protestant  Episcopal  Church,  of  which  at 
the  time  of  his  death  he  was  junior  warden. 

He  died  December  25,  191 5,  from  valvular  heart  trouble, 
after  a  brief  illness,  in  Grace  Hospital,  New  Haven,  Conn., 
where  he  had  gone  for  treatment.  Burial  was  in  Yantic 
Cemetery  in  Norwich. 

Mr.  Robinson  was  married  October  18,  1877,  in  New 
Haven  to  Elizabeth  Clarissa,  daughter  of  John  Burgis  and 
Lucretia  Coan  (Bartlett)  Kirby,  who  survives  him  with 
two  daughters,  Louise  and  Helen.  Their  oldest  child,  Allyn 
Kirby,  died  in  infancy.  Mr.  Robinson  was  a  brother  of 
John  Adams  Robinson  (B.S.  Dartmouth  1855,  M.D. 
Columbia  1858,  LL.B.  Yale  1871)  and  of  William  Callyhan 
Robinson,  a  graduate  of  Dartmouth  in  1854,  who  received 
an  LL.D.  there  in  1879  and  an  honorary  M.A.  from  Yale 
in  1881.  Three  nephews,  Philip  N.  Robinson  (LL.B. 
1886);  George  W.  Robinson  (LL.B.  1888),  and  Paul  S. 
Robinson  (Ph.B.  1889,  M.D.  1891),  and  a  grandnephew, 
Elliott  S.  Robinson  (B.A.  1916),  also  graduated  from  Yale. 


214  SCHOOL   OF   LAW 


George  Arnold  Tyler,  LL.B.   1876 

Born  August  12,  1847,  in  Haddam,  Conn. 
Died  October  11,  1915,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 

George  Arnold  Tyler  was  born  in  Haddam,  Conn., 
August  12,  1847,  the  son  of  Rev.  Daniel  Melvin  Tyler,  a 
Methodist  clergyman,  and  Dolly  (Shailer)  Tyler.  Before 
entering  the  Yale  School  of  Law  in  1874,  he  studied  at 
Wesleyan  Academy,  Wilbraham,  Mass.,  and  at  the  Hart- 
ford  (Conn.)    Business  College. 

Since  his  admission  to  the  Connecticut  Bar  shortly  after 
his  graduation  in  1876,  Mr.  Tyler  had  practiced  law  in 
New  Haven.  His  death  occurred  at  his  home  in  that 
city  on  October  11,  1915,  after  a  prolonged  illness  due 
to  heart  trouble.  Burial  was  in  Oak  Grove  Cemetery, 
West  Haven. 

He  was  married  on  November  6,  1872,  in  Middletown, 
Conn.,  to  Magdalena  Y.,  daughter  of  Henry  S.  and  Angel- 
ica (Meigs)  North.  She  survives  him  with  a  daughter, 
Carolyn  North,  the  wife  of  Robert  Stanley  Kearney  (LL.B. 
1901)  of  East  Orange,  N.  J. 


Justus  Street  Hotchkiss,  LL.B.   1877 

Born  February  4,  1831,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  November  12,  1915,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 

Justus  Street  Hotchkiss,  son  of  Lucius  Hotchkiss,  a 
wholesale  lumber  merchant,  of  the  firm  of  H.  &  L.  Hotch- 
kiss, and  Maria  Melcher  (Street)  Hotchkiss,  was  born 
February  4,  183 1,  in  New  Haven,  Conn.  Through  his 
father,  whose  parents  were  Justus  and  Susanna  Hotchkiss, 
he  was  descended  from  Samuel  Hotchkiss,  who  came  to 
this  country  from  England  in  the  seventeenth  century,  set- 
tling in  New  Haven  before  1678.  Justus  Hotchkiss  died  in 
1 81 2,  and  his  estate  was  the  largest  up  to  that  time  probated 
in  that  town.  The  mother  of  Justus  S.  Hotchkiss  was  the 
daughter  of  Justin  Washington  and  Anne  (Whidden) 
Street  and  a  descendant  of  Rev.  Nicholas  Street,  a  gradu- 
ate   of    Oxford    University    in    1625,    who    emigrated    to 


1876-1877  2«5 

America  from  Bridgewater  and  settled  at  Taunton,  Mass. 
He  was  minister  successively  at  Taunton  and  New  Haven, 
serving  the  First  Church  in  New  Haven  from  1659  till  his 
death  in  1674.  In  the  line  of  descent  from  him  to  Justus 
S.  Hotchkiss  were  his  son.  Rev.  Samuel  Street  (B.A.  Har- 
vard 1664),  minister  at  Wallingford,  Conn.,  and  the  latter's 
great-grandson.  Rev.  Nicholas  Street,  a  graduate  of  Yale 
in  1 75 1,  minister  at  East  Haven,  Conn.,  for  fifty-one  years 
(1755-1806). 

Justus  S.  Hotchkiss  received  his  early  education  in  the 
school  of  Stiles  French  (B.A,  1827)  in  New  Haven,  where 
he  was  prepared  for  college.  Preferring  to  enter  immedi- 
ately into  his  father's  business,  he  did  so  at  the  age  of 
sixteen.  He  pursued  the  lumber  trade  in  New  Haven  for 
about  twenty-six  years,  during  the  latter  part  of  which  he 
was  in  partnership  with  Andrew  W.  DeForest.  He  had 
then  acquired  an  independent  fortune,  and  retired  from  all 
active  business.  After  two  or  three  years,  he  took  up  the 
study  of  law,  as  a  literary  pursuit,  and  attended  courses  on 
several  subjects  at  the  Yale  School  of  Law,  in  the  years 
1875-76  and  1876-77,  but  without  taking  examinations  for 
a  degree.  In  1878,  he  became  a  member  of  the  Society's 
Committee  of  the  First  Church  (Congregational)  in  New 
Haven,  and  held  that  office  for  thirty-eight  years,  during 
the  latter  portion  of  which  time  he  was  its  chairman.  He 
was  also  for  many  years  superintendent  of  the  mission 
Sunday  school  of  that  church  in  Highwood.  He  was 
elected  a  director  of  the  Second  National  Bank  of  New 
Haven  in  1880, — an  office  which  he  continued  to  fill  until  his 
death.  He  was  also  a  director  of  the  Boston  &  New  York 
Air  Line  Railroad  Company  during  the  later  years  of  its 
existence,  before  its  absorption  in  the  New  York,  New 
Haven  &  Hartford  Railroad  Company,  being  first  elected 
in  1902. 

In  1888,  he  prepared  a  paper  which  he  read  before  the 
New  Haven  Colony  Historical  Society,  on  *'New  Haven 
Bells."  This  is  printed  in  the  Papers  of  the  Society,  Vol- 
ume V,  page  173.  Mr.  Hotchkiss  made  several  visits  to 
Europe,  and  traveled  extensively  there.  The  first  of  these 
he  made  in  company  with  Alfred  H.  Terry  (LL.B.  1849, 
Honorary  M.A.  1865),  then  an  officer  in  the  Connecticut 
Militia  and  afterwards  major  general  in  the  United  States 
Army.     Thpy  took  pains  to  examine  some  of  the  great  battle- 


2l6  SCHOOL    OF   LAW 

fields  of  the  Napoleonic  Wars,  and  Colonel  Terry  made  a 
careful  study  of  them. 

In  1893,  the  degree  of  LL.B.  was  conferred  upon  Mr. 
Hotchkiss  by  Yale  University,  as  of  the  Class  of  1877,  with 
which  he  had  pursued  his  legal  studies. 

His  death  occurred  November  12,  191 5,  at  his  home  in 
New  Haven,  after  an  illness  of  several  months  due  to  apo- 
plexy. He  was  buried  in  Grove  Street  Cemetery  in  that 
city.  By  his  will,  large  bequests  were  made  to  the  New 
Haven  Hospital  and  the  First  Church  of  New  Haven,  and 
lesser  ones  to  other  charities.  Yale  University  was  made 
residuary  legatee.  What  it  receives  is  to  be  kept  as  a 
permanent  fund,  and  will  probably  amount  to  as  much  as 
$900,000. 

He  was  married  in  New  Haven,  May  9,  1866,  to  Fanny, 
daughter  of  Edmund  and  Harriet  (Mears)  Winchester  of 
Boston,  Mass.,  by  whom  he  had  one  daughter,  Fanny 
Winchester,  who  died  shortly  after  birth.  Mrs.  Hotchkiss 
was  the  author  of  the  volume  of  family  genealogy  entitled 
"Winchester  Notes."  She  died  January  24,  1912.  Mr. 
Hotchkiss  was  a  cousin  of  Henry  Hotchkiss  Townshend 
(B.A.  1897,  LL.B.  1901),  and  of  H.  Stuart  Hotchkiss  and 
Raynham  Townshend,  both  of  whom  graduated  from  the 
Scientific  School  in  1900,  the  latter  being  also  a  graduate  of 
the  College  of  Physicians  and  Surgeons  at  Columbia  in 
1905. 


Edward  Franklin  Meeker,  LL.B.   1877 

Born  March  26,  1853,  in  Bridgeport,  Conn. 
Died  November  17,  1915,  in  Bridgeport,  Conn. 

Edward  Franklin  Meeker  was  born  March  26,  1853,  in 
Bridgeport,  Conn.,  the  son  of  Edwin  Meeker,  a  merchant, 
and  Abby  (Hull)  Meeker.  In  1640,  the  first  member  of 
his  family  to  settle  in  this  country  came  from  England,  and 
joined  the  New  Haven  Colony.  His  great-grandfather, 
Benjamin  Meeker,  fought  in  the  Revolutionary  War,  and 
was  taken  prisoner,  being  confined  to  Sugar  House  prison 
for  a  year  and  a  half. 

He  received  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  of 
Bridgeport  and  in  the  school  of  Rev.  Guy  B.^  Day   (B.A, 


1877  21.7 

1845)  ^ri  that  city.  Before  entering  the  Yale  School  of 
Law  in  1875,  he  spent  several  years  in  learning  carriage- 
making,  and  had  also  served  as  clerk  and  deputy  collector 
of  internal  revenue  for  that  city.  He  was  president  of 
his  Class  at  Yale. 

After  his  graduation,  Mr.  Meeker  continued  for  two 
years  as  deputy  collector  of  revenue  in  Bridgeport,  but  in 
April,  1879,  went  to  New  York  City,  where  he  was  admitted 
to  the  bar.  Returning  to  his  native  town  in  1881,  he  prac- 
ticed there  for  the  next  two  years.  In  1883,  he  entered 
the  employ  of  the  Naugatuck  Railroad  as  general  account- 
ant and  paymaster,  but  in  1886  accepted  an  appointment 
from  President  Cleveland  as  postmaster  of  Bridgeport. 
He  served  in-that  capacity  for  three  years,  after  which  he 
was  engaged  in  manufacturing  until  1895,  when  he  resumed 
the  practice  of  law.  From  1885  to  1887,  he  served  as  clerk 
of  the  Board  of  Common  Council  of  Bridgeport,  and  for 
two  years  he  was  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Assessors. 
Mr.  Meeker  belonged  to  the  Society  of  the  Sons  of  the 
Revolution,  and'  was  a  member  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal 
Church,  being  a  communicant  of  Trinity  Church,  Bridge- 
port. 

He  died  at  his  home  in  that  city,  November  17,  191 5,  and 
was  buried  in  Mountain  Grove  Cemetery.  His  death  fol- 
lowed a  long  illness  due  to  myocarditis. 

He  married  in  Hartford,  Conn.,  April  18,  1888,  Lucy 
Maria,  daughter  of  Samuel  Finley  Jones,  a  non-gradu- 
ate member  of  the  Wesleyan  Class  of  1847,  and  Lucy  M. 
(Wilcox)  Jones  and  a  sister  of  Samuel  F.  Jones,  who  was 
a  member  of  the  College  Class  of  1875,  but  did  not 
graduate.  She  survives  him  with  their  son,  James  Edward 
(B.A.  1913,  M.A.  1915). 


William  Joseph  Mills,  LL.B.   1877 

Born  January  11,  1849,  in  Yazoo  City,  Miss. 
Died  December  24,  1915,  in  East  Las  Vegas,  N.  Alex. 

William  Joseph  Mills  was  born  in  Yazoo  City,  Miss., 
January  11,  1849,  the  son  of  William  Mills,  of  Louisa, 
Va.,  whose  parents  were  William  and  Elizabeth  (Gardiner) 
Mills  and  who  took  the  degree  of  M.D.  at  the  University 


2l8  SCHOOL   OF   LAW 

of  Pennsylvania  in  1832.  His  mother  was  Harriet,  daugh- 
ter of  Joseph  and  Margaret  (McDowell)  Beale;  her 
maternal  ancestors  came  from  the  north  of  Ireland  in  1757, 
settling  in  Chester  County,  Pennsylvania.  Two  years  after 
the  death  of  his  father  in  1853,  Mrs.  Mills  was  married 
to  William  Henry  Law  (B.A.  1822). 

William  J.  Mills  spent  his  youth  at  Norwich,  Conn., 
receiving  his  early  education  at  the  Norwich  Free  Acad- 
emy. Before  entering  the  Yale  School  of  Law  in  1875, 
he  was  employed  as  a  clerk  by  the  New  York  firm  of 
Grinnell,  Whitman  &  Company.  He  won  the  Jewell  prize 
in  his  first  year  at  Yale. 

He  was  admitted  to  the  Connecticut  Bar  in  1877,  and 
until  1886  practiced  law  in  New  Haven.  In- 1878,  he  was 
elected  to  the  Connecticut  House  of  Representatives,  and 
from  1880  to  1882  served  as  a  state  senator.  He  went 
to  New  Mexico  in  1886,  and,  with  the  exception  of  the 
four  years  from  1894  to  1898,  which  he  spent  in  practice  in 
New  Haven,  had  lived  at  East  Las  Vegas  ever  since.  In 
January,  1898,  he  received  appointment  as  chief  justice 
of  the  Supreme  Court  of  New  Mexico,  and  served  in  that 
capacity  until  February,  1910,  when  he  resigned  to  become 
territorial  governor  of  New  Mexico,  an  office  to  which 
he  had  been  appointed  by  President  Taft. 

On  the  admission  of  New  Mexico  into  the  Union,  Mr. 
Mills  resumed  the  practice  of  his  profession  at  Las  Vegas, 
continuing  until  his  death,  which  occurred  at  his  home, 
December  24,  191 5,  after  an  illness  of  several  weeks  due 
to  bronchial  pneumonia.  The  direct  cause  of  his  death  was 
heart  failure.  Burial  was  in  the  Masonic  Cemetery  at 
Las  Vegas. 

He  was  a  member  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal  Church, 
and  had  served  as  a  vestryman  of  Trinity  Church,  New 
Haven,  and  as  senior  warden  of  St.  Paul's  Memorial 
Church  at  East  Las  Vegas.  He  was  elected  president  of 
the  Yale  Alumni  Association  of  New  Mexico  at  its  organi- 
zation meeting  in  March,  191 5. 

He  was  married  January  14,  1885,  in  West  Haven,  Conn., 
to  Alice,  daughter  of  Wilson  and  Emma  (Hobrough) 
Waddingham.  Three  children  were  born  to  them:  Wil- 
son Waddingham,  who  received  the  degree  of  Ph.B.  at 
Yale  in  1910  and  those  of  LL.B.  and  J.D.  from  the  Uni- 
versity of  Michigan  in   1913;     Alice  Law   (died  June  20, 


I 877-1 889  219 

1903),  and  Madeline.  Mr.  Mills  was  a  brother  of  John 
Beale  Mills  (B.A.  1873,  LL.B.  1876),  and  a  half-brother 
of  the  late  William  Henry  Law,  a  graduate  of  the  College 
in  1878  and  of  the  School  of  Law  in  1880. 


William  John  Beecher,  LL.B.   1880 

Born  March  5,  1859,  in  Bridgeport,  Conn. 
Died  December  3,  1915,  in  Newtown,  Conn. 

William  John  Beecher,  son  of  John  and  Margaret 
Beecher,  was  born  in  Bridgeport,  Conn.,  March  5,  1859. 
He  received  his  preparatory  training  at  the  Staples  Insti- 
tute at  Easton,  Conn.,  entering  the  Yale  School  of  Law 
from  that  school  in  1879. 

In  July,  1880,  immediately  after  his  graduation,  he  was 
admitted  to  the  bar  in  New  Haven.  He  then  opened 
offices  in  Bridgeport,  where  he  practiced  all  his  life.  At 
the  time  of  his  death,  he  was  senior  member  of  the  firm 
of  Beecher  &  Canfield.  His  home  was  at  Newtown,  Conn., 
for  many  years,  and  for  a  long  time  he  served  as  judge 
of  the  Probate  Court  of  that  town. 

He  died  at  his  home  in  Newtown,  December  3,  191 5, 
from  arterio  sclerosis,  and  was  buried  in  the  local  cemetery. 

On  April  3,  1891,  he  was  married  to  Mary  B.,  daughter 
of  Henry  B.  and  Eliza  (Blakeslee)  Glover  of  Newtown. 
His  nephew,  John  Robert  Beecher,  received  the  degree  of 
LL.B.  at  Yale  in  1909,  and  was  associated  with  him  in 
practice. 


Harris  Gilbert  Eames,  LL.B.   i 

^  Born  January  i,  1867,  in  Newark,  N.  J. 
Died  November  11,   191 5,  in  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 

Harris  Gilbert  Eames  was  born  January  i,  1867,  in  New- 
ark, N.  J.,  his  parents  being  Harris  and  Margaret  Eliza- 
beth (Hughes)  Eames.  His  father,  a  leather  merchant 
of  New  Haven,  Conn.,  was  the  son  of  Henry  Eames,  a 
Methodist  minister,  and  Lydia  (Harris)  Eames  and  grand- 


2  20  SCHOOL    OF    LAW 

son  of  Henry  Eames,  who  came  to  this  country  from  Cork, 
Ireland,  in  1769  and  settled  in  Philadelphia.  His  mother 
was  the  daughter  of  Andrew  and  Sarah  Ann  (Scott) 
Hughes.  He  received  his  preparatory  training  at  Wes- 
leyan  Academy,  Wilbraham,  Mass.,  and  entered  the  Yale 
School  of  Law  in  1887. 

Shortly  after  his  graduation,  he  was  admitted  to  the 
Connecticut  Bar,  and  began  practice  in  West  Haven.  In 
January,  1890,  he  received  appointment  as  postmaster  there, 
and  filled  that  office  until  the  spring  of  1895,  when  he 
went  to  Brooklyn,  N.  Y.,  where  for  a  time  he  worked  as 
a  reporter  on  the  Brooklyn  Standard-Union.  Afterwards, 
he  was  in  the  Brooklyn  office  of  the  New  York  Herald,  but 
in  1 901  he  became  court  reporter  for  the  Brooklyn  Eagle. 
During  this  period,  he  had  given  his  attention  somewhat  to 
the  practice  of  law,  and  in  October,  1914,  he  resigned  from 
the  Eagle  to  devote  his  whole  time  to  his  practice.  Mr. 
Eames  was  a  member  of  the  Brooklyn  Bar  Association, 
the  Central  Y.  M.  C.  A.  of  Brooklyn,  and  Plymouth  (Con- 
gregational) Church.  From  19 10  to  19 13,  he  served  as 
president  of  the  Midwood  Park  Property  Owners' 
Association. 

His  death,  which  followed  an  attack  of  acute  indiges- 
tion, occurred  at  his  home  in  Brooklyn,  November  11, 
191 5.  He  was  buried  in  Oak  Grove  Cemetery,  West 
Haven. 

He  was  married  June  11,  1903,  in  Brooklyn  to  Anna 
Maud,  daughter  of  the  late  Frank  Emmett  and  Susan 
Maria  (Crown)  Parshley,  who  survives  him.  They  had 
no  children. 


Paul  Robinson  Jarboe,  LL.B.  1891 

Born  December  22,  1867,  in  San  Francisco,  Cat. 
Died  January  15,  1916,  in  San  Francisco,  Cal, 

Paul  Robinson  Jarboe  was  the  son  of  John  Rodolph 
Jarboe  (B.A.  1855)  and  Mary  Halsey  (Thomas)  Jarboe, 
and  was  born  December  22,  1867,  in  San  Francisco,  Cal. 
His  first  American  ancestor  was  French,  and  came  with 
Lord  Baltimore  about  1630,  settling  in  St.  Mary's  County, 
Maryland;   he  was  a  tobacco  planter,  having  as  his  planta- 


1889-1893  221 

tion  one  of  the  original  divisions  of  that  part  of  the  coun- 
try. His  maternal  ancestors  were  John  Thomas,  who  set- 
tled in  Marshfield  about  1630,  and  David  Brainerd,  one  of 
the  first  settlers  of  Haddam,  Conn.  In  the  branches  of 
these  two  families  are  the  names  of  many  of  the  first- 
comers  and  founders  of  the  cities  and  colleges  of  the  New 
England  states,  including  Rev.  Samuel  Whiting  and  Rev. 
John  Fisk.  Paul  Jarboe's  grandfather,  Rev.  Dr.  Eleazer 
Thomas,  was  killed  by  Modoc  Indians  while  serving  with 
General  Canby  on  the  Peace  Commission  to  the  Modocs. 

He  took  his  law  degree  in  1891,  two  years  after  enter- 
ing Yale,  and  after  graduation  became  associated  with  his 
father  in  practice  in  San  Francisco  under  the  firm  name  of 
Jarboe  &  Jarboe.  He  had  only  consented  to  be  a  lawyer 
to  please  his  father,  and  after  the  latter's  death  in  1893, 
found  that  his  desire  was  to  enter  a  business  life.  His 
business  efforts  were  along  lines  of  developing  the 
natural  resources  of  California,  and  for  the  greater  part 
of  his  life  he  was  a  partner  in  the  Columbia  Marble  Com- 
pany and  the  Tuolumne  Light  &  Power  Company.  At 
the  time  of  his  death,  which  occurred  very  suddenly  Janu- 
ary 15,  1916,  in  San  Francisco,  he  was  connected  wdth  the 
Garford  Truck  Company  of  that  city,  as  sales  manager. 

On  July  10,  1894,  Mr.  Jarboe  married  Miss  Eleanor 
Dimond,  eldest  daughter  of  General  Dimond  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, and  had  a  son,  John  Dimond.  His  second  marriage 
took  place  December  12,  191 5,  to  Mrs.  Carol  H.  Barton, 
who  survives  him.     His  mother  is  also  living. 


Ulysses  Simpson   [Grant]   Kendall,  LL.B.   1893 

_  Born  September  26,  1866,  in  Pocahontas,  Pa. 
Died  December  25,  1915,  in  Mount  Clemens,  Mich. 

Ulysses  Simpson  [Grant]  Kendall,  one  of  the  nine 
children  of  John  C.  Kendall,  a  farmer,  and  Elizabeth 
(Miller)  Kendall,  was  born  in  Pocahontas,  Pa.,  Septem- 
ber 26,  1866.  He  was  of  English  descent,  his  father  being 
the  son  of  Christian  and  Hannah  (Leydig)  Kendall.  His 
mother's  parents  were  David  and  Fannie  (Livingood) 
Miller. 


2  22  SCHOOL   OF    LAW 

He  studied  at  the  Curry  University  Preparatory  School 
at  Pittsburgh,  Pa.,  and  in  1890  was  graduated  from  Leba- 
non University  at  Lebanon,  Ohio.  After  spending  a  year 
in  the  Yale  School  of  Law,  he  received  the  degree  of  LL.B. 
in  1893.  In  the  fall  of  that  year,  he  entered  the  Sheffield 
Scientific  School,  but  during  the  winter  term  was  trans- 
ferred to  the  College  Class  of  1894,  with  which  he  was 
graduated. 

He  then  settled  at  Fairmont,  W.  Va.,  and  began  the 
practice  of  law.  In  1897,  he  was  elected  mayor  of  the 
city  on  the  Republican  ticket,  and  during  his  term  of  office 
he  served  as  president  of  the  West  Virginia  Mayors'  Asso- 
ciation. Three  years  later,  he  received  election  as  judge 
of  the  second  judicial  circuit  of  West  Virginia,  an  office 
which  he  held  until  December  31,  1907,  when  he  resumed 
the  practice  of  law.  In  1910,  he  spent  several  months  on 
the  Pacific  Coast,  and  then  opened  offices  for  the  prac- 
tice of  his  profession  in  Detroit,  Mich.,  where  he  became 
counsel  for  a  number  of  corporations.  He  belonged  to  the 
Presbyterian  Church  of  Fairmont. 

In  December,  191 5,  he  was  taken  ill  with  intestinal 
trouble,  and  went  to  St.  Joseph's  Hospital,  Mount  Clemens, 
Mich.,  for  treatment.  He  died  there  on  December  25, 
after  an  operation,  and  was  buried  in  his  native  town. 

Mr.  Kendall  was  not  married.  Surviving  him  are  three 
brothers  and  four  sisters. 


George  Frederick  Mull,  LL.B.   1894 

Born  December  7,  1868,  in  Manilla,  Ind. 
Died  August  26,  1915,  in  Indianapolis,  Ind. 

George  Frederick  Mull  was  the  son  of  Cyrus  Mull,  a 
farmer  and  trader,  and  Eleanor  J.  (Kerrick)  Mull.  Born 
at  Manilla,  Ind.,  December  7,  1868,  he  received  his  pre- 
paratory training  at  the  DePauw  Preparatory  School  at 
Greencastle,  Ind.  In  the  fall  of  1893,  having  been  gradu- 
ated from  DePauw  University  with  the  degree  of  Ph.B. 
the  previous  June,  he  took  up  the  study  of  law  at  Yale. 

He  was  admitted  to  the  Indiana  Bar  in  1894,  and  imme- 
diately began  practice  in  Indianapolis.  In  November,  1895, 
he  became  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Edenharter  &  Mull, 


I 893-1901  223 

continuing  in  that  connection  until  his  death,  which  oc- 
curred August  26,  191 5,  in  the  Methodist  Episcopal  Hospi- 
tal, Indianapolis,  as  the  result  of  blood  poisoning.  At  the 
time  when  he  received  the  injury  which  brought  about  his 
death,  he  was  suffering  from  diabetes,  which  had  reached  an 
advanced  stage.     Burial  was  at  Rushville,  Ind. 


William  Carmody  Keane,  LL.B.   1899 

Born  February  23,  1873,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  December  3,  1915,  in  New  York  City 

William  Carmody  Keane  was  born  in  New  Haven,  Conn., 
February  23,  1873,  his  parents  being  William  Keane,  an 
aldernian  and  member  of  the  New  Haven  City  Council, 
and  Ann  (Whalen)  Keane.  He  received  his  early  educa- 
tion in  the  schools  of  New  Haven,  graduating  from  the 
Hillhouse  High  School,  and  in  1896  entered  the  Yale 
School  of  Law.  He  belonged  to  both  the  Kent  and  Way- 
land  clubs,  serving  as  vice  president  and  treasurer  of  the 
latter  in  his  Senior  year,  and  was  awarded  a  Kent  Club 
diploma  at  graduation  in  1899. 

Soon  afterwards,  he  was  admitted  to  the  Connecticut 
Bar,  and  immediately  took  up  the  practice  of  law  in  New 
Haven.  He  removed  to  New  York  City  some  years  later, 
and  spent  the  remainder  of  his  life  in  that  city,  where  he 
died  December  3,  191 5.  His  body  was  brought  to  New 
Haven  for  burial  in  St.  Bernard's  Cemetery. 

Mr.  Keane  was  unmarried,  and  is  survived  by  three 
brothers  and  three  sisters.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
Roman  Catholic  Church. 


Edward  Francis  Hallen,  LL.B.   1901 

Born  January  i6,  1867,  in  Nashua,  N.  H. 
Died  December  21,  1914,  in  Nashua,  N.  H. 

Edward  Francis  Hallen,  son  of  John  and  Honora  (Mark- 
ham)  Hallen,  was  born  in  Nashua,  N.  H.,  January  16,  1867. 
He  attended  the  schools  in  that  town,  being  graduated  in 
1883  from  the  Nashua  High  School.     Two  years  later,  he 

\ 


2  24  SCHOOL   OF   LAW 

went  to  Bridgeport,  Conn.,  where  he  took  a  position  as. 
cashier  for  the  Bridgeport  Forge  Company.  In  1899,  he 
began  a  special  course  in  law  at  Yale,  and  the  next  year, 
after  severing  his  connection  with  the  Bridgeport  Forge 
Company,  was  enrolled  as  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class 
in  the  School  of  Law,  and  served  on  the  editorial  board 
of  the  Yale  Lazu  Journal. 

While  taking  his  work  at  Yale,  he  was  connected  with 
the  law  firm  of  Paige  &  Carroll  of  Bridgeport,  and  since 
his  graduation  had  practiced  in  that  city.  In  1910,  he  was 
elected  judge  of  the  Probate  Court,  and  held  that  office 
until  his  death.  He  was  made  a  member  of  the  Bridge- 
port Board  of  Education  in  1890,  and  for  nineteen  years 
served  as  its  secretary.  In  1904,  he  was  the  candidate  of 
the  Democratic  party  for  representative  from  the_  fourth 
Connecticut  Congressional  district,  but  was  defeated  by 
the  Republican  nominee.  He  served  as  president  of  the 
Board  of  Police  Commissioners  of  Bridgeport  in  1910  and 
1911. 

His  death,  which  was  due  to  Bright's  disease,  occurred 
December  21,  1914,  in  Nashua,  where  he  had  been  for  a 
month.  He  was  buried  in  St.  Michael's  Cemetery  in 
Bridgeport.  Mr.  Hallen  was  not  married.  His  Yale  rela- 
tives include  John  Edward  Hallen  (B.A.  1916)  and 
Francis  Augustus  Hallen,  of  the  Class  of  19 18  in  the 
Scientific  School. 


George  Groot  Snow,  LL.B.  1907 

Born  January  25,  1884,  in  Sprinj?field,  S.  Dak. 
Died  August  i,  1915,  in  Springfield,  S.  Dak. 

George  Groot  Snow  was  born  in  Springfield,  S.  Dak., 
January  25,  1884,  his  parents  being  George  Washington 
and  Albirta  M.  (Davison)  Snow.  His  father,  who  served 
in  the  Twentieth  Wisconsin  Infantry  during  the  Civil 
War,  went  to  Dakota  Territory  in  1869,  and  on  the  admis- 
sion of  South  Dakota  as  a  state  into  the  Union  took  an 
active  part  in  the  framing  of  its  constitution ;  he  has  been 
a  member  of  the  State  Senate,  and  from  1901  to  1905  filled 
the  office  of  lieutenant  governor  of  South  Dakota.  The 
son's   preparatory   training   was    received   at   the    Shattuck 


I9OI-I9IO  225 

School  at  Faribault,  Minn.,  and  before  entering  Yale  in 
1905  he  spent  two  years  in  the  study  of  law  at  the  Uni- 
versity of  Michigan. 

After  graduating  from  the  Yale  School  of  Law  in  1907, 
he  entered  upon  the  practice  of  law  in  Seattle,  Wash.,  where 
he  was  located  until  191 2.  In  April  of  that  year,  he 
returned  to  his  native  town,  and  followed  his  profession 
there  until  his  death,  which  occurred  at  his  home,  as  the 
result  of  a  self-inflicted  shot-gun  wound,  on  August  i, 
191 5.     Burial  was  in  Springfield. 

He  was  not  married,  and  is  survived  by  his  father  and 
a  brother.  He  belonged  to  the»  Protestant  Episcopal 
Church. 


Ralph  Hayford  Lincoln,  LL.B.  19 10 

Born  August  30,  1885,  at  Fall  River,  Mass. 
Died  April  19,  1916,  at  Fall  River,  Mass. 

Ralph  Hayford  Lincoln  was  born  at  Fall  River,  Mass., 
August  30,  1885,  being  the  son  of  Arba  Nelson  Lincoln, 
a  lawyer  of  Fall  River,  and  Mira  (Kimball)  Lincoln.  His 
paternal  grandparents  were  Charles  Fisher  and  Eliza  Ara- 
belle  (Avery)  Lincoln.  On  that  side  of  the  family,  he 
was  descended  from  Thomas  Lincoln,  who  came  to  Hing- 
ham,  Mass.,  from  Hingham,  England,  in  1635,  and  in 
1649  settled  at  Taunton,  Mass. ;  here  he  was  granted  a 
grist  mill  privilege  and  became  the  miller  for  the  colony. 
On  the  Avery  line,  he  was  descended  from  Thomas  Avery, 
who  settled  in  Portsmouth,  N.  H.,  prior  to  1657.  ^^^ 
mother  was  .the  daughter  of  Alfred  Russell  and  Sarah 
Welch  (Hayford)  Kimball  of  Haverhill,  Mass.,  and  a 
descendant  of  Richard  Kimball,  who^  emigrated  from  Eng- 
land and  settled  in  Watertown,  Mass.,  in  1634. 

He  entered  the  Yale  School  of  Law  in  1907,  upon  grad- 
uating from  Phillips  Exeter  Academy,  and  completed  his 
course  three  years  later.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Way- 
land  Club. 

After  his  graduation  in  1910,  he  went  to  Medford,  Ore., 
where,  upon  being  admitted  to  the  bar,  he  practiced  law 
for  a  year  or  more,  and  then  engaged  in  the  automobile 
business  as  manager  of  the  Bear  Creek  Motor  Car  Com- 


2  26  SCHOOL   OF   LAW 

pany.  He  returned  to  Fall  River  in  1914,  and  became 
local  agent  for  the  Studebaker  Automobile  Company,  as 
a  member  of  the  firm  of  Ralph  H.  Lincoln  &  Company,  in 
which  he  was  associated  with  his  father.  He  was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Central  Congregational  Church  of  Fall  River. 

His  death  occurred  April  19,  1916,  at  the  Union  Hos- 
pital at  Fall  River,  following  an  operation  for  appendicitis. 
His  body  was  cremated  at  the  Massachusetts  Crematory 
at  Forest  Hills. 

On  November  30,  191 1,  Mr.  Lincoln  was  married  in 
Maiden,  Mass.,  to  Jennie  Tracy,  daughter  of  Zachariah 
and  Ida  (Cornu)  Lambert,  who  survives  him  with  two 
children,  Hayford  Nelson  and  Warner  Conrad.  He  is 
also  survived  by  his  parents,  three  brothers,  Ernest  Avery 
Lincoln,  who  received  the  degrees  of  B.S.  and  C.E.  at 
Dartmouth  College  in  1908  and  1909,  respectively;  Ken- 
neth Chandler  Lincoln  (B.A.  Williams  1914),  and  Carl 
Kimball  Lincoln,  a  graduate  of  Dartmouth  with  the  degree 
of  B.S.  in  1916,  and  by  a  sister,  Grace  Lincoln,  who 
received  the  degree  of  B.A.  at  Wellesley  College  in  191 1. 


Harold  Edward  Tierney,  LL.B.   191 1 

Born  February  17,  1888,  in  Goshen,  N.  Y. 
Died  January  23,  1916,  in  Closter,  N.  J. 

Harold  Edward  Tierney,  son  of  William  Tierney,  deputy 
surveyor  of  the  New  York  Customs  House  from  1908  to 
1916,  was  born  in  Goshen,  N.  Y.,  February  17,  1888.  His 
mother  was  Mary  F.,  daughter  of  Patrick  and  Kate  Gor- 
man. His  high  school  education  was  received  in  Engle- 
wood,  N.  J.,  which  had  been  his  home  since  1894.  He 
entered  the  Yale  School  of  Law  in  1908,  being  graduated 
three  years  later. 

Since  that  time,  he  had  practiced  law  independently  in 
Englewood.  He  had  been  active  in  politics,  and  was  the 
Democratic  candidate  for  member  of  the  New  Jersey 
Assembly  from  Bergen  County  in  1915.  He  was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Roman  Catholic  Church,  and  attended  St. 
Cecilia's  at  Englewood. 

Qn  January  23,  1916,  Mr.  Tierney  was  instantly  killed 
in  an  automobile  accident  at  Closter,  not  far  from  Engle- 


LL.B.    I9IO-M.L.    1909  227 

wood.     Interment  was  In  Mount  Carmel  Cemetery,  Engle- 
wood. 

He  was  married  June  9,  1913,  in  New  Haven,  Conn.,  to 
Theresa  Victorine,  daug:hter  of  Georg-e  and  Mary  (Wood) 
Stanford  and  sister  of  James  W.  Stanford  (Ph.B.  1906). 
Mrs.  Tierney  survives  her  husband.    They  had  no  children. 


MASTER   OF   LAWS 

Proceso  Gonzales  Sanchez,  M.L.   1909 

Born  July  2,  1886,  in  Bacolor,  Pampanga,  P.  I. 
Died  June  5,  1915,  in  Manila,  P.  I. 

Proceso  Gonzales  Sanchez  was  born  at  Bacolor,  Pam- 
panga, P.  I.,  July  2,  1886,  being  the  son  of  Pedro  Sanchez, 
a  graduate  of  the  College  of  Pampanga  and  of  St.  Tomas 
University  at  Manila,  who  was  a  teacher  during  the 
Spanish  regime  in  the  Philippine  Islands,  later  serving 
as  municipal  president  under  the  Military  Government  and 
as  secretary  in  the  municipal  president's  office  at  Concep- 
cion.     His  mother's  maiden  name  was  Valentina  Gonzales. 

He  received  his  preparatory  training  at  the  Tarlac  High 
School,  and  in  1905  carne  to  the  United  States.  Three 
years  later,  he  was  graduated  from  Indiana  University  with 
the  degree  of  LL.B.,  and  admitted  to  the  Indiana  Bar. 
The  year  of  1908-09  was  spent  in  the  Yale  School  of  Law, 
and  on  the  completion  of  his  course  he  was  given  the 
degree  of  Master  of  Laws  cum  laude. 

After  serving  successively  as  a  clerk  in  the  Court  of 
Land  Registration,  the  Bureau  of  Education,  and  in  the 
Law  Division  of  the  Executive  Bureau  of  the  Philippines, 
Mr.  Sanchez  was,  in  January,  1913,  appointed  a  clerk  in 
the  Bureau  of  Justice,  having  been  admitted  to  practice 
in  the  Philippines  the  previous  September.  In  September, 
1913,  he  was  designated  as  a  special  assistant  for  the  pur- 
pose of  representing  the  Government  in  land  cases  in 
Pangasinan,  and  he  afterwards  served  as  the  represen- 
tative of  the  Government  in  land  cases  in  Bataan  Province, 
as  acting  provincial  fiscal  of  Palawan  and  of  Bulacan,  as 
acting  provincial  of  Bulacan  and  of  Zambales,  and  as 
special  prosecuting  attorney  of  Tayabas  and  of  Bulacan. 


228  SCHOOL   OF   LAW 

In  the  summer  of  1914,  he  also  conducted  the  prosecution 
of  certain  criminal  cases  in  Bataan. 

While  serving  as  special  prosecuting  attorney  in  Bula- 
can,  he  was  taken  ill  with  typhoid  fever,  and  his  death 
occurred  June  5,  191 5,  at  the  Phihppine  General  Hospital 
in  Manila.  He  was  a  Roman  Catholic,  and  was  buried 
in  the  Binondo  Catholic  Cemetery  at  Manila. 

He  was  unmarried.  His  parents,  two  brothers,  and 
two  sisters  survive  him. 


M.L.    I909-B.D.    1875  229 


SCHOOL  OF  RELIGION 
William  Taylor  Jackson,  B.D.   1875 

Born  October  25,  1839,  in  Willoughby,  England 
Died  September  12,  1915,  in  Mount  Pleasant,  Iowa 

William  Taylor  Jackson  was  born  in  Willoughby,  Eng- 
land, October  25,  1839,  his  parents  being  Thomas  and  Char- 
lotte Jackson.  He  received  his  early  schooling  in  Richmond, 
England,  and  came  to  America  at  the  age  of  fifteen. 
In  1864,  he  was  graduated  from  Western  (now  Leander 
Clark)  College,  where  three  years  later  he  received  the 
degree  of  M.A.  He  then  spent  some  time  in  educational 
work,  and  in  1872  entered  the  Yale  School  of  Religion 
from  Poolesville,  Ind. 

After  his  graduation  in  1875,  he  spent  three  years  as 
principal  of  Green  Hill  Seminary  at  Green  Hill,  Ind. 
He  received  the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Philosophy  from  the 
University  of  Michigan  in  1879,  and  during  the  next  year 
taught  at  the  Fostoria  (Ohio)  Academy.  In  1880-81,  he 
served  as  acting  professor  of  modern  languages  at  Indi- 
ana University,  and  then  returned  to  Fostoria,  and  taught 
at  the  academy  until  1894.  At  that  time,  he  was  appointed 
superintendent  of  the  Fostoria  public  schools,  and  con- 
tinued in  that  position  until  1890,  when  he  accepted  the 
professorship  of  English  and  literature  at  Western  Col- 
lege. During  1892-93,  he  was  acting  professor  of  the 
science  and  art  of  teaching  and  of  political  economy  at 
Cornell  College,  Mount  Vernon,  Iowa. 

In  1893,  he  was  ordained,  and  became  rector  of  Trinity 
Protestant  Episcopal  Church  at  Emmetsburg,  Iowa,  where 
he  remained  for  seventeen  years.  Since  1909,  he  had  been 
in  charge  of  St.  Michael's  parish  at  Mount  Pleasant,  Iowa, 
where  he  died  September  12,  191 5,  from  cerebral  menin- 
gitis.    His  body  was  taken  to  Iowa  City  for  burial. 

While  he  was  in  northern  Iowa,  Mr.  Jackson  served  as 
dean  of  the  Sioux  City  Deanery,  and  after  his  removal 
to  Mount  Pleasant  he  was  for  upwards  of  ten  years  a 
member  of  the  Standing  Committee  of  the  Diocese,  as  well 
as  being  one  of  the  examining  chaplains. 


230  SCHOOL   OF   RELIGION 

His  marriage  took  place  in  Iowa  City,  November  23, 
1865,  to  Virginia  E.,  daughter  of  Jacob  and  Elizabeth 
Shuey,  who  survives  him  with  five  children :  Fred  T. ; 
Lester  T.,  who  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  from  the  State 
University  of  Iowa  in  1896;  Cora  May  (Jackson)  Car- 
son, a  student  at  Syracuse  University  during  1895-96; 
Grace  (Jackson)  Alston,  and  Herbert  P.  A  daughter, 
Bessie  B.,  died  in  infancy,  and  the  death  of  their  eldest 
son,  William  Shuey,  who  studied  at  Oberlin  College  from 
1887  to  1889,  occurred  in  April,  1896. 


Lester  Beach  Piatt,  B.D.  1875 

Born  August  30,  1852,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  November  i,  1915,  in  Washington,  D,  C. 

Lester  Beach  Piatt  was  the  son  of  Landra  Beach  Piatt, 
a  merchant,  and  Harriet  (Hemmenway)  Piatt,  and  was 
born  in  New  Haven,  Conn.,  August  30,  1852.  Plis  ances- 
tors were  identified  with  the  early  settlement  of  New  Haven 
Colony,  Richard  Piatt  at  one  time  having  owned  land  in 
what  is  now  the  center  of  the  city  of  New  Haven.  Later 
the  family  moved  to  Milford,  Conn.,  where  his  father  was 
born.  The  name  of  Richard  Piatt  appears  on  the  Memorial 
Bridge  at  Milford. 

He  entered  the  preparatory  department  of  Oberlin  Col- 
lege in  1867,  his  home  at  that  time  being  in  Baltimore,  Md., 
and  five  years  later,  upon  the  completion  of  his  college 
course,  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  An  interesting  epi- 
sode in  Mr.  Piatt's  life  occurred  after  his  graduation  from 
Oberlin,  when  he  spent  three  months  in  Nebraska  among 
the  Pawnee  Indians  and  accompanied  them  on  their  annual 
buffalo  hunt.  The  party  was  attacked  by  the  Sioux  and 
most  of  the  men  killed.  Mr.  Piatt  narrowly  escaped,  and 
was  instrumental  in  saving  many  wounded  Indians,  besides 
women  and  children  and  their  winter's  supply  of  food. 
His  account  of  this  experience  was  printed  in  an  early 
number  of  the  Cosmopolitan  Magazine. 

He  began  the  study  of  theology  at  Yale  in  1872,  remain- 
ing until  1874,  when  he  withdrew  and  spent  about  two 
years  in  study  at  Berlin  and  Leipsic  and  in  Continental 
travel.     On   November  6,    1877,   he  was   ordained   to  the 


II 


i875  231 

ministry  of  the  Cangregational  Church  at  Falls  Church, 
Va.,  and  cpntinued  there  until  June,  1880,  when  he  accepted 
a  call  to  Owosso,  Mich.  During  his  pastorate  of  two  years 
in  that  town,  he  took  several  months'  leave  of  absence, 
traveling  through  the  Holy  Land,  Egypt,  Greece,  and 
Italy;  his  lectures  on  Asia  Minor  were  later  published 
in  the  Cosmopolitan  Magazine  and  local  papers.  After 
resigning  his  pastorate  in  Owosso,  he  took  a  course  cov- 
ering about  six  months  in  the  Yale  Theological  Depart- 
ment, and  in  May,  1883,  the  degree  of  B.D.  was  voted  to 
him  by  the  Yale  Corporation,  and  he  was  enrolled  with 
his  former  Class.  He  was  then  settled  over  the  Congre- 
gational Church  at  Flint,  Mich.,  where  he  remained  until 
1886.  His  next  charge,  which  covered  a  period  of  two 
years,  was  that  of  the  Union  Congregational  Church  at 
Upper  Montclair,  N.  J.  Since  1893,  he  had  resided  in 
Washington,  D.  C,  where  he  was  identified  with  various 
manufacturing  and  financial  interests.  At  the  time  of  his 
death,  Mr.  Piatt  was  a  trustee  of  the  First  Congregational 
Church  of  that  city,  of  which  he  had  been  a  member  for 
many  years. 

His  death  occurred  at  his  home  in  Washington,  Novem- 
ber I,  191 5,  and  followed  an  illness  of  three  months. 
Burial  was  in  Greenmount  Cemetery,  Baltimore. 

He  was  married  in  Owosso,  Mich.,  December  19,  1883, 
to  Lucy  Beach,  daughter  of  William  Kellogg  and  Helen 
(Beach)  Tillotson,  who  survives  him  with  their  two  sons, 
Tillotson  Beach  (Ph.B.  1908)  and  Lester  Beach,  Jr.  (Ph.B. 
1913). 


Edward  Payson  Root,  B.D.   1875 

Born  August  4,  1844,  in  Montague,  Mass. 
Died  January  8,  1916,  in  Northampton,  Mass. 

Edward  Payson  Root,  son  of  Solomon  Wellington  Root, 
a  farmer,  and  Betsey  Aurelia  (Kellogg)  Root,  was  born 
August  4,  1844,  in  Montague,  Mass.  His  earliest  paternal 
ancestor  in  this  country  was  Thomas  Root,  who  came 
from  Badby,  England,  and,  after  spending  seven  years 
at  Hartford,  Conn.,  settled  in  Northampton,  Mass.,  in  1654. 
His  mother  was  the  daughter  of  Flam  and  Betsey  (Dole) 
Kellogg. 


232  SCHOOL   OF   RELIGION 

He  received  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  in 
his  native  town  and  at  Kimball  Union  Academy,  Meriden, 
N.  H.,  and  in  1867  entered  Amherst  College.  Graduat- 
ing from  that  institution  four  years  later,  he  spent  the 
year  of  1871-72  as  an  assistant  in  the  Amherst  College 
Library.  From  1872  to  1875,  he  studied  theology  at  Yale, 
receiving  his  B.D.  in  the  latter  year. 

In  June,  1876,  after  spending  a  year  in  preaching  at 
Hampden,  Mass.,  he  was  ordained  to  the  ministry  of  the 
Congregational  Church,  and  from  that  time  until  Decem- 
ber, 1883,  held  the  pastorate  of  the  First  Congregational 
Church  of  Hampden.  In  1884,  he  accepted  a  call  to  East 
Hampton,  Conn.,  and  remained  there  until  1891,  when  he 
went  to  Colorado.  For  the  next  three  years,  he  was  pastor 
of  the  Congregational  Church  at  Highland  Lake,  and 
from  1894  to  1897  of  the  Buena  Vista  Congregational 
Church.  Returning  to  the  East  in  1904,  he  became  in  that 
year  pastor  of  the  Somers  (Conn.)  Congregational  Church. 

From  1910  until  his  death,  which  occurred  at  his  home 
in  Northampton,  Mass.,  January  8,  1916,  as  the  result  of 
grippe,  he  was  in  charge  of  the  Congregational  Church 
at  Becket,  Mass.  He  was  buried  in  Spring  Grove  Ceme- 
tery at  Northampton. 

Mr.  Root  was  married  in  New  Haven,  Conn.,  December 
24,  1875,  to  Fannie  L,  daughter  of  Ira  and  Mary  (Hills) 
Bryant,  who  survives  him  with  two  daughters,  Louise 
Hills,  a  graduate  of  Colorado  College  with  the  degree  of 
Ph.B.,  and  Florence  Kellogg  (B.A.  Smith  1906). 


Albert  Henry  Thompson,  B.D.   1875 

Born  January  27,  1849,  in  Chelsea,  Mass. 
Died  January  29,  1916,  in  Raymond,  N.  H. 

Albert  Henry  Thompson,  whose  parents  were  Edward 
K.  and  Elizabeth  D.  (Smith)  Thompson,  was  born  Jan- 
uary 27,  1849,  in  Chelsea,  Mass.  When  he  was  three  years 
of  age,  his  father,  a  sea  captain,  and  his  mother  were 
drowned  at  sea,  and  he  was  brought  up  in  the  home  of 
relatives  of  the  latter  at  Searsport,  Maine.  After  gradu- 
ating from  Phillips  (Andover)  Academy,  he  entered 
Amherst  College,  where  he  received  the  degree  of  B.A. 


I 


1875-1876  233 

in  1872.  He  was  the  valedictorian  of  his  college  class 
and  also  its  permanent  secretary.  From  1872  to  1875,  he 
was  a  student  in  the  Yale  School  of  Religion,  taking  his 
B.D.  in  the  latter  year. 

Mr.  Thompson  was  licensed  to  preach  by  the  New  Haven 
West  Association  in  1874,  being  ordained  to  the  Congre- 
gational ministry  at  Bingham,  Maine,  February  26,  1879. 
From  1875  to  1877,  he  was  stated  supply  at  Georgetown, 
Conn.,  and  then  for  two  years  at  Bingham.  He  was  pastor 
of  the  Congregational  Church  at  Cromwell,  Iowa,  during 
1879-80,  for  the  next  seven  years  being  acting  pastor  at 
Wakefield,  N.  H.  During  this  latter  period,  he  wrote 
a  sketch  of  the  town  for  the  "History  of  Carroll  County." 
Since  1888,  he  had  held  the  pastorate  of  the  Raymond 
(N.  H.)  Congregational  Church,  and  he  died  suddenly  at 
his  home  in  that  town,  January  29,  19 16,  from  angina 
pectoris.     Burial  was  in  Pine  Grove  Cemetery. 

For  seventeen  years,  Mr.  Thompson  was  secretary- 
treasurer  of  the  Rockingham  Conference  of  Congregational 
and  Presbyterian  Churches,  and  he  had  served  as  chap- 
lain of  the  Raymond  Grange  and  of  the  Governor  Bachelder 
Pomona  Grange.  He  was  a  regular  correspondent  of 
several  newspapers,  including  the  Exeter  (N.  H.)  News- 
Letter.  On  August  7,  191 5,  he  delivered  the  historical 
address  at  the  celebration  of  the  one  hundredth  anniversary 
of  the  Congregational  Church  of  Searsport. 

He  was  married  in  Lowell,  January  13,  1885,  to  Mrs. 
Arvilla  Pitman,  daughter  of  Loammi  and  Mary  B.  Hardy. 
Two  daughters,  Arvilla  H.  (Mrs.  Robert  G.  Ewell  of 
Fostoria,  Ohio)  and  Elizabeth  H.,  survive  him.  Another 
daughter,  Rose  Standish,  died  in  infancy. 


Rolla  George  Bugbee,  B.D.  1876 

Born  September  7,  1848,  in  Brid^ewater,  Vt. 
Died  August  13,  1915,  in  Peterboro,  N.  H. 

Rolla  George  Bugbee  was  born  September  7,  1848,  in 
Bridgewater,  Vt.  In  1871,  he  was  graduated  from  Dart- 
mouth College,  and  entered  the  Yale  School  of  Religion 
two  years  later,  receiving  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Divin- 
ity in  1876. 


234  SCHOOL   OF   RELIGION 

On  November  8,  1876,  he  was  ordained  as  a  Congre- 
gational minister  at  West  Hartland,  Conn.,  where  he 
preached  until  November,  1880.  His  later  pastorates  were 
in  Bridgewater,  Bethel,  and  Randolph,  Vt.,  Canton,  N.  Y., 
Thomaston,  Conn.,  Wells  River,  Vt.,  Athol,  Mass.,  and 
Peterboro,  N.  H.  He  died  in  the  latter  town,  August  13, 
1915. 

Mr.  Bugbee  was  married  in  Mechanicsville,  Vt.,  August 
24,  1876,  to  Susan  Imogene  Barrett.  They  had  two  chil- 
dren, only  one  of  whom  is  living. 


John  Wesley  Horner,  B.D.   1876 

Born  September  6,  1852,  in  Lanesville,  Ind. 
Died  February  8,  1916,  in  West  Chicago,  111. 

John  Wesley  Horner,  son  of  Jacob  S.  Horner,  who 
served  as  a  surgeon  in  an  Indiana  Regiment  during  the 
Civil  War,  and  Nancy  Horner,  was  born  September  6,  1852, 
in  Lanesville,  Ind.  After  spending  three  years  at  Indiana 
University,  he  entered  the  Yale  School  of  Religion  in  1873, 
remaining  until  1876. 

Soon  after  his  graduation  from  Yale,  he  was  ordained 
as  a  Congregational  minister  at  Bloomfield,  Iowa,  and 
spent  the  next  year  there  as  pastor.  In  1877,  ^^  was  called 
to  the  First  Congregational  Church  at  Keosauqua,  Iowa, 
where  he  was  located  until  1879.  During  the  next  two 
years,  he  studied  law,  later  holding  pastorates  at  Otsego, 
Mich.,  Lake  City,  Minn.,  New  Hampton  and  Independence, 
Iowa,  Aberdeen,  S.  Dak.,  and  at  Revere,  Mass.  In  191 1, 
the  condition  of  his  health  forced  him  to  resign  the  charge 
of  the  Union  Congregational  Church  at  Auburn  Park,  Chi- 
cago, 111.,  which  he  had  held  for  two  years.  In  1914,  after 
spending  the  interval  in  California,  Florida,  and  Chicago, 
he  was  able  to  accept  a  call  to  the  Congregational  Church 
at  Metropolis,  111.,  where  he  remained  for  a  year  and  a 
half.  Mr.  Horner  had  patented  a  number  of  inventions, 
notable  among  them  being  a  door  mat,  which  is  now  used 
extensively. 

His  death  occurred  suddenly,  as  the  result  of  heart  dis- 
ease, February  8,  1916,  in  West  Chicago,  111.,  where  he 
had  been  living  for  three  months  as  pastor  of  the   Con- 


1876-1878  235 

gregational  Church.     His  body  was  taken  to  Des  Moines, 
Iowa,  for  burial. 

Mr.  Horner  was  married  in  1877,  in  Bloomfield,  Iowa, 
to  Orpha  Morgan,  who  died  in  1880.  By  this  marriage, 
there  was  one  son,  Charles,  who  survives.  On  September 
22,  1881,  Mr.  Horner's  second  marriage  took  place  at 
Des  Moines  to  Gertrude,  daughter  of  Robert  L.  and 
Jennie  Clark,  who  survives  him  with  their  two  daughters, 
Hazel  (Mrs.  C.  C.  Hitchcock  of  Milwaukee)  and  Helen 
(Mrs.  E.  M.  Olds,  also  of  that  city). 


Thomas  Whitney  Darling,  B.D.   1878 

Born  October  21,  1849,  in  Keene,  N.  H. 
Died  May  7,  1916,  in  Windsor,  Vt. 

Thomas -Whitney  Darling  was  born  in  Keene,  N.  H., 
October  21,  1849,  the  son  of  Daniel  and  Theodosia  (Stone) 
Darling.  His  father,  a  farmer,  was  the  son  of  Rev.  David 
Darling,  who  attended  Brown  for  several  years  and 
received  the  degree  of  B.A.  from  Yale  in  1779. 

He  received  his  preparatory  training  under  Rev.  J.  A. 
Leach  in  his  native  town,  and  in  1871  entered  Mid- 
dlebury  College  from  Amherst,  where  he  had  been  a 
member  of  the  Class  of  1874.  In  1874,  he  was  graduated 
from  Middlebury,  and  in  the  fall  began  the  study  of 
theology  at  Yale,  where  he  received  the  degree  of  B.D. 
four  years  later.-  In  1876,  he  taught  at  the  Collegiate  Insti- 
tute in  Springfield,  Mass.,  and  the  year  of  1878-79  was 
spent  by  him  as  superintendent  of  the  schools  of  Nelson, 
N.  H.  He  was  ordained  to  the  ministry  of  the  Congre- 
gational Church  in  October,  1881,  and  during  the  next 
three  years  served  as  pastor  at  Wentworth,  N.  H.  In  the 
winter  of  1883,  he  accepted  a  call  to  the  Congregational 
Church  at  Danville,  Vt.,  where  he  was  located  until  1888. 
At  that  time,  he  returned  to  Wentworth  and  preached 
there  for  a  year.  From  1889  to  1894,  he  held  the  pas- 
torate of  the  Acworth  (N.  H.)  Congregational  Church, 
and  then  went  back  to  Wentworth,  his  third  pastorate 
covering  a  period  of  six  years.  In  1900,  he  became  pastor 
of  the  Congregational  Church  at  Ripton,  Vt.,  and  held 
that  charge  until  March,  1901,  making  his  home  at  Middle- 


236  SCHOOL   OF   RELIGION 

bury.  For  six  years,  Mr.  Darling  also  served  as  super- 
intendent of  the  schools  of  Danville,  and  at  this  time  was 
a  faithful  worker  for  the  betterment  of  all  town  conditions. 

He  died  May  7,  1916,  in  Windsor,  Vt.,  where  he  had 
lived  since  January,  1915.  He  was  at  that  time  in  the 
employ  of  the  National  Acme  Manufacturing  Company. 
His  death  was  due  to  cystitis,  from  which  he  had  suffered 
for  several  weeks.  Burial  was  in  Lyndonwood  Cemetery, 
Stoneham,  Mass. 

Mr.  Darling  was  married  August  28,  1877,  in  Middle- 
bury,  Vt.,  to  Delia  H.,  daughter  of  Mrs.  Aqubia  Rock- 
well, who  survives  him.  They  had  three  children:  Gertie 
May,  who  married  Clifford  E.  Smith  of  Brattleboro,  Vt. ; 
Ralph  Whitney,  who  died  in  Stoneham,  Mass.,  April  24, 
1909,  and  Grace  Genevieve,  whose  death  occurred  in 
Acworth,  January  27,  1891. 


V\^illiam  Edward  Jefifries,  B.D.  1883 

Born  March  23,  1852,  in  Fredericksburg,  Va. 
Died  August  17,  1915,  in  Port  Chester,  N.  Y. 

William  Edward  Jeffries,  son  of  William  J.  and  Mary 
E.  Jeffries,  was  born  March  23,  1852,  in  Fredericksburg, 
Va.,  and  attended  a  military  school  in  that  town.  After 
working  for  six  years  as  a  bookkeeper  in  a  wholesale  car- 
pet house  in  Washington,  D.  C,  he  entered  Drew  Theo- 
logical Seminary  in  1879,  being  graduated  in  May,  1882. 
The  following  year,  he  received  the  degree  of  B.D.  from 
Yale. 

In  1884,  he  joined  the  New  York  East  Conference,  two 
years  later  being  ordained  as  a  deacon  in  the  Methodist 
Episcopal  Church  at  the  DeKalb  Avenue  Church  in 
Brooklyn.  He  was  ordained  as  an  elder  in  1888.  His 
first  charge  was  at  Saugatuck,  Conn.,  and  his  second  in 
Madison,  Conn.  He  was  afterwards  pastor  of  churches 
at  Bay  Ridge,  Unionville,  Bridgeport,  Port  Chester,  Strat- 
ford, Mianus,  Cutchogue,  New  Haven,  and  Port  Jefferson. 
He  resigned  his  pastorate  in  the  latter  town  in  1907,  and 
in  May  of  that  year  entered  the  insurance  business  in 
New  Haven  with  his  brother,  Thomas  T.  Jeffries,  con- 
tinuing his  interest  in  that  direction  until  his  death.    During 


1878-1885  237 

this  period,  he  did  much  Sunday  supply  work,  preaching 
in  both  Congregational  and  Methodist  churches. 

Mr.  Jeffries  was  taken  suddenly  ill  in  December,  1914, 
and  afterwards  suffered  from  heart  and  kidney  trouble. 
His^  death  occurred  at  the  home  of  his  sister  in  Port 
Chester,  N.  Y.,  August  17,  191 5.  Burial  was  in  King 
Street  Cemetery  in  that  city,  near  the  church  which  he 
had  erected  and  dedicated  in  1893. 

He  was  married  on  May  27,  1885,  in  Saugatuck  to 
Nettie  E.,  daughter  of  Edwin  D.  and  Ann  E.  Hopkins. 
She  survives  him  with  a  son,  Edward  H. 


Thomas  Milton  Beadenkoff,  B.D.  1885 

Born  June  16,  1855,  in  Baltimore,  Md. 
Died  September  7,  1915,  in  Baltimore,  Md. 

Thomas  Milton  Beadenkoff,  son  of  Martin  Beadenkoff, 
was  born  June  16,  1855,  in  Baltimore,  Md,,  where  his 
father  was  engaged  in  business  as  a  baker.  His  mother 
was  Emeline  Graham,  daughter  of  William  and  Rachel 
(Graham)  Purnell  and  granddaughter  of  William  Graham, 
who  fought  in  the  Revolutionary  War.  He  received  his 
early  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Baltimore,  and  was 
a  graduate  of  Baltimore  City  College  in  1871  and  of 
Johns  Hopkins  University  with  the  degree  of  B.A.  in 
1880.  In  1884,  after  studying  theology  at  Boston  Uni- 
versity for  two  years,  he  entered  the  Yale  School  of 
Religion.  He  was  graduated  in  1885,  and  spent  the  next 
year  at  Yale  in  graduate  study. 

He  was  ordained  to  the  Congregational  ministry  at 
North  Waterford,  Maine,  in  September,  1886,  and  preached 
there  until  1890,  when  he  returned  to  Baltimore,  where,  as 
pastor  of  the  Canton  Congregational  Church,  the  remainder 
of  his  active  ministry  was  spent.  In  1905,  he  resigned  that 
charge,  and  had  since  been  engaged  as  secretary  of  the 
Public  Bath  Commission.  He  was  the  originator,  sup- 
porter, and,  from  1893  to  191 5,  the  superintendent  of  the 
free  baths  system  of  Baltimore.  In  19 12,  he  went  as  a 
delegate  to  the  International  Conference  on  Public  and 
School  Baths  at  The  Hague. 


238  SCHOOL   OF   RELIGION 

Mr.  Beadenkoff  died  at  his  home  in  Baltimore,  September 
7,  191 5.  He  had  suffered  from  heart  trouble  for  about  a 
year. 

His  marriage  took  place  in  Baltimore,  June  20,  1899,  to 
Annie,  daughter  of  Richard  B.  and  Anne  M.  S.  Stidham, 
who  survives  him.  They  had  five  children:  Thomas  Mil- 
ton, who  died  at  birth;  Martin  Lawrence;  Anna  Lucille; 
William  Gladstone,  and  Mary  Lila. 


Frederic  Lorenzo  Stevens,  B.D.   1885 

Born  May  7,  1859,  in  St.  Johnsbury,  Vt. 
Died  November  5,  1915,  in  Rochester,  Minn. 

Frederic  Lorenzo  Stevens,  one  of  the  two  children  of 
Lorenzo  O.  and  Abiah  Welch  Stevens,  was  born  in  St. 
Johnsbury,  Vt.,  May  7,  1859.  He  received  his  early  edu- 
cation in  his  native  town  and  in  Winona,  Minn.,  his  par- 
ents having  removed  to  the  latter  town  in  his  boyhood, 
and  took  his  academic  work  at  Olivet  College,  where  he 
was  graduated  in  1882.  The  next  three  years  were  spent 
in  the  study  of  theology  at  Yale,  and  in  1885  he  was  given 
the  degree  of  B.D. 

He  began  preaching  at  Southington,  Conn.,  in  February 
of  that  year,  and  was  ordained  and  installed  as  pastor  of 
the  Southington  Congregational  Church  the  following 
December.  In  1886-87,  he  pursued  graduate  work  in  the 
Yale  School  of  Religion  on  the  Hooker  Fellowship.  On 
July  I,  1888,  he  was  dismissed  from  his  charge  at  South- 
ington, and  shortly  afterwards  sailed  for  Germany,  where 
he  passed  two  years  in  study  at  Jena,  Leipsic,  and  Berlin. 
On  his  return  to  America,  he  was  for  a  while  located  in 
New  Haven,  dividing  his  time  between  preaching  and 
literary  activities.  He  wrote  several  articles  for  the  New 
Englander.  In  1888,  he  had  prepared  the  Church  Manual 
of  Southington. 

In  1893,  his  health  being  somewhat  impaired,  he  went 
to  the  home  of  his  parents  in  Winona.  After  a  short 
rest,  he  resumed  preaching,  but  was  able  to  continue  only 
a  few  years.     Chronic  cystitis  developed,  and  after  a  long 


1885-1886  239 

illness  from  brain  trouble,  he  died  at  a  sanitarium  at 
Rochester,  Minn.,  November  5,  1915.  Burial  was  in 
Winona. 

Mr.  Stevens  was  married  September  7,  1887,  in  South- 
ington  to  Mary  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  John  and  Eunice 
Beckley  Gridley,  who  survives  him  with  their  daughter, 
Doris  Imogene,  a  non-graduate  member  of  the  Class  of 
1916  at  Mount  Holyoke  College. 


Clarence  DeVere  Greeley,  B.D.  1886 

Born  May  ig,  1856,  in  Waytie  Township,  Pa. 
Died  February  25,  1916,  in  Chicago,  111. 

Clarence  DeVere  Greeley  was  the  youngest  child  in  a 
family  of  seven,  and  was  born  in  Wayne  Township,  Pa., 
May  19,  1856.  Nathan  Barnes  Greeley,  his  father,  was 
an  only  brother  of  Horace  Greeley,  the  founder  of  the 
New  York  Tribune,  and  the  son  of  Zaccheus  and  Mary 
(Woodburn)  Greeley.  He  was  descended  from  Zaccheus 
Greeley,  who  came  from  the  north  of  Ireland  to  New 
England  with  his  two  brothers  in  1640  and  settled  near 
Nutfield  (now  Londonderry),  N.  H. 

In  1883,  upon  the  completion  of  the  regular  four-year 
course,  he  was  graduated  from  Washburn  College,  and 
from  that  year  until  1887  ^yas  enrolled  in  the  Theological 
Department  at  Yale.  He  received  the  degree  of  B.D.  in 
1886,  and  spent  the  next  year  in  graduate  work. 

He  studied  in  the  Harvard  Divinity  School  during 
1887-88,  and  after  his  ordination  to  the  ministry  of  the 
Congregational  Church,  preached  for  a  time  at  Mount 
Carmel,  Conn.  Later,  he  held  pastorates  at  Prairie  du 
Chien,  Wis.,  Braddock,  Pa.,  and  Chicago,  111.,  but  most 
of  his  time  had  been  spent  in  educational  work.  He  had 
served  as  a  lecturer  on  sociology  in  the  University  of  North 
Carolina  and  at  Washburn  College,  and  during  the  last 
few  years  of  his  life  specialized  in  functional  ethics.  He 
was  a  frequent  contributor  to  various  publications.  In 
1895,  he  received  the  degree  of  M.A.  from  Washburn,  and 
six  years  later  the  University  of  Wooster  gave  him  that 
of  Doctor  of  Philosophy. 


24°  SCHOOL   OF    RELIGION 

Dr.  Greeley  died  at  his  home  in  Chicago,  February  25, 
1916,  his  death  following  an  operation  for  bladder  trouble. 
Burial  was  in  Mount  Hope  Cemetery  in  that  city. 
^  He  was  unmarried.    A  brother,  a  sister,  and  three  half- 
sisters  survive  him. 


Richard  Owen,  B.D.   1892 

Died  April  30,  1916 

It  has  been  impossible  to  secure  the  desired  informa- 
tion for  an  obituary  sketch  of  Mr.  Owen  in  time  for  pub- 
lication in  this  volume.  A  sketch  will  appear  in  a  subse- 
quent issue  of  the  Obituary  Record. 


George  Henry  Flint,  B.D.   1893 

Born  January  25,  1865,  in  Lincoln,  Mass. 
Died  July  24,  1915,  in  Lincoln,  Mass. 

George  Henry  Flint,  son  of  George  Flint,  whose  parents 
were  Ephraim  and  Susan  (Bemis)  Flint,  was  born  in 
Lincoln,  Mass.,  January  25,  1865.  His  mother  was  Caro- 
line Amelia,  daughter  of  Henry  and  Mary  Rice. 

He  received  his  preparatory  training  at  Phillips  Acad- 
emy, Andover,  Mass.,  and  in  1882  entered  Williams  Col- 
lege. He  became  a  member  of  Phi  Beta  Kappa,  and 
graduated  with  the  degree  of  B.A.  in  1886.  The  next 
three  years  he  spent  in  teaching — -at  first  at  the  Peekskill 
(N.  Y.)  Military  Academy  and  later  at  Monson  Academy 
at  Monson,  Mass.  During  1889-90,  he  served  as  an 
assistant  in  chemistry  at  Williams,  and  in  the  latter  year 
received  the  degree  of  M.A.  there.  He  began  his  theo- 
logical studies  at  Yale  in  the  fall  of  1890. 

After  graduating  from  the  Yale  School  of  Religion  in 
1893,  he  continued  his  studies  in  New  Haven  for  a  year. 
He  then  served  for  two  years  as  assistant  pastor  of  Phillips 
Church  at  South  Boston,  Mass.,  being  placed  in  charge  of 
Phillips  Chapel.  In  1896,  he  became  pastor  of  Hope 
Chapel,  of  the  Old  South  Church,  Boston,  where  he 
remained  until  1899,  when  he  was  called  to  Central  Con- 


I 


1886-1898  241 

gregational  Church  at  Dorchester,  Mass.  Largely  through 
his  efforts,  a  new  church  edifice  was  built  during  his  pas- 
torate. Ill  health  forced  him  to  resign  the  charge  in  1914, 
and  after  spending  the  following  winter  in  Florida,  he 
returned  to  his  native  town,  where  his  death  occurred, 
from  a  complication  of  diseases,  on  July  24,  191 5.  He 
was  buried  in  the  Lincoln  Cemetery. 

Mr.  Flint  was  married  June  17,  1896,  in  Hinsdale,  Mass., 
to  Mary  P.,  daughter  of  Azariah  Smith  and  Emily  (Payne) 
Storm.  Mrs.  Flint,  who  was  a  grandniece  of  Azariah 
Smith  (B.A.  1837,  M.D.  1840)  and  of  William  Manlius 
Smith  (B.A.  1844,  M.D.  University  of  Pennsylvania  1849), 
survives  her  husband  with  two  children,  Caroline  Emily 
and  Philip  Ephraim. 


Francis  Chase  Bliss,  B.D.   1898 

Born  August  25,  1872,  in  Newport,  R.  I. 
Died  December  7,  1915 

Francis  Chase  Bliss  was  born  at  Newport,  R.  L,  August 
25,  1872.  He  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  at  Brown  Uni- 
versity in  1894,  on  completing  the  regular  four-year  course, 
and  in  the  fall  of  1895  began  his  preparation  for  the  minis- 
try in  the  Yale  School  of  Religion.  At  the  end  of  his  first 
year,  he  was  awarded  one  of  the  Fogg  Scholarships,  and 
in  1894  was  graduated  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of 
Divinity. 

In  1898,  he  went  to  Plymouth,  Wis.,  and  was  ordained 
there  the  following  August.  He  was  called  to  the  Congre- 
gational Church  at  Amery,  Wis.,  in  1901,  and  held  that 
charge  for  three  years.  From  1904  until  1910,  he  was 
located  in  North  Dakota,  his  pastorates  being  successively 
at  Highland,  Velva,  Sawyer,  Minot,  Benedict,  and  at  Ana- 
moose  and  Drake.  He  removed  to  Rockford,  Iowa,  in 
1910,  and  continued  there  until  October,  191 5,  when  he  was 
settled  over  a  church  at  New  England,  N.  Dak. 

His  death  occurred  December  7,  191 5,  from  pneumonia. 
He  was  buried  at  Fergus  Falls,  Minn. 
J^        Mr.  Bliss  was  married  in  Minneapolis,  Minn.,  July  22, 
I^B  1914,  to  Eunice  V.  Hansen,  who  survives  him. 

I 


242  SCHOOL   OF   RELIGION 


Knut  Emil  Forsell,  B.D.   1898 

Born  September  23,  1864,  in  Vexio,  Smaland,  Sweden 
Died  January  28,  1916,  in  Minneapolis,  Minn. 

Knut  Emil  Forsell  was  born  in  Vexio,  Smaland,  Sweden, 
September  23,  1864,  and  came  to  this  country  at  the  age  of 
seventeen.  He  was  educated  at  Northwestern  College, 
Minneapolis,  Minn.,  Chicago  Theological  Seminary,  and 
Carleton  College,  graduating  from  the  latter  institution 
in  1894.  In  1897,  he  came  to  New  Haven,  and  the  next 
year  was  graduated  from  the  Yale  School  of  Religion. 

For  a  time  thereafter,  he  was  editor  of  a  Swedish 
religious  paper.  Later,  he  visited  Sweden,  and  on  his 
return  was  sent  to  Alaska,  there  becoming  pastor  of  a 
church  at  Nome.  From  1903  to  1907,  he  made  his  home 
at  West  Duluth,  Minn.,  in  the  latter  year  removing  to 
Minneapolis,  where  he  preached  in  the  Swedish  Tabernacle. 
He  had  also  taught  in  the  American  Business  College  and 
Northwestern  College,  and  had  served  as  principal  of  the 
Minnehaha  Academy.  During  the  period  from  1911  to 
1913,  he  was  located  on  a  homestead  in  northern  Minne- 
sota, but  in  June,  191 5,  he  went  to  Canby,  Minn.,  where  the 
remainder  of  his  life  was  spent  as  pastor  of  the  Swedish 
Mission  Church.  Mr.  Forsell  was  the  author  of  a  "Life 
of  Missionary  Franson,"  and  "The  Free  Church  Movement 
of  America,"  and  had  translated  into  the  Swedish,  Shel- 
don's  "In  His  Steps." 

He  died  in  the  Swedish  Hospital,  Minneapolis,  January 
28,  1916,  from  chronic  myocarditis  and  nephritis,  and  was 
buried  in  West  Duluth. 

On  April  26,  1905,  he  was  married  in  that  town  to  Anna 
Beatrice,  daughter  of  L.  P.  and  Anna  C.  (Bjesse)  High- 
mark,  who  survives  him  with  five  children:  Eldon  Victor, 
Elsa  Ruth  Purdy,  George  Emil,  Beatrice  Ruby,  and  Paul 
Rueben. 


SUMMARY 


243 


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00  00  00 


244 


SUMMARY 


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pq 


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c 


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g  o  be  (^ 
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^  ^  u  u  m 


25  K 


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fc  ffi  >  Q 

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;5     00   00   00   05 


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c 


■  e"  ^  -«  .^"  ^  -p  ^ 


t^         10 


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m  (2  I  f^.  0  S  I  Q  K  f^, 

CO  «•  ^-  I^   CO   1^  *g  O  ^  ^ 
.     "5        •       .   >-^ 


^   t-"   P-l       .-'■'-   ;!=;  ,       . 

c/5  pi;  H^  ^  pq  ^  'e  d  ^  ^ 
ffi  K^  fi;  U  W  '  *  "^  ''"  '  '  ^ 


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SUMMARY 


245 


OnOnC\0\OnOnO\0\OnC>iOnO\0\0\0\0\0\OnO\0\C^O\0\0\OnO\" 


<  ^        +e     .         >    «->    H 
o  O   8 


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rt  C  rt  u.     >-.     V-.  C 

3  3  3  c^     "1     rt  3 

C  t— ,  »-  3     3     3  I— > 

oj  ^  ^  J-     C!     C 


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I>  Jt>   Jt>   J>   Jt>   Jt>   .!>  _l>  />    l-^    ■"      •" 


oooooooooooooooocooooooooooooooo 


I 


246 


SUMMARY 


•2    0\0\0\O\0\0s0s0\0\0\0\0\0\cy\0\0\0\0\0\O0\0\0\0\0\ 


►H       N       fO 


a!  d;  fo  oo' 


;^ 


a 


:3  3  § 


i>    rt    o 


ci  vn    hT  tF  tv!  CO  vp" 
M    C<    M    i-H     M    c^^     N 


3 


5>  s 


3     C     <U 

III 

i    ^• 

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lid 

•  »      1-1      r-i 


6.1 


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o 


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ns    o 

PL,   H 


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vS 


0\  "^  t^  vo    ,r  ^ 


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,    ^    en 


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<  P5  III  U  U  cj  J^  <  pq  C^"  ^'   g  ffi  pq'  K  ^  U  P^'  p4   I  ^*  P^'  !^'  ffi 


,  u  w  w  H^  d  cJ  U  cJ  cJ  ^2,  pq  p4  H^  ffi  h^  >  c/i  fe  H  d  d 


Jg    00  00  00    o\ 

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r^  00  00  00  00 


n     M     N     M     rocoi^voirjio 


ts.    IN    J^    t^ 


SUMMARY 


247 


0^0^0^0\O^C^C^O^O^O^O^O^C>lO^O^C^O\O^O^C^O^O^O^O\0\0^ 


Ui 


CO 


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fO    W     w     w 


V-i      <1J      <) 

3    g    rt 


<u 


HH-  VO-    Tf    rf  00     »^oS    ^    <S    0^    ^ 

(U 

^  ^^  ^  2 

00 

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w 

»— » 

i^   u    u    u 

>-, 

Januar 

M 

ecembe 

Ju 

Jul 

Octobe 

ptembe 

Marc 

ebruar 

ptembe 

ebruar 

rt    J=l    jD    J2 

ebru 
ecem 
ecem 
ecem 

Q                                 <U             pLn      <U    PL, 

'^QQQ 

c3 


o  -z; 
O  5 


1^   o 


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rs 


^1 


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g  u 

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t>. 

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03 

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Pl. 


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3  ^ 

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bin 
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ngt 

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s  t5  W 


u:        G 
o       -a 

jd  IS   S 

:^  -^ 


6:2;     :^  H  iz: 


JS5 


wick, 
,  44 
necke 

y,  46 

stead. 

^ 

5 

Tyler,  47 
Dayton,  42 
Heard,  39 
Hollister,  43 
nee  Winter,  . 

;t  Chad 
.  Gibbs 
I  Long€ 
1  O'Da 
ir  Bum 

pq 

OS 

u 

00 

^     ON 


«J     G 


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is 


a, 
W  P^"  ;2  Q  <  d  pq  fe  w  O 


Wc/ic/iPn'OcJ  SifqWP^I^d 


t^  n:    fo     ^ 

^   ex  (u    « 

W  'o  ^-  C/i 


,  ffi  ffi  <  izi  ^'  ffi  m  K 


^ 


.S 


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^  -S  ^ 
J  p4  fLi 


I 


oO(^^<^i^^(S'oo^^(%^^^^^0\6\S^S^S\S\BsO\S\0\ 


248 


SUMMARY 


\0  vo    m  VO 

0\   On   a\  Oi 


C^c^C^o^C^O^C^c^c^c^C^o^c^C^c^o^C^c^o^ 


Q      3 


X^   O    On  VO 
^    ^    V-    ^ 

OS  "^     g    S 


00"  CO  d\  ol  of  ro  pf 


o 


>>  .    rs 


tx  hT  f6  00" 


t<:  c' 


L' 

L' 

>.  ^i' 

>, 

<u 

>»  «- 

■  r! 

+j 

i_ 

ci 

J^ 

^  >, 

3 

a 
< 

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3 

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t— »    0 

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ffl    <L>  ^  "si  3 

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m 


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to 

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o 


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J2   6  ^ 

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1^ 


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rt  bo 

K  3  C 

C  1  .- 

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03     o 


a:  K  H^  U  K  -3  ^  ^  ^  p;  K  ^  d 


.  ^  J        fi;  K  haU  ffi  I  ^  ^  ^  p;  K  ^  d  I  -g  «  <  <  o 

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SUMMARY 


249 


10 

MD^OMDvo    mvo    mmvo    m 

\D    ^   \0 

VO    10    10   10 

vo 

On  On 

l-H         l-l         1-1 

hH 

o\ 

Oi0nQ\0\0\0\0\O\0\0n 

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On    On    0\    On 

ON 

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HH        l-H 

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ci   i-T  Tf  10   'rf   -"^  00"   hT  00"   i-T 

':^  d\  ^ 

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CO 

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0 

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Septemb 

Janu 

Decem 

Novem 

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Novemb 

3 

w 


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l-H       CTS 
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r  o  cj 


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1 

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1 

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rt 

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250 


SUMMARY 


vo    irj  to  »o  vn  VD    lo 

"S    0\0\0n0\0nO\O\ 


lo  vo  lo  in  lo  >o  lo  lo  to  vo  m  lo  in  -^  lo 

0^0\C^O^O^O^O^<^C^O^O^C^C^C^O\ 


»n(» 

^. 

H-l 

l-H 

*"' 

^ 

hH        M        M 

t-l        M        M        M        M 

'- 

Q  in 

I< 

i<  in   hT 

cf  i<  -^  fn  m" 

in  in  vo    fo   >-( 

i-( 

V4        0) 

N 

<X 

M 

(N       M 

HI        M        01                     t-l 

w     (N     (N             C^ 

o 

u, 

>> 

Ui 

t- 

S-g 

Ui      CJ 

>> 

4-1 

>^ 

Cfl 

j_ 

C    1-     u, 

U,      V-      J-,      <L>      J- 

>,    Vh     -M     (U      u. 

trt 

OJ    03 

cn 

03 

3 

OJ 

rt    <u    <u 

4)      <U      <U    J3      (U 

U,      <L)      t"    ^      OJ 

3 

3 
1— , 

3 
< 

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6 

1^2 

03    ^    XI      C    ^ 

s  E  e  s  s 

anua 
cemb 
Augu 
ecem 
cemb 

(U    *; 

v 

03     (U      o 

<U      <L»      OJ      CJ      OJ 

o   a 

^  ^O 

>    >    a    <u    > 

a;    a> 

Cu 

O    o  ^  Q    O 

^a   oo 

Q  w 

<u 

Q 

1-1     (U 


tf  -o  iz;  -T^ 


-z    O    > 
S   ex  o 


ffl  gu 


•r;u 


ffiu^ 


O     03 


<U      rt      <U      !U 

1^  w  :^  ^ 


o 
U 

^'' 
o 

o  >f;>H* 


C  C 

c  c 

o  o 

U  U 


O 


<u  x; 

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P^   5 


cPM 


>   > 

rt    rt 


c  c 

c  c 

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rt    O 


^  m 


2)^ 


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1^     ^ 

w  ;z: 


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^  ^"^Iz; 


rt 
_P 


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rt       x: 


>^  M  Iz; 


lijl 

U  -^  -S 

l-H       > 

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1    ^ 


^  I  K  W  fe  ^_  <■  o 
;S  (ij  pl;  d  U  ^  fe  H^ 


rt     c 

6  [^ 


00 

t« 

vo 

u> 

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x: 
o 

.^« 


00^ 


0\ 
00     ^ 


(^ 


ro 


^     rt     ^    ^     ^        . 

^    c    ^    ^  ^    o 


<  c/i 


c^;  '"7  '-^  d  ^*  ^  ^*  ^  ^'  ^ 
w  ^  ^  H^  Ph'  P  d  ^  w  d 


y^  \o   (s  vo   r^  tx  r^ 
in  m  i^  t^  j^  r^  ix 

00    00   00    00    00    00    00 


SUMMARY 


251 


VO  VO 

10 

o\  o\ 

o\ 

i-i 

d;  fo 

in 

l-H     c< 

<u 

.-;::   >> 

C 

U>         «H 

3 

a   rt 

t— » 

<    g 

rt 

lO»n^ovo^o^D^OlOu^lr)\o^lOlovo       <i> 

0^C^C^C\O^O^0^C^0^O^0^O^0^O\0^      <u 


Pk 


OJ     O 


O     C 


C    a; 

O       HH 


to  10  10  to  VO  VO  00 

1^    r^    t>»    t^    l^    In.    In, 

00   00   00   00   00   00   00 


iisriDEzx: 


Members  of  the  Scientific  and  Graduate  Schools,  and  of  the  Schools  of  Lazv,  Medicine, 
and  Religion  are  indicated  by  the  letters  s,  ma  or  dp,  I  or  ml,  m,  and  d,  respectively. 


Class 

Page 

Class 

Page 

j866 

Adams,  Charles  H. 

62 

i860 

Delafield,  Francis 

32 

1895^ 

Adams,  Thatcher  M.,  Jr 

.   183 

1856 

Denniston,  James   0. 

19 

1886 

Ames,  Henry  Semple 

116 

1909  J 

Denton,   William   B. 

195 

1873 

Ashley,  Clarence  D. 

84 

1885  m 

Dibble,  Charles  F. 

205 

1839 

Atwater,  David  F. 

I 

1864 

Dibble,  Orson  G. 

57 

1914 

Dickey,  W.  Grant 

157 

1863 

Barnard,  Frederick  J. 

48 

1901 

Doudge,  Barton  T. 

149 

1885 

Barnes,  Jonathan 

no 

1896^ 

Downs,  Hubert  C. 

184 

1862 

Barnum,  Henry  S. 

45 

i86gs 

DuBois,  A,  Jay 

162 

1870 

Beach,  Walter  R. 

76 

1861 

Durfee,  Henry  R. 

37 

188s  d 

Beadenkoff,   Thomas  M 

237 

1849 

Dwight,  Timothy 

5 

1867 

Beard,  Henry  B. 

63 

1S89S 

Beckley,  William  B. 

177 

1889/ 

Eames,  Harris  G. 

219 

185 1 

Bedinger,  Everett  W. 

10 

1847 

Edmands,  John 

4 

1880/ 

Beecher,  William  J. 

219 

1874  s 

Edwards,   Franklin 

166 

1878 

Benton,  Edwin  A. 

99 

1905  w 

Elmes,  Frank  A. 

207 

igogs 

Bernhardi,  John  F. 

194 

1897^ 

Ely,  Franklin  J. 

187 

1898  d 

Bliss,   Francis   C. 

241 

1877  dp 

Boals,  John  C, 

201 

1875  s 

Fenn,  Charles  W. 

167 

1BS2S 

Bozeman,   Nathan   G. 

173 

1854 

Fenn,  William  H. 

17 

1865 

Brown,  John  C. 

60 

1893  d 

FHnt,   George  H. 

240 

1876  d 

Bugbee,  Rolla  G. 

233 

1882 

Foote,  Carlton  A. 

107 

189s 

Bumstead,  Arthur 

132 

1871 

Ford,  Isaac  H. 

81 

1898 

Burnet,  Jacob  B. 

141 

i8g8d 

Forsell,  Knut  E. 

242 

I  goo 

Butler,  Albert  N. 

144 

1874 

Foster,  Frank  W. 

90 

1895 

Butler,  George  E. 

134 

i860 

Foster,  William  E. 

34 

1888 

Fowler,  George  B. 

124 

1895 

Cable,  Benjamin  S 

135 

^^1 

Francis,  Cyrus  W. 

49 

1887 

Caldwell,  Victor  B. 

119 

1876 

Frew,  William  N. 

91 

189I 

Calhoun,  Gouverneur 

126 

1861 

Frost,  Milton 

39 

1853 

Catlin,  Lynde  A. 

15 

189I 

Chadwick,  Ernest 

127 

1864  m 

Gallagher,  Frank 

202 

I9OI 

Chappell,  Harold 

148 

1858 

Garrard,  Jeptha 

20 

1876  J 

Clark,  Sidney  W. 

168 

19T1  s 

Geddes,  Walter  M. 

197 

1887 

Cobb,  Sanford  E. 

121 

1893 

Gibbs,  Rufus  M. 

129 

1887 

Cochrane,  Francis 

122 

1863 

Glasgow,  Edward  B. 

51 

1898 

Cogswell,  Henry   B. 

142 

1858 

Grant,  Edward  D. 

21 

1900 

Conner,  Norman  G. 

145 

j886d 

Greeley,  Clarence  DeV. 

239 

187I 

Coonley,  Edgar  D. 

80 

1888  s 

Greer,  Howard,  Jr. 

175 

1865 

Cooper,  James  W. 

61 

'^^ 

Corwith,  Charles  R. 

109 

1901/ 

Hallen,  Edward  T. 

223 

1867  m 

Cragin,  George  E. 

204 

1883 

Harkness,  Charles  W. 

109 

1897^ 

Cristy,  James  C. 

185 

185 1 

Harlow,  William  T. 

12 

1879  s 

Harrison,  Frank  H. 

172 

1878  rf 

Darling,   Thomas  W. 

235 

1882 

Hawkes,   Charles   B. 

108 

1896 

Dayton,  Estey  F. 

137 

1879 

Haynie,  Edwin  C. 

102 

INDEX 


253 


Class 

Page 

Class 

Page 

1896 

Heard,  Carlos  C. 

138 

1894 

O'Day,  Daniel 

131 

i860 

Higgins,   Lucius   H. 

35 

1892  d 

Owen,  Richard 

240 

1868 

Hill,  Beach 

65 

1903 

Hitchcock,  Charles,  Jr. 

149 

1879  s 

Paramore,  Frederick  W 

.   172 

1896 

Hollister,  John  C. 

139 

1868 

Parry,  Samuel 

68 

1864 

Hopkins,  Theodore  W. 

57 

1864 

Peck,  William  G. 

59 

1876 

Home,  Durbin 

93 

1866  m 

Peckham,  Fenner  H. 

202 

1876  (/ 

Horner,  John  W. 

234 

1858 

Peirce,  Luther  H. 

23 

1850 

Horton,  Benjamin  J. 

9 

1887 

Penrose,  Thomas  N. 

123 

1877/ 

Hotchkiss,  Justus  S. 

214 

1885 

Phelps,  Edward  B. 

113 

1870^ 

Humphrey,  Henry  C. 

163 

1875  d 

Piatt,  Lester  B. 

230 

1885 

Hunter,  Ernest  H. 

112 

1867 

Porter,  P.  Brynberg 

64 

1890 

Hutchinson,  Otis  K. 

125 

1869 

Prudden,  Theodore  P. 

72> 

1876 

Hyde,  William  Waldo 

94 

1894^ 

Ranney,  Abram  N. 

181 

1875  rf 

Jackson,  William  T. 

229 

1877  s 

Read,  Francis  R. 

171 

1891/ 

Jarboe,  Paul  R. 

220 

1851/ 

Robert,  Alexander  J. 

210 

1883  d 

Jeffries,  William  E. 

236 

1872/ 

Robinson,  Frank  A. 

213 

1873 

Robson,  James  A. 

88 

1909  dp 

Kawanaka,  Kannosukc 

201 

1864  J 

Roffe,  Albert  H. 

161 

1899/ 

Keane,  William  C. 

223 

1875  d 

Root,  Edward  P. 

231 

1870 

Kelly,  Robert 

77 

1872  s 

Russell,  Thomas  H. 

164 

1893/ 

Kendall,   Ulysses   S. 

221 

1861 
1876  s 

Kitchel,  Harvey  S. 
Kohn,   Solomon   S, 

40 
169 

1914        Safford,  Geoffrey  L. 
1909  ml  Sanchez,  Proceso  G. 

159 
227 

1900  J 

Lauder,  George,  Jr. 

188 

1844 

Savage,  George  S.  F. 

3 

1893  J 
1888^ 

Lawbaugh,  Elmer  A. 
LeSassier,  Louis 

179 
1/6 

1909^ 
1886 

Schall,  James  E.,  Jr. 
Schwab,  John  C. 

195 
117 

1894  J 

Lilley,  Mitchell  C. 

1  /u 

180 

1868 

Seagrave,  Francis  E. 

69 

1910/ 

Lincoln,  Ralph  H. 

225 

1861 

Sears,  Lorenzo 

42 

1894 
igois 

Longenecker,  Ralph 
Luther,   Chorbajian   M, 

130 

189 

1878 
1894  J 
1863 

Shaw,   Charles  H. 
Sheffield,  George 
Shepard,  Charles  U. 

lOI 

181 

52 

1901 

McAuley,  Henry  S. 

149 

1890 

Sherwood,  John  H. 

125 

1878 

McEwan,  James  B. 

100 

1906 

Shevlin,  Thomas  L. 

152 

1909 

McKiernan,  Charles   P. 

154 

1856/ 

Shiras,    Oliver    P. 

211 

1910 

Malony,  John  C. 

208 

1907 

Shirk,  John  E. 

153 

1877/ 

Meeker,  Edward  F. 

216 

1853 

Smalley,  George  W. 

16 

1877 

Merrifield,   Webster 

97 

1881 

Smith,     John  C. 

104 

I909?»a  Messick,  Joseph  C. 

200 

1907/ 

Snow,  George  G. 

224 

1908^ 

Miller,  Winfield  C. 

19^ 

1909 

Spitzer,  Roland  A. 

156 

1877/ 

Mills,  WilHam  J. 

217 

1861 

Stanton,  Charles  T. 

44 

•  1873 

Minor,   S.   Carrington 

87 

1885  c/ 

Stevens,  Frederic  L. 

238 

i  1868 

Moore,   Frank 

66 

1888  w 

Stowe,  William  H. 

206 

1856  J 

Morehouse,   Louis   P. 

160 

1849 

Morris,  Edward  D. 

7 

1859 

Tatum,  Joseph  T. 

26 

1  1894/ 

Mull,  George  F. 

222 

1862 

Taylor,  John  P. 

47 

1  1909 

Murchey,   Karl  E. 

155 

1851 

Temple,  David  P. 

14 

Pi 

1869 

Thomas,  Aaron  S. 

74 

8 1858 

Neide,  Horace 

22 

187s  d 

Thompson,  Albert  H. 

232 

1859 

Newton,  Homer  G. 

24 

1911/ 

Tierney,  Harold  E. 

226 

191 1 J 

Norton,  Edward  H. 

198 

1915J 

Tiesing,  Paul  E.  M. 

199 

I 


254 


INDEX 


Class 

1885  Townsend,  Joseph  H. 

1900  Tracy,  William  E. 

1895  Tyler,  Fred  S. 

1876/  Tyler,  George  A. 

i860  Vandyne,  Charles  H. 

1868  Viele,  Sheldon  T. 

1870  Vincent,  Frank 

1881  Wallace,  George  M. 

1863  Wallis,  Hamilton 

1880  Ward,  Edwin  C. 

1899  Warner,  Horace  B. 


Page 

Class 

115 

igios 

146 

1904 

136 

1873 

214 

1859 

1897 

3(> 

I87I 

70 

1892  J 

79 

1859 

1902^ 

105 

55 

1876 

103 

igoys 

143 

1859 

Page 

Warner,  Winfred   C.  196 

Warren,  Bronson  M.  151 

Whittaker,  William  H.  89 

Winn,  Henry  26 

Winter,  Clarence  140 

Wood,  Cortlandt  83 

Wood,  Walter  A.  178 

Wright,  Arthur  W.  28 

Wright-Clark,  John  J,  191 

Young,  Herbert  S.  96 

Young,  Ralph  W.  192 

Yundt,  Edwin  H.  31 


OBITUARY  RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES  OF  YALE  UNIVERSITY 

Deceased  during  the  year  ending 
JULY  h  1917 


INCLUDING  THE   RECORD   OF   A    FEW    WHO    DIED    PREVIOUSLY 
HITHERTO    UNREPORTED 


[No.  2  of  the  Seventh  Printed  Series,  and  No.  76  of  the  whole   Record.-  The 
present  Series  consists  of  iive  numbers.] 


I 


'/-' 


OBITUARY  RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES  OF  YALE  UNIVERSITY 

Deceased  during  the  year  etidifig 
July  i,  1917, 

Including  the  Record  of  a  few  who  died  previously,  hitherto  unreported 

[No.  2  of  the  Seventh  Printed  Series,  and  No.  76  of  the  whole  Record. 
The  present  Series  consists  of  five  numbers.] 


YALE  COLLEGE 
(academic  department) 

Robert  Hall  Smith,  B.A.  1846 

Born  February  29,  1828,  in  Baltimore,  Md. 
Died  September  11,  1915,  on  Spesutia  Island,  Harford  County,  Md. 

Robert  Hall  Smith  was  the  son  of  Samuel  W.  and  Elinor 
(Donnell)  Smith,  and  was  born  February  29,  1828,  in 
Baltimore,  Md.  Through  his  father,  whose  parents  were 
Robert  and  Margaret  Smith,  he  traced  his  descent  from 
Samuel  Smith,  who  came  to  this  country  from  Ballema- 
goragh,  Ireland,  in  1728,  settling  at  Donegal,  Lancaster 
County,  Pa.  His  mother  was  the  daughter  of  John  and 
Anne  (Smith)  Donnell. 

He  was  prepared  for  college  at  a  private  school  in  Balti- 
more County,  and  entered  Yale  as  a  Sophomore  in  1843, 
receiving  his  degree  with  the  Class  of  1846. 

After  graduation  he  became  engaged  in  farming  on 
Spesutia  Island  in  Harford  County,  Md.,  where  he  con- 
tinued to  make  his  home  until  his  death,  September  11, 
191 5,  which  resulted  from  infirmities  incident  to  his  age. 
Interment  was  in  Westminster  Cemetery,  Baltimore.  He 
was  a  member  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal  Church. 


256  YALE    COLLEGE 

His  marriage  took  place  December  12,  1861,  in  Harford 
County,  to  Mary  M.,  daughter  of  Andrew  Hall.  They 
had  five  children:  Robert  Hall;  Anna  Moore,  now  the 
wife  of  Chapman  Stuart  Clark  of  Ferryman,  Md. ;  John 
Donnell,  whose  death  occurred  January  19,  1870,  at  the 
age  of  three  years;  Julian  Chatard,  and  John  Donnell. 
Mr.  Smith's  brother,  John  Donnell  Smith,  graduated  from 
the  College  in  1847  J  he  served  with  the  Confederate  Army 
during  the  Civil  War,  ranking  as  a  captain  at  its  close. 


Charles  Selden,  B.A.   1848 

Born  June  25,  1827,  in  Liverpool,  England 
Died  May  4,  191 5,  at  Kings  Park,  N.  Y. 

Charles  Selden,  son  of  David  and  Gertrude  Elizabeth 
(Richards)  Selden,  was  born  June  25,  1827,  in  Liverpool, 
England,  where  his  father,  a  merchant,  was  then  engaged 
in  business.  The  latter  was  the  son  of  Rev.  David  Selden, 
a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1782,  and  Cynthia  (May) 
Selden;  his  wife's  father  was  Abraham  Richards.  Charles 
Selden's  great-grandfather.  Rev.  Eleazar  May  (B.A. 
1752),  was  the  son  of  Deacon  Hezekiah  May  and  Anne 
(Stillman)  May  of  Wethersfield,  Conn.,  and  a  nephew  of 
Benjamin  Stillman  (B.A.  1724)  ;  he  married  Sibyl,  daugh- 
ter of  Deacon  Samuel  Huntington,  and  sister  of  Rev. 
Eliphalet  Huntington  (B.A.  1759),  and  had  two  sons  who 
graduated  from  Yale — John  May  in  1777  and  Hezekiah 
May  in  1793. 

He  received  his  preparatory  training  at  the  Hopkins 
Grammar  School  in  New  Haven,  Conn.,  and  entered  Yale 
in  1843.  He  joined  the  Class  with  which  he  was  gradu- 
ated at  the  beginning  of  its  Freshman  year,  and  in  the 
fall  after  receiving  his  B.A.  degree  returned  to  New  Haven 
to  take  up  the  study  of  law  at  Yale. 

In  May,  1849,  ^^  went  to  a  health  resort  at  Brattle- 
boro,  Vt.,  where  a  year  was  spent.  He  then  served  for  a 
time  as  a  clerk  for  his  father  in  New  York  City,  and 
was  afterwards  employed  in  various  business  houses  there, 
later  going  to  California  to  look  after  the  affairs  of  a 
coftcern  having  mining  interests   in   Placer   County.     His 


1846-1849  257 

death  occurred  May  4,  1915,  at  Kings  Park,  N.  Y.,  where 
he  had  been  hving  for  some  years. 

He  was  first  married  June  5,  1856,  to  Georgiana  Lane, 
daughter  of  James  Vandenbergh  of  New  York  City.  She 
died  May  8,  1857,  and  on  November  9,  1865,  Mr.  Selden 
married  her  sister,  Emily  Bloomfield  Vandenbergh.  By 
his  first  marriage,  he  had  one  daughter,  Georgiana  Lane 
(Selden)  McCall,  who  is  now  living  in  Albany,  N.  Y. 
Two  of  Mr.  Selden's  brothers,  Edward  David  and  Silas 
Richards  Selden,  graduated  from  the  College  in  1844  ^^^ 
1845,  respectively,  and  his  nephew,  Robert  William  Selden, 
in  1880. 


Theodore  Henry  Hittell,  B.A.   1849 

Born  April  5,  1830,  in  Marietta,  Pa. 
Died  February  23,  1917,  in  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Theodore  Henry  Hittell  was  the  son  of  Dr.  Jacob  Hittell 
and  Catharine  (Shertzer)  Hittell,  and  was  born  April  5, 
1830,  in  Marietta,  Pa.  Before  joining  the  Yale  Class  of 
1849  as  a  Senior,  he  spent  three  years  at  Miami  University. 

In  1850  he  began  the  study  of  law  in  Cincinnati,  Ohio, 
and  two  years  later  was  admitted  to  the  bar  of  that  state. 
After  practicing  in  Hamilton,  Ohio,  for  three  years,  he 
removed,  in  October,  1855,  to  San  Francisco.  His  first 
work  in  California  was  as  a  reporter  for  his  brother,  John 
S.  Hittell,  editor  of  the  San  Francisco  Chronicle,  and  he  was 
later  on  the  staffs  of  the  Evening  Bulletin  and  the  Times. 
In  1 86 1  he  opened  law  offices  in  San  Francisco,  for  a  time 
being  associated  in  practice  with  Mr.  Elisha  Cook.  As 
attorney  for  the  "outside  land"  cases,  Mr.  Hittell  induced 
owners  of  land  outside  the  pueblo  of  San  Francisco  to  give 
1,000  acres  to  the  city  for  park  purposes.  Their  gift  is 
the  present  Golden  Gate  Park.  Mr.  Hittell  served  as  a 
member  of  the  California  State  Senate  from  1880  to  1882. 
He  had  always  given  much  time  to  writing,  and  was  the 
author  of  "The  Adventures  of  James  Capen  Adams, 
Mountaineer  and  Grizzly  Bear  Hunter  of  California" 
(i860),  "The  General  Laws  of  California,  from  1850 
to  1864,  inclusive"  (1864),  "Hittell's  Civil  Practice," 
"Nevada  Supreme  Court  Reports,"  "Hittell's  Code  and 
Statutes  of  the  State  of  CaUfornia"    (two  volumes;    1876), 


258  YALE   COLLEGE 

a  supplement  to  the  last  named,  published  in  1880,  and 
"A  Memorial  Address  on  Bancroft  and  his  Services  to 
CaHfornia"  (1883).  For  many  years  he  was  engaged  on 
a  "History  of  California,"  two  volumes  of  which  appeared 
in  1885  and  the  remaining  two  in  1897,  He  completed 
an  exhaustive  "History  of  Hawaii"  several  months  before 
his  death,  and  his  children  are  planning  to  publish  this. 
Mr.  Hittell  was  an  honorary  member  of  the  Society  of 
California  Pioneers.  He  died  at  his  home  in  San  Francisco, 
February  23,  19 17. 

Mr.  Hittell  was  married  June  12,  1858,  to  Eliza  C.  Wiehe 
of  San  Francisco.  Of  their  four  children,  three  survive — 
Catharine  Hermanna,  a  graduate  of  the  University  of 
California  in  1882;  Charles  Jacob,  who  attended  that 
institution  from  1879  to  1 881  and  afterwards  studied  paint- 
ing abroad,  and  Franklin  Theodore.  A  son,  John  Jacob, 
died  in  infancy. 


Augustus  Hart  Carrier,  B.A.   185 1 

Born  March  2,  1831,  in  Canton,  Conn. 
Died  September  12,  1916,  in  Santa  Barbara,  Calif. 

Augustus  Hart  Carrier  was  born  in  Canton,  Conn., 
March  2,  1831.  His  paternal  ancestors  came  from  England 
to  Salem,  Mass.,  early  in  the  seventeenth  century ;  members 
of  the  family  later  removed  to  Connecticut,  one  branch 
settling  in  that  section  of  Hartford  County  afterwards 
called  Canton.  On  the  maternal  side,  he  was  of  German 
and  English  descent,  some  of  his  ancestors  having  come 
to  America  from  the  vicinity  of  Frankfurt-am-Main  about 
1780. 

He  received  his  preparatory  training  at  the  cottage 
school  of  Rev.  Henry  Jones  (B.A.  1820)  in  Bridgeport, 
Conn.  At  Yale  he  was  awarded  a  Berkeley  premium  in 
Latin  composition  in  Freshman  year,  a  first  prize  in  English 
composition  the  following  year,  and  a  First  Dispute  appoint- 
ment at  graduation.  He  was  a  member  of  the  editorial 
board  of  the  Yale  Literary  Magazine,  served  successively 
as  treasurer  and  president  of  Linonia,  and  was  one  of  the 
Commencement  speakers. 

The  year  following  his  graduation  Mr.  Carrier  spent  as 


1849-1851  259 

a  teacher  at  the  Monson  (Mass.)  Academy.  He  then 
went  to  Georgia  for  his  heaUh,  and  while  there  continued 
his  studies  and  did  a  Httle  private  tutoring.  In  the  fall 
of  1853,  after  teaching  Latin  and  geometry  for  a  term  at 
Lawrence  Academy,  Groton,  Mass.,  he  entered  Andover 
Theological  Seminary,  where  he  studied  for  a  year.  On 
June  6,  1855,  he  was  licensed  to  preach,  being  ordained 
to  the  ministry  of  the  Congregational  Church  in  New 
Haven  the  following  January.  His  first  charge  was  that 
of  the  Presbyterian  Church  at  Paris,  Ky.,  where  he  was 
located  for  a  year.  From  1858  to  1863  he  served  as  pastor 
of  a  church  of  the  same  denomination  at  North  East,  Pa., 
and  during  the  next  three  years  held  the  pastorate  of  the 
Auburndale  (Mass.)  Congregational  Church.  In  1867  he 
went  to  Minneapolis,  Minn.,  in  the  hope  that  the  climate 
would  benefit  his  wife's  health,  and,  after  preaching  for 
several  months  at  the  Congregational  Church,  was  called 
to  the  pastorate  of  the  First  Presbyterian  Church.  Going 
from  Minneapolis  in  1871  to  the  First  Presbyterian  Church, 
Erie,  Pa.,  he  passed  the  next  eight  years  as  pastor  of  the 
latter  church.  For  a  few  months  after  resigning  that 
charge  he  supplied  the  Presbyterian  Church  in  Grand 
Rapids,  Mich.  In  1879  he  became  pastor  of  the  Fourth 
Presbyterian  Church  of  Indianapolis,  Ind.,  serving  that 
church  until  1885,  when  he  went  abroad.  After  a  semester 
spent  at  the  University  of  Berlin,  he  traveled  for  several 
months,  returning  to  the  United  States  in  1886  to  assume 
the  pastorate  of  the  First  Presbyterian  Church  at  Santa 
Barbara,  Calif.  His  home  had  been  in  that  city  ever  since, 
but  for  the  last  fifteen  years  of  his  life  he  had  not  been 
actively  engaged  in  the  ministry,  having  been  pastor  emeri- 
tus of  the  First  Presbyterian  Church  since  1901.  In  1885 
Wabash  College  conferred  the  honorary  degree  of  Doctor 
of  Divinity  upon  Mr.  Carrier.  His  death  occurred  in 
Santa  Barbara,  September  12,  1916. 

He  was  married  in  Wheeling,  W.  Va.,  April  2,  1857,  to 
vSusan  Ann  Bandelle,  by  whom  he  had  three  children: 
Augustus  Stiles,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1879  and  of 
Hartford  Theological  Seminary  in  1884,  who  received  the 
honorary  degrees  of  D.D.  and  LL.D.  from  Parsons  College 
in  1893  and  1913,  respectively,  and  who  is  now  a  member 
of  the  faculty  at  McCormick  Theological  Seminary,  Chi- 
cago;  a  daughter  who  died  in  1876,  and  Charles  Frederic 


2  6o  YALE    COLLEGE 

(B.A.    Harvard    1885),  whose   death   occurred   a  year   or 
so  ago.     Mrs.  Carrier  died  in  1894. 


George  Reginald  Heber  Hughes,  B.A.   185 1 

Born  November  25,  1832,  in  Baltimore,  Md. 
Died  June  22,  1914,  in  Chicago,  111. 

It  has  been  impossible  to  secure  the  desired  information 
for  an  obituary  sketch  of  Mr.  Hughes  in  time  for  publica- 
tion in  this  volume.  A  sketch  will  appear  in  a  subsequent 
issue  of  the  Obituary  Record. 


John  Rogers  Thurston,  B.A.   185 1 

Bprn  September  4,  1831,  in  Bangor,  Maine 
Died  October  20,  1916,  in  Worcester,  Mass. 

John  Rogers  Thurston  was  born  in  Bangor,  Maine,  Sep- 
tember 4,  1 83 1.  His  parents,  John  Thurston,  a  farmer, 
and  Abigail  King  (Lawrence)  Thurston,  both  dying  when 
he  was  two  years  of  age,  he  was  adopted  by  an  aunt,  with 
whom  he  made  his  home  in  Bangor.  John  R.  Thurston 
was  the  grandson  of  David  and  Chloe  (Redington)  Thurs- 
ton and  of  Rogers  and  Frances  (Hancock)  Lawrence.  On 
the  paternal  side,  he  was  descended  from  Daniel  Thurston, 
who  emigrated  to  this  country. in  1635  fi'om  Gloucestershire, 
England,  settling  at  Newbury,  Mass.,  and  from  Abraham 
Redington,  Richard  Kimball,  Allan  Perley,  Francis  Pea- 
body,  Reginald  Foster,  John  Dresser,  Joseph  Jewett,  and 
William  Law,  all  early  settlers  in  Essex  County,  Mass. 
His  maternal  ancestors  included  John  Lawrence,  of  Gro- 
ton,  Mass.,  Daniel  King,  of  Lynn,  Mass.,  Nathaniel  Rogers 
and  Jonathan  Wade,  of  Ipswich,  Mass.,  and  Nathaniel 
Hancock,  of  Cambridge,  Mass.,  all  of  whom  came  to  this 
country  between  1630  and  1640. 

He  was  fitted  for  college  at  the  Bangor  High  School, 
and  in  Freshman  year  at  Yale  was  given  a  second  prize 
in  mathematics.  He  was  graduated  in  1851  with  Phi  Beta 
Kappa  rank,  having  received  Oration  appointments. 


1851  26l 

From  185 1  to  1855  Mr.  Thurston  taught  in  the  classical 
department  of  the  school  conducted  by  James  Betts  at 
Norwalk,  Conn.  During  the  first  year  of  the  period  he 
also  pursued  graduate  studies  at  Yale.  Entering  Bangor 
Theological  Seminary  in  1855,  he  graduated  there  three 
years  afterwards.  His  intention  had  been  to  go  as  a  mis- 
sionary to  China,  and,  in  fact,  he  had  received  an  appoint- 
ment from  the  American  Board  of  Commissioners  for 
Foreign  Missions.  A  subsequent  change  in  his  plans 
caused  him  to  accept  a  call  to  be  associate  pastor  of  the 
First  Congregational  Church  at  Newbury,  Mass.  There 
he  was  ordained  and  installed  in  January,  1859,  and,  with 
the  exception  of  a  few  months  spent  in  the  service  of  the 
Christian  Commission  at  the  time  of  the  Civil  War, 
j)reached  there  until  January,  1870,  being  the  colleague  of 
Rev.  Leonard  Withington  (B.A.  1814),  for  many  years 
the  pastor.  His  second  and  last  pastorate  was  at  Whitins- 
ville,  Mass.,  where  he  was  located  from  April,  1871,  to 
July,  191 1. 

Since  his  retirement  in  the  latter  year,  Mr.  Thurston  had 
lived  in  Worcester,  Mass.,  where  he  died,  from  old  age, 
October  20,  1916.  His  body  was  taken  to  Whitinsville  for 
burial  in  Pine  Grove  Cemetery. 

He  was  married  in  Orrington,  Maine,  September  4,  1858, 
to  Frances  Orella,  daughter  of  Walter  and  Elizabeth 
(Hincks)  Goodale.  Three  children  were  born  to  them: 
Walter  Lawrence,  who  died  in  infancy;  Margaret  Mead, 
now  the  wife  of  Oilman  DuBois  Frost  (B.A.  Dartmouth 
1886,  M.D.  Harvard  and  Dartmouth  1892),  and  Elizabeth 
Ooodale,  whose  death  occurred  in  October,  1895.  Mrs. 
Thurston  died  February  21,  1868,  and  on  March  16,  1871, 
Mr.  Thurston  married  in  New  York  City,  Caroline  Augusta 
Welles,  daughter  of  Charles  W.  and  Elizabeth  (Burnham) 
Storey,  who  survives  him.  They  had  five  children :  Charles 
Storey,  who  graduated  from  Yale  College  in  1895  and 
from  the  Harvard  Law  School  in  1898;  John  Lawrence 
(died  May  10,  1904),  who  received  the  degree  of  B.A. 
from  Yale  in  1898  and  that  of  B.D.  from  Hartford  Theo- 
logical Seminary  in  1902;  Caroline,  who  died  in  infancy; 
Flelen,  whose  death  occurred  when  she  was  four  and  a 
half  years  of  age,  and  Lsabel  Storey  (B.A.  Mount  Holvoke 
IQ02).  Mr.  Thurston  was  a  cousin  of  Edward  Buck  (B.A. 
1852),  a  sketch  of  whose  life  follows. 


262  YALE    COLLEGE 


Edward  Buck,  B. A.   1852 

Born  April  17,  1829,  in  Orland,  Maine 
Died  April  6,  1917,  in  Bucksport,  Maine 

Edward  Buck,  whose  parents  were  John  Buck,  a  mer- 
chant, and  Sarah  (Thurston)  Buck,  was  born  in  Orland, 
Maine,  April  17,  1829.  His  father  was  the  son  of  Ben- 
jamin and  Sarah  (Sewall)  Buck,  and  a  descendant  of 
Wilham  Buck,  who  came  to  this  country  from  England  in 
1635  and  settled  at  Cambridge,  Mass.  His  great-great- 
grandfather, Jonathan  Buck,  removed  from  Haverhill, 
Mass.,  in  1762  to  Plantation  No.  i  on  the  Penobscot  River, 
which  was  named  Buckstown  (since  changed  to  Bucks- 
port)  in  his  honor;  he  held  a  colonel's  commission  in  the 
Revolutionary  War.  His  mother's  parents  were  David  and 
Chloe  (Redington)  Thurston.  She  traced  her  descent  to 
Daniel  Thurston,  who  emigrated  to  America  from  Eng- 
land in  1635,  settling  at  Newbury,  Mass. 

He  received  his  preparatory  training  at  Phillips  Acad- 
emy, Andover,  Mass.,  and,  after  first  entering  Bowdoin 
College,  joined  the  Class  of  1852  at  the  beginning  of  the 
third  term  of  Freshman  year.  He  was  one  of  the  speakers 
at  Junior  Exhibition,  received  Oration  appointments,  and 
belonged  to  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 

After  graduation  Mr.  Buck  entered  the  Bangor  Theo- 
logical Seminary,  where  he  was  a  student  for  three  years. 
He  subsequently  preached  in  various  towns  in  Maine,  and 
was  a  chaplain  for  a  time  in  the  Civil  War.  Shortly  after 
the  war  he  retired  from  the  ministry,  and  engaged  in  the 
lumber  business,  being  associated  with  his  father  until  1872. 
His  home  for  nearly  fifty  years  had  been  in  Bucksport, 
where  his  death  occurred  April  6,  1917,  after  a  brief  ill- 
ness due  to  heart  trouble.  He  was  buried  in  that  town. 
Always  a  great  reader  and  widely  informed,  he  retained 
his  intellectual  vigor  and  lively  interest  in  affairs  until  the 
last. 

Mr.  Buck  was  married  June  3,  1863,  in  Bucksport,  to 
Emeline  Billings,  daughter  of  Henry  and  Eliza  (Cobb) 
Darling.  Mrs.  Buck  died  on  May  17,  1909.  They  had 
one  son,  Carl  Darling,  who  received  the  degrees  of  B.A. 
and  Ph.D.  at  Yale  in  1886  and  1889,  respectively,  and  that 
of  Litt.D.  from  the  University  of  Athens  in  19 12,  and 
who  has  been  for  some  years  a  professor  at  the  University 


1852  263 

of  Chicago.  The  latter's  second  son,  Howard  S.  Buck, 
graduated  from  Yale  in  1916,  and  is  now  serving  with 
the  American  Ambulance  Corps  in  France.  Mr.  Buck 
was  a  cousin  of  Rev.  Edwin  A.  Buck  (B.A.  1849)  ^^d  of 
Rev.  John  R.  Thurston  (B.A.  1851).  The  preceding  sketch 
gives  the  details  of  the  latter's  life. 


Ephraim  Cutter,  B.A.   1852 

Born  September  i,  1832,  in  Woburn,  Mass. 
Died  April  24,  1917,  in  West  Falmouth,  Mass. 

Ephraim  Cutter  was  born  in  Woburn,  Mass.,  September 
I,  1832,  the  son  of  Benjamin  Cutter  (B.A.  Harvard  1824, 
M.A.  and  M.D.  Harvard  1827,  M.D.  Pennsylvania  1857) 
and  Mary  (Whittemore)  Cutter.  His  father  practiced 
medicine  in  Woburn  from  1827  until  his  death  in  1864, 
and  was  highly  respected  as  a  medical  man;  he  collected 
the  data  afterwards  used  as  foundational  in  "The  Cutter 
Family  of  New  England"  and  the  "History  of  Arlington." 
Ephraim  Cutter  was  a  descendant  of  Richard  Cutter,  who 
in  1640  arrived  in  America  with  his  widowed  mother, 
Elizabeth  Cutter,  and  settled  first  in  Cambridge,  Mass., 
and  later  in  West  Cambridge,  now  Arlington;  the  "His- 
tory of  Arlington"  shows  the  intensive  and  extensive  labors 
of  these  colonists  in  agriculture,  town  and  church  govern- 
ment, and  manufacturing;  mill  property  was  in  the  hands 
of  the  Cutters  for  two  hundred  years.  Among  his  ancestors 
who  fought  in  the  Revolution  were  his  great-grandfather, 
Ammi  Cutter,  Samuel  Locke,  a  captain  of  militia  at  Dor- 
chester Heights,  and  Samuel  Whittemore.  The  latter's 
son,  Amos  Whittemore,  who  was  the  grandfather  of  Eph- 
raim Cutter,  in  1797  invented  a  card  machine,  thereby 
establishing  a  prosperous  industry  in  the  town.  The 
Whittemore  family  descended  from  Thomas  Whittemore, 
who  came  from  Hitchin,  England,  in  1642,  settling  in 
Charlestown  and  Maiden,  Mass. 

Ephraim  Cutter  received  his  preparatory  training  at 
Warren  Academy  in  his  native  town.  In  his  Junior  year 
at  Yale  he  was  given  a  Second  Colloquy  appointment. 
While  pursuing  his  work  in  the  College,  he  took  the  full 
course  in  chemistry  in  the  Scientific  School. 

After  teaching  at  Warren  Academy  for  a  year  following 


264  YALE    COLLEGE 

his  graduation  from  Yale,  he  began  the  study  of  medicine, 
taking  courses  at  Harvard  and  the  University  of  Penn- 
sylvania. He  received  his  medical  degree  from  the  former 
institution  in  1856  and  from  the  latter  in  1857.  The  Boyl- 
ston  Gold  Medal  was  awarded  to  him  by  the  authorities 
at  Harvard  in  1857.  He  practiced  his  profession  at 
Woburn  from  1856  to  1875,  at  Cambridge  for  the  next  six 
years,  and  in  New  York  City  from  1881  to  190 1.  His  home 
was  at  West  Falmouth,  Mass.,  during  the  remainder  of 
his  life.  Dr.  Cutter  had  given  much  time  to  research 
throughout  the  entire  period  of  his  professional  career. 
He  studied  the  morphology  of  raw  beef  for  many  years, 
discovered  the  American  tuberculosis  cattle  test,  and,  in 
1 87 1,  proved  that  under  certain  procedures  galvanic  cur- 
rents traverse  deep  tissues  of  the  body.  He  was  an  expert 
in  food  values,  and,  among  others,  was  the  author  of 
"Versions  and  Flexions,"  "Food  in  Motherhood,"  "Fatty 
Ills  and  their  Masquerades,"  and  "Food — Its  Relation  to 
Health  and  Disease,"  the  last  two  being  written  in  collab- 
oration with  his  son,  John  A.  Cutter.  His  published  writ- 
ings included  about  six  hundred  articles,  these  appearing 
in  professional  and  scientific  journals.  Dr.  Cutter  had 
invented  a  number  of  surgical,  laryngological,  and  gyne- 
cological instruments  and  procedures  in  relation  to  them. 
In  1876,  with  George  B.  Harriman,  D.D.S.,  of  Boston,  who 
then  owned  ToUes'  i/75th  inch  objective,  he  used  this 
highest  power  lens,  as  well  as  lower  ones,  in  micro-photog- 
raphy on  blood  and  yeast  protoplasms,  antedating  Metchni- 
koff's  leucocytosis  by  nearly  ten  years ;  it  is  but  just  to 
note  that  Dr.  Harriman  could  not  employ  the  i/75th  inch 
objective  in  blood  work  with  the  special  Tolles  condenser 
until  Dr.  Cutter  had  made  some  adjustments;  the  apparatus 
for  this  micro-photography  was  also  designed  by  him.  He 
was  the  first  to  use  the  term  morphology  in  medicine  in 
relation  to  blood,  sputum,  tirine,  potable  waters,  animal 
and  vegetable  kingdom  foods,  etc.,  and  despite  inventions 
of  procedures  and  instruments  and  his  photography  of  his 
own  larynx  in  1868,  getting  the  anterior  insertion  in  which 
Czermak  had  failed,  he  considered  his  most  important  work 
to  have  been  in  the  last  forty  odd  years  of  his  life  in  the 
management  of  chronic  cases  of  disease  and  the  detection 
of- their  pre-stages  by  morphological  and  chemical  work. 
He  went  to  Europe  in  1862,  1889,  and  1890.     During  his 


1852  265 

first  trip  abroad  he  visited  many  hospitals  and  medical 
schools,  endeavoring  to  make  known  the  medical  virtues 
of  veratrum  viride;  on  his  second  visit  he  represented  the 
American  Medical  Association  at  the  meeting  of  the 
British  Medical  Association  at  Leeds,  and  in  1890  he 
attended  the  Tenth  International  Medical  Congress  at 
Berlin,  speaking  on  several  subjects,  and  was  one  of  the 
four  per  cent  invited  to  the  imperial  reception  at  Potsdam. 
In  1887  Grinnell  College  conferred  the  honorary  degree 
of  LL.D.  upon  him.  He  was  at  one  time  professor  of 
clinical  morphology  and  apphed  physics  at  the  College  of 
Physicians  and  Surgeons,  Boston. 

Dr.  Cutter  was  a  special  military  agent  in  the  state  of 
Massachusetts  during  the  greater  part  of  the  Civil  War, 
serving  also  on  the  Committee  of  One  Hundred  which 
raised  the  Massachusetts  Soldiers'  Fund.  He  had  been 
Secretary  of  the  Class  of  1852  since  the  death  of  Rev. 
Alonzo  N.  Lewis  in  1907,  and  edited  the  Class  Record 
issued  in  1913.  He  was  a  member  of  many  scientific 
organizations,  and  was  deacon  and  clerk  of  the  First  Con- 
gregational Church  in  Woburn  from  1864  to  1874,  and 
compiled  a  manual  of  this  church  with  historical  data 
which  is  of  high  interest  to  bibliophiles  in  American  church 
history;  with  his  first  wife  he  was  largely  instrumental 
in  organizing  the  Church  of  the  Comforter  in  the  Bronx, 
and  was  a  lay  member  of  the  General  Synod  of  the 
Reformed  Church  of  America  in  1898.  He  wrote  much 
on  church  music ;  with  William  Ludden  and  Rev.  Dr. 
Gardiner  vSpring  Plumley,  both  graduates  of  the  College  in 
1850,  he  prepared  papers  on  the  need  of  a  School  of  Music 
at  Yale,  which  were  presented  to  the  Yale  Alumni  Asso- 
ciation of  Fairfield  County,  the  foundation  of  this  depart- 
ment following  within  a  short  time. 

His  death  occurred  April  24,  19 17,  at  his  home  in  West 
Falmouth,  after  a  brief  illness  resulting  from  apoplexy. 
Interment  was  in  the  Kensico  Cemetery,  Westchester 
County,  N.  Y. 

He  was  twice  married,  his  first  wife  being  Rebecca 
Smith,  daughter  of  Thomas  Valentine  Sullivan,  one  of 
the  three  founders  of  the  American  Young  Men's  Chris- 
tian Association,  and  Elizabeth  (Dunning)  Sullivan.  Their 
marriage  took  place  in  Woburn,  October  7,  1856,  and  nine 
children  were  born  to  them:    Benjamin,  who  studied  in 


266  YALE   COLLEGE 

Germany  under  Gotschius  and  Seifriz  for  three  years, 
became  a  musician  and  composer  of  repute  in  this  country, 
and  died  in  1910;  Ephraim,  a  student  at  the  Massachusetts 
Institute  of  Technology  in  1876-77;  Thomas  SuUivan,  who 
died  January  31,  1863;  John  Ashburton  (B.A.  Massachu- 
setts Agricuhural  College  and  Boston  University  1882, 
M.D.  Albany  Medical  College  1886)  ;  Mary  Whittemore, 
who  died  at  the  age  of  nine  years ;  Rebecca  Russell,  whose 
death  occurred  February  i,  1869;  Lewis  Whitney  (died 
June  26,  1874)  ;  Grace  Dunning,  who  died  when  five  years 
old,  and  Edward  Parker,  who  died  in  1898.  Mrs.  Cutter's 
death  occurred  in  1899,  and  two  years  later  Dr.  Cutter  was 
married  in  Boston  to  Mrs.  Anna  L.  Davidson,  daughter  of 
Rev.  Lamson  Minor  and  Nancy  Minor,  and  widow  of  G. 
Minor  Davidson.  She  survives  him  with  two  sons  by  his 
first  marriage,  and  he  also  leaves  a  brother,  William 
Richard  Cutter,  who,  from  1865  to  1867,  was  a  student 
at  Norwich  University,  which  conferred  the  degree  of 
M.A.  upon  him  in  1893,  as  of  1868,  and  who  took  a  special 
course  in  the  Sheffield  Scientific  School  from  1867  to  i86g. 


Wayne  MacVeagh,  B.A.   1853 

Born  April  19,  1833,  in  West  Vincent,  Pa. 
Died  January  11,  1917,  in  Washington,  D.  C. 

[Isaac]  Wayne  MacVeagh  was  born  April  19,  1833,  at 
West  Vincent,  Pa.,  the  son  of  John  and  Margaret  (Lincoln) 
MacVeagh.  His  parents  were  pioneer  settlers  in  Chester 
County,  Pa.  He  joined  the  Class  of  1853  as  a  Junior,  was 
given  a  second  prize  in  English  disputation  that  year  and 
a  Senior  High  Oration  appointment,  was  a  member  of  Phi 
Beta  Kappa,  and  spoke  at  Commencement. 

During  the  first  year  after  his  graduation  from  Yale  he 
taught  at  the  Freeland  Seminary  in  Montgomery  County, 
Pa.  He  then  began  the  study  of  law  in  the  ofifice  of 
Joseph  J.  Lewis  in  Westchester,  Pa.,  and  in  April,  1856, 
was  admitted  to  the  bar.  He  carried  on  a  general  practice 
in  Westchester  for  the  next  fourteen  years,  serving  from 
1854  to  1862  as  district  attorney  of  Chester  County.  He 
received  a  commission  as  captain  of  cavalry  in  the  Penn- 
sylvania  State   Mihtia  in    1862,   the   following  year  being 


1852-1853  267 

assigned  to  an  infantry  regiment.  During  the  emergency 
in  1863  he  acted  as  aide  on  the  staff  of  General  Couch, 
holding  a  commission  as  major  in  the  volunteer  service. 
In  that  same  year  he  served  as  chairman  of  the  Republican 
State  Committee.  Mr.  MacVeagh  was  appointed  minister 
resident  at  Constantinople  by  President  Grant  in  May,  1870, 
but  resigned  that  post  in  September,  1871.  Returning  to 
Harrisburg,  he  was,  in  October,  1872,  elected  a  member  of 
the  Constitutional  Convention  of  Pennsylvania,  and  served 
as  chairman  of  the  committee  on  the  Legislature  and  as  a 
member  of  the  committee  on  the  judiciary.  In  1876  he 
opened  a  law  office  in  Philadelphia.  The  next  year  he 
headed  .the  commission  which  was  sent  to  Louisiana  to 
amicably  adjust  disputes  of  contending  parties  there.  He 
served  as  attorney  general  of  the  United  States  from 
March,  1881,  until  the  death  of  President  Garfield  the  fol- 
lowing November,  after  which  he  resumed  his  practice  in 
Philadelphia.  He  was  appointed  ambassador  to  Italy  in 
1893,  and  served  in  that  capacity  for  four  years.  His 
legal  career  was  a  long  and  distinguished  one,  its  climax 
coming  with  his  appointment  as  chief  counsel  of  the  United 
States  in  the  Venezuela  arbitration  before  The  Hague 
Tribunal  in  1907.  Mr.  MacVeagh  received  the  honorary 
degree  of  Doctor  of  Laws  from  Amherst  in  1881,  from 
Pennsylvania  in  1897,  and  from  Harvard  in  1901.  He 
was  for  some  years  subsequent  to  its  organization  in  1880 
president  of  the  Civil  Service  Reform  Association  of  Phila- 
delphia, and  had  been  chairman  of  the  Indian  Rights 
Association.  He  had  had  a  number  of  articles  published 
in  the  North  American  Reviezv. 

Owing  to  declining  health,  he  had  withdrawn  from  active 
life  some  years  ago,  and  had  since  lived  quietly  in  Wash- 
ington, D.  C,  spending  several  months  each  year  on  his 
farm  at  Bryn  Mawr,  Pa.  His  death  occurred  at  his  Wash- 
ington home,  January  11,  19 17. 

Mr.  MacVeagh  was  twice  married,  his  first  wife  being 
Letty  Miner,  daughter  of  Joseph  J.  Lewis  of  Westchester. 
Their  marriage  took  place  May  22,  1856,  and  two  children 
were  born  to  them :  Lincoln,  who  graduated  from  Amherst 
in  1881,  and  Charles  Miner  (B.A.  Harvard  1881,  LL.B. 
Columbia  1883).  Mrs.  MacVeagh  died  June  22,  1862,  and 
on  December  27,  1866,  Mr.  MacVeagh  was  married  to  Vir- 
ginia Rolette,  daughter  of  Simon  Cameron  of  Harrisburg. 


268  YALE    COLLEGE 

They  had  two  children,  Wayne,  who  died  January  i,  1893, 
while  in  his  Senior  year  at  Harvard,  and  Margaretta 
Cameron.  Mr.  MacVeagh's  brother,  Franklin  MacVeagh 
(B.A.  1862,  LL.B.  Columbia  1864,  LL.D.  Yale  1912),  was 
secretary  of  the  Treasury  under  President  Taft. 


Samuel  Chester  Gale,  B.A.   1854 

Born  September  15,  1827,  in  Royalston,  Mass. 
Died  September  22,  1916,  in  Minneapolis,  Minn. 

Samuel  Chester  Gale,  son  of  Isaac  Gale,  who  seryed  with 
the  Second  Brigade,  Seventh  Division,  Massachusetts 
Volunteers,  during  the  War  of  1812,  and  Tamar  (God- 
dard)  Gale,  was  born  on  his  father's  farm  at  Royalston, 
Mass.,  September  15,  1827.  His  grandfather,  Jonathan 
Gale,  a  descendant  of  Richard  Gale,  who  emigrated  from 
England  to  Watertown,  Mass.,  in  1635,  fought  in  the  Rev- 
olution; his  wife  was  Rhoda  (Baker)  Gale.  Samuel 
Gale's  mother  was  the  daughter  of  Samuel  and  Catharine 
(Parks)  Goddard,  and  through  her  he  was  descended  from 
William  Goddard,  who  came  to  America  from  London  in 
1665,  settling  at  Watertown,  Mass. 

He  prepared  for  college  principally  through  his  own 
efforts,  entering  with  the  Class  of  1854.  He  received  in 
Sophomore  year  a  third  prize  in  English  composition,  was 
given  a  Dispute  appointment  and  an  election  to  Phi  Beta 
Kappa,  and  was  Class  orator  at  Commencement. 

Mr.  Gale  took  up  the  study  of  law  at  Harvard  in  the 
fall  after  receiving  his  bachelor's  degree  at  Yale.  During 
his  course  there  he  taught  for  a  term  at  the  high  school 
in  Holden,  Mass.,  and  in  1855  returned  to  New  Haven 
for  a  year  as  a  member  of  the  teaching  staff  at  General 
Russell's  school.  He  then  read  law  for  a  time  in  the  office 
of  Bacon  &  Aldrich  in  Worcester,  Mass.  In  May,  1857, 
he  removed  to  Minneapolis,  Minn.,  where  the  remainder 
of  his  life  was  spent.  For  a  few  years  he  was  engaged 
in  the  practice  of  law,  being  for  a  while  in  the  office  of 
Cornell  &  Vanderburgh,  but  about  i860  he  entered  the  real 
estate  and  mortgage  loan  business  with  his  brother,  Harlow 
A.  Gale,  and  Mr.  George  H.  Rust  under  the  firm  name  of 
Gale  &  Company.  He  continued  in  the  business  until  the 
infirmities  of  age  compelled  his  retirement  in  19 10. 


1853-1854  269 

Mr.  Gale  was  active  throughout  his  hfe  in  pubHc  matters, 
giving  generously  of  his  time  and  means  to  the  welfare 
of  the  city  and  state.  In  1859  he  aided  in  organizing  a 
library  association  in  Minneapolis,  from  which  grew  the 
Minneapolis  Athenaium  and  later  the  public  library  sys- 
tem, of  which  he  was  for  many  years  one  of  the  directors. 
He  was  early  identified  with  the  Minnesota  Academy  of 
Sciences,  was  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Minneapolis 
Society  of  Fine  Arts,  one  of  the  original  incorporators  of 
Lakewood  Cemetery,  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Education 
from  1871  to  1880  and  of  the  Minnesota  State  Normal 
School  Board,  an  alderman  for  several  years,  being  also 
president  of  the  City  Council,  chairman  of  the  building 
committee  of  the  Minneapolis  Exposition  and  later  its 
president,  and  president  of  the  Board  of  Trade  in  1885. 
Mr.  Gale  was  active  in  the  movement  which  led  to  the 
creation  of  a  park  board  and  a  park  system  in  Minneapolis. 
In  1887  he  gave  a  parsonage  and  grounds  to  the  Baptist 
Church  in  his  native  town,  and  two  years  later,  with  his 
wife,  presented  to  the  town  of  Holden,  Mass.,  the  Damon 
Memorial  Library  and  High  School.  He  was  the  chief 
contributor  toward  the  erection  of  the  Unitarian  Church  of 
Minneapolis,  of  which  he  was  a  member.  In  t888,  in 
conjunction  with  Judge  Charles  E.  Vanderburgh  (B.A. 
1852),  he  gave  the  site  of  the  present  North  Side  Branch 
Library  in  Minneapolis. 

His  death  occurred  September  22,  1916,  at  his  home  in 
Minneapolis,  after  an  illness  of  several  weeks  resulting 
from  a  fall  in  which  his  hip  was  fractured.  He  was  buried 
in  Lakewood  Cemetery. 

On  October  15,  1861,  he  was  married  in  Holden,  Mass., 
to  Susan  Abigail,  daughter  of  Samuel  and  Alona  (Chenery) 
Damon,  who  died  in  February,  1908.  They  had  five  chil- 
dren: Edward  Chenery  (B.A.  Yale  1884,  M.A.  Harvard 
1887)  ;  Alice,  a  graduate  of  Smith  College  in  1887,  who 
was  married  in  1891  to  David  Percy  Jones  (B.A.  Min- 
nesota 1883)  of  Minneapohs;  Anna  (B.L.  Smith  1889), 
the  wife  of  Clarkson  Lindley  of  Minneapolis,  who  is  a  non- 
graduate  member  of  the  Amherst  Class  of  1878;  Marion, 
who  received  the  degree  of  B.L.  from  Smith  in  1894,  and 
Charles  Sumner  (B.A.  1895).  Mr.  Gale's  nephews,  Harlow 
Gale,  and  Samuel  E.,  Maurice  S.,  and  Henry  F.  Damon, 
graduated  from  the  College  in  1885,  1896,  1904,  and  1906, 
respec^^ively. 


270  YALE    COLLEGE 


Alexander  Henry  Stevens,  B.A.   1854 

Born  June  13,  1834,  in  New  York  City 
Died  July  10,  1916,  in  Lawrence,  N.  Y. 

Alexander  Henry  Stevens  was  born  in  New  York  City, 
June  13,  1834,  the  son  of  Byam  Kerby  Stevens  (BA.  1811), 
whose  parents  were  Gen.  Ebenezer  Stevens  and  Lucretia 
(Ledyard)  Stevens.  Ebenezer  Stevens  was  one  of  the 
Boston  Tea  Party,  served  as  senior  officer  of  artillery  at  the 
battle  of  Saratoga  and  as  chief  of  artillery  for  Lafayette 
at  the  battle  of  Yorktown,  and  was  major  general  of  artil- 
lery in  the  War  of  1812 ;  his  wife  was  the  daughter  of  John 
and  Mary  (Ellery  nee  Austin)  Ledyard  of  Hartford,  Conn. 
Alexander  H.  Stevens'  mother  was  Frances,  daughter  of 
Albert  Gallatin,  who  in  1780  came  from  Geneva,  Switzer- 
land, to  the  United  States,  where  he  became  known  as 
one  of  the  greatest  financiers  of  his  day.  He  served  as  a 
Congressman  from  1795  to  1801,  was  secretary  of  the 
Treasury  for  the  next  twelve  years,  played  a  prominent 
part  in  the  negotiation  of  the  treaty  of  Ghent  in  1814,  and 
afterwards  served  successively  as  minister  to  France  and 
England.  He  was  twice  married,  his  first  wife  being 
Sophie  Allegre,  and  his  second,  the  mother  of  Frances 
(Gallatin)  Stevens,  being  Hannah,  daughter  of  Commo- 
dore James  Nicholson,  U.  S.  N.,  and  Frances  (Witter) 
Nicholson.  On  the  paternal  side,  Alexander  H.  Stevens 
was  descended  from  Thomas  Hawley  and  Thomas  Weld  of 
Roxbury,  Mass.,  Thomas  Stanley  of  Cambridge,  Mass., 
and  John  Ledyard  of  Hartford.  His  maternal  ancestors 
included  John  Chew  and  Edward  Robbins  of  Virginia  and 
William  Nicholson  of  Maryland. 

He  was  prepared  for  Yale  at  Huddard's  School  in  New 
York  City,  entering  college  in  1850  and  receiving  his  degree 
four  years  later.  For  about  a  year,  beginning  in  January, 
1855,  he  served  as  a  cashier's  clerk  in  the  Bank  of  Com- 
merce in  New  York  City,  under  his  uncle,  John  A.  Stevens, 
who  was  its  president.  In  May,  1856,  after  two  months 
spent  in  travel  in  Cuba,  he  became  a  clerk  in  the  store  owned 
by  his  brother,  Albert  G.  Stevens,  in  New  York  City.  His 
brother  took  him  into  partnership  with  him  early  in  the  next 
vear,  and,  until  186R,  they  carried  on  a  general  commission 
business  with  Cuba,  principally  in  sugar,  under  the  name 


I 


I854-I855  271 

of  Stevens,  Angulo  &  Company.  In  July  of  the  latter  year 
he  was  made  cashier  of  the  Gallatin  National  Bank  of  New 
York,  continuing  in  that  position  until  April,  1880,  when  he 
was  chosen  to  fill  the  office  of  vice-president.  He  was 
elected  president  of  the  Sixth  National  Bank  in  1890,  and 
nine  years  afterwards,  on  its  consolidation  with  the  Astor 
National  Bank  (later  the  Astor  Trust  Company),  he  was 
made  vice-president,  an  office  which  he  held  until  his  death. 
He  was  also  president  of  the  Samuel  Stevens  Realty  Com- 
pany and  a  director  in  the  Mobile  &  Ohio  Railroad  and  in 
the  St.  Paul  &  Duluth  Railroad.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
Sons  of  the  Revolution.  He  served  as  treasurer  of  the 
fund  raised  in  memory  of  President  Woolsey. 

His  death  occurred,  from  heart  failure,  July  10,  1916,  at 
his  home  at  Lawrence,  Long  Island,  N.  Y.,  where  he  had 
lived  since  1874.  He  was  buried  in  Greenwood  Cemetery, 
Brooklyn. 

Mr.  Stevens  was  married  in  Hartford,  Conn.,  December 
4,  i860,  to  Mary  AUyne,  daughter  of  William  Foster  Otis 
(B.A.  Harvard  1821)  and  Emily  (Marshall)  Otis,  who 
survives.  Eight  children  were  born  to  them :  Mary  Otis ; 
Frances  Gallatin,  who  was  married  in  1893  to  Capt.  Har- 
ington  Swann  of  the  British  Army  and  who  died  Decem- 
ber 24,  1910;  Emily  Louise,  the  widow  of  Adolf  Ladenburg; 
William  Alexander  (died  September  16,  1869)  ;  EUzabeth 
Gray,  whose  death  occurred  October  30,  1893;  Eben,  a 
graduate  of  the  College  in  1892;  Alexander  Eliot,  who 
died  in  June,  1883;  and  Francis  Kerby  (Ph.B.  1897). 
His  Yale  relatives  include  his  uncles,  Samuel  Stevens 
(B.A.  1805),  Alexander  H.  Stevens  (B.A.  1807,  M.D. 
University  of  Pennsylvania  181 1),  and  John  A.  Stevens 
(B.A.  1813)  ;  his  brother,  Frederic  William  Stevens  (B.A. 
1858,  LL.B.  Columbia  1864)  ;  his  cousin,  Ledyard  Stevens 
(B.A.  1864),  and  his  grandson,  Byam  Kerby  Stevens,  a 
member  of  the  Class  of  1919. 


Samuel  Lathrop  Bronson,  B.A.   1855 

Born  January  12,  1834,  in  Waterbury,  Conn. 
Died  June  11,  1917,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 

Samuel   Lathrop  Bronson  was  born  January   12,    1834, 
in  Waterbury,  Conn.,  the  son  of  Henry  Bronson   (M.D. 


272  YALE    COLLEGE 

1827,  Honorary  M.A.  1840),  for  seventeen  years  professor 
of  materia  niedica  and  therapeutics  at  Yale,  and  a  writer 
on  historical  and  economic  subjects.  The  latter  was  the 
son  of  Bennet  Bronson,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1797, 
who  was  at  one  time  chief  justice  of  the  New  Haven 
County  Court,  and  Anne  (Smith)  Bronson;  a  brother  of 
Jesse  Bronson  (B.A.  1826,  M.D.  1829)  and  Thomas  Bron- 
son (B.A.  1829),  and  a  descendant  of  John  Bronson,  who 
came  to  this  country  from  England  in  1636  and  settled  at 
Hartford,  Conn.  Henry  Bronson  married  Sarah  Miles, 
fourth  daughter  of  Samuel  Lathrop  (B.A.  1792),  a  member 
of  the  Massachusetts  State  Senate  for  several  terms  and  a 
Congressman  from  1819  to  1872,  and  Mary  (McCrackan) 
Lathrop,  and  granddaughter  of  Rev.  Joseph  Lathrop,  one 
of  the  most  eminent  preachers  of  his  day  in  New  England, 
who  graduated  from  the  College  in  1754  and  received  an 
honorary  D.D.  at  Yale  in  1791  and  at  Harvard  in  181 1. 
The  founder  of  the  American  branch  of  the  Lathrop 
family  was  Rev.  John  Lathrop,  who  emigrated  from  Eng- 
land to  Scituate,  Mass.,  in  1634. 

Samuel  L.  Bronson  entered  Yale  from  General  Russell's 
Commercial  and  Collegiate  Institute,  New  Haven,  In 
Freshman  year  he  was  given  a  third  prize  in  mathematics. 
His  Junior  appointment  was  a  Dissertation. 

He  was  a  student  in  the  Yale  School  of  Law  from  Sep- 
tember, 1855,  to  March,  1857,  completing  his  preparation 
for  the  law  in  the  office  of  William  B.  Wooster  (LL.B. 
1846)  in  Derby,  Conn.  For  three  years  after  his  admission 
to  the  Connecticut  Bar  in  September,  1857,  he  practiced  in 
Seymour,  in  1858  being  elected  to  the  State  Legislature  on 
the  Democratic  ticket.  His  home  had  be'en  in  New  Haven 
since  June,  1864.  For  some  years  he  was  associated  in 
practice  with  Tilton  E.  Doolittle  (B.A.  Trinity  1844,  LL.B. 
Yale  1846).  He  served  as  recorder  of  the  New  Llaven  City 
Court  from  1866  to  1869,  as  judge  of  the  Court  of  Com- 
mon Pleas  during  1870-71,  and  as  corporation  counsel  far 
the  city  from  1873  to  1878.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
Connecticut  House  of  Representatives  in  1869,   1876,  and 

1877.  He  retired   from  the  practice  of  his  profession  in 

1878,  and  managed  his  father's  large  interests  until  the 
latter's  death  in  1873,  when  he  succeeded  to  the  family 
estates.  In  1900  he  was  the  Democratic  nominee  for 
governor  of  Connecticut.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Pres- 
byterian Church  of  Waterbury. 


1^55  273 

His  death,  which  was  due  to  a  sudden  attack  of  heart 
failure,  occurred  at  his  home  in  New  Haven,  June  ii,  1917. 
Burial  was  in  the  Grove  Street  Cemetery. 

Judge  Bronson  was  married  November  30,  1861,  in  Sey- 
mour, to  Frances  E.,  daughter  of  Thomas  Stoddard  (M.D. 
1836)  and  Esther  Ann  (Gilbert)  Stoddard,  and  grand- 
daughter of  Abiram  Stoddard  (B.A.  1800).  They  had 
six  children:  Thomas  Stoddard  (Ph.B.  1886,  M.D.  1889)  ; 
Josiah  Harmar;  Mary  Esther,  who  died  September  22, 
1895  J  Sarah  Frances ;  Ezekiel  Stoddard,  a  graduate  of 
the  College  in  1900,  and  Marion  DeForest.  Mr.  Bronson 
leaves  his  wife  and  five  children.  He  was  a  brother  of 
Nathan  Smith  Bronson  (Ph.B.  1856)  and  Stephen  Henry 
Bronson  (M.D.  1866),  an  uncle  of  Theodore  L.  Bronson 
(B.A.  1912),  a  cousin  of  Edward  B.  Bronson  (B.A.  1865), 
and  a  second  cousin  of  Bennet  Bronson  (B.A.  1909).  His 
wi.fe's  nephew,  Louis  E.  Stoddard,  graduated  from  the 
College  in  1899. 


Lewis  Elliot  Stanton,  B.A.   1855 

Born  July  19,  1833,  in  Clinton,  Conn. 
Died  August  27,  1916,  in  Clinton,  Conn. 

Lewis  Elliot  Stanton  was  the  son  of  John  Stanton,  a  mer- 
chant, and  Caroline  (Elliot)  Stanton,  and  was  born  in 
Clinton,  Conn.,  July  19,  1833.  His  father,  whose  parents 
were  Adam  Stanton,  a  native  of  Rhode  Island,  and  Eliza- 
beth (Treat)  Stanton,  was  descended  from  Thomas  Stan- 
ton, one  of  the  founders  of  Hartford,  Conn.,  and  a  noted 
Indian  interpreter,  and  from  Abraham  Pierson,  the  first 
president  of  Yale  College.  Through  his  mother,  he  traced 
his  descent  to  Rev.  John  Eliot,  the  "Apostle  to  the  Indians." 

He  entered  college  from  Bacon  Academy  at  Colchester, 
Conn.,  in  Freshman  year  receiving  a  prize  in  one  of  the 
Linonian  debates,  and  the  next  year  being  given  a  third 
prize  in  declamation. 

Mr.  Stanton  taught  for  a  year  after  his  graduation,  at 
first  at  Collamer,  Ohio,  where  he  was  principal  of  Shaw 
Academy,  and  afterwards  in  Cleveland.  He  then  began 
the  study  of  law  at  home,  but  in  May,  1857,  entered  the 
Yale    School    of    Law,    where    he    was    registered    until 


2  74  YALE    COLLEGE 

February,  1859.  At  that  time  he  became  a  clerk  in  the 
law  office  of  John  S.  Beach  (B.A.  1839),  where  he  remained 
until  his  admission  to  the  bar  a  few  months  later.  From 
November,  1859,  until  1865  he  practiced  in  Norwich,  Conn., 
serving  successively  during  this  period  as  assistant  clerk 
of  the  Superior  Court  of  New  London  County  and  as 
recorder  of  the  city  of  Norwich.  Removing  to  Hartford 
in  1865,  he  formed  a  partnership  with  John  C.  Day  (B.A. 
1857)  which  continued  until  187 1 ;  after  that  date  Mr. 
Stanton  had  his  office  alone,  giving  his  attention  largely 
to  corporation  practice,  in  which  he  was  very  successful. 
He  was  assistant  United  States  district  attorney  from  1870 
to  1884,  and  United  States  district  attorney  for  the  next 
four  years.  In  November,  1879,  he  was  elected  to  the 
General  Assembly  from  Hartford,  on  the  Republican  ticket, 
and  during  his  term  of  office  served  as  chairman  of  the 
House  judiciary  committee.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
American  and  Connecticut  Bar  associations,  and  had 
served  as  president  of  the  Hartford  Bar  Library  Asso- 
ciation, to  which  he  bequeathed  his  law  library.  He  was  a 
member  of  the  Connecticut  Historical  Society,  and  had  read 
a  number  of  papers  before  that  body,  two  of  which,  "Recol- 
lections of  Laws  and  Lawyers"  and  "Turnpike  Roads  in 
Connecticut,"  were  afterwards  published.  Some  years  ago 
he  compiled  and  published  an  account  of  the  exercises  at 
the  dedication  of  the  Morgan  School  building  at  Clinton. 
He  had  frequently  delivered  lectures  on  literary  and  his- 
torical subjects.  He  belonged  to  Center  Congregational 
Church,  Hartford. 

Mr.  Stanton  was  in  the  habit  of  spending  much  of  his 
leisure  time  at  the  family  home  in  Clinton,  and  he  died 
there,  of  diabetes,  August  27,  1916,  after  an  illness  of 
several  months,  and  was  buried  in  the  local  cemetery.  The 
residence  of  the  first  president  of  Yale  stood  on  the  site 
of  the  Stanton  home  and  some  of  the  timbers  of  the  ancient 
home  are  built  into  the  present  structure,  which  contains 
a  valuable  collection  of  antique  furniture,  pottery,  and  por- 
celain. By  the  provision  of  his  will,  Mr.  Stanton  estab- 
lished this  historic  house  as  a  museum,  and  created  a  fund 
for  its  endowment.  He  was  unmarried,  and  left  no  imme- 
diate relatives.  He  was  a  first  cousin  of  Rev.  Dr.  Giles 
Buckingham  Willcox  (B.A.  1848)  and  a  second  cousin  of 
David  Willcox  (B.A.  1872),  Rev.  Charles  H.  Willcox,  a 


1855-1856  275 

graduate  of  the  College  in  1876  and  of  the  School  of 
Religion  in  1881,  and  of  Alfred  B.  Willcox,  who  received 
his  Ph.B.  at  Yale  in  1882. 


Alexis  Wynns  Harriott,  B.A.   1856 

Born  September  24,  1835,  at  Salt  Cay,  Turks  Islands, 

British  West  Indies 
Died  December  7,  1916,  at  Salt  Cay,  Turks  Islands, 

British  West  Indies 

Alexis  Wynns  Harriott,  one  of  the  three  children  of 
Daniel  and  Mary  Olivia  (Hyatt)  Harriott,  was  born  Sep- 
tember 24,  1835,  at  Salt  Cay  on  Grand  Turk,  one  of  the 
group  known  as  Turks  Islands,  in  the  British  West  Indies. 
His  father  was  born  in  the  Bermudas,  and  went  to  the  Turks 
Islands  when  a  young  man,  there  engaging  in  business  as 
a  manufacturer  and  merchant;  he  had  served  as  a  justice 
of  the  peace,  as  an  honorable  member  of  the  Legislative 
Council,  and  as  a  major  in  the  militia.  His  mother  was 
a  native  of  Grand  Turk. 

He  received  his  preparatory  training  at  the  Simeon  Hart 
School  in  Farmington,  Conn.  After  graduating  from  the 
College  he  studied  engineering  for  a  year  in  the  Scientific 
School,  and  then  spent  a  year  at  home,  returning  to  Yale 
in  the  fall  of  1858.  He  received  the  degree  of  Ph.B.  the 
following  June,  While  an  undergraduate  in  the  College 
he  served  as  captain  of  the  Thulia  Boat  Club,  and,  in  his 
Senior  year,  as  commodore  of  the  Yale  Navy.  He  was 
captain  of  the  Olympia  Boat  Club  during  the  two  years 
of  his  course  in  the  Scientific  School. 

Mr.  Harriott  taught  English  and  mathematics  in  New 
York  City  for  three  months  in  1859,  but  returned  to  the 
West  Indies  in  February,  i860,  to  carry  on  the  salt  manu- 
facturing business  founded  in  1833  by  his  father,  who  had 
died  the  previous  December.  In  April,  1863,  he  received 
the  appointment  of  United  States  consular  agent  at  Salt 
Cay,  and  served  in  that  capacity  until  1888.  At  that  time 
he  put  his  business  in  the  hands  of  his  two  younger  sons, 
and  entered  the  British  Colonial  Civil  Service,  as  assistant 
commissioner  at  Grand  Turk.  He  later  became  acting 
commissioner,  and  for  many  years  was  the  virtual  governor 
of  the  island.    Mr.  Harriott  served  as  a  justice  of  the  peace 


276  YALE    COLLEGE 

for  Turks  and  Caicos  Islands  for  many  years,  beginning 
in  1879;  as  marriage  officer  at  Salt  Cay  from  1884  to  1888, 
and  as  a  member  of  the  Legislative  Board  of  Turks  and 
Caicos  Islands  from  1881  to  1888.  He  was  a  member  of 
the  Episcopal  Church,  and  had  at  different  times  been  a 
vestryman,  church  warden,  and  lay  reader.  He  had  made 
frequent  visits  to  Bermuda  and  to  the  United  States. 

He  died  December  7,  19 16,  at  his  home  on  Grand  Turk. 
His  health  had  failed  rapidly  since  the  death  of  his  wife 
in  November,  1915. 

His  marriage  took  place  November  17,  1864,  ^^  Farm- 
ington.  Conn.,  to  Alice  Celestia,  daughter  of  Francis  Win- 
throp  Cowles.  Four  of  their  children,  Edmund  Cowles, 
Daniel  Francis,  Howard  Fessenden,  and  Mary  Louise,  are 
living.  A  son,  Francis  Cowles,  born  in  1872,  died  Decem- 
ber 16,  1880.  Mr.  Harriott's  brother,  James  Hyatt  Harriott, 
received  the  degree  of  M.D.  from  Yale  in  1859. 


William  James  Harris,  B.A.   1856 

Born  May  21,  1834,  in  West  Brattleboro,  Vt. 
Died  June  22,  1917,  in  Nashua,  N.  H. 

William  James  Harris  was  born  in  West  Brattleboro,  Vt., 
May  21,  1834,  the  son  of  Rev.  Roswell  Harris,  a  graduate 
of  Middlebury  College  in  182 1  and  of  Andover  Theo- 
logical Seminary  in  1826,  and  Matilda  (Leavitt)  Harris. 
His  father,  who  was  for  many  years  engaged  in  educa- 
tional work,  was  the  son  of  William  and  Abiah  (Brooks) 
Harris. 

Before  entering  Yale  as  a  Junior,  he  was  for  a  time  a 
member  of  the  Williams  Class  of  1856.  He  received  a 
second  prize  in  Latin  in  Junior  year  at  Yale,  and  a  Senior 
High  Oration  appointment,  and  was  elected  to  membership 
in  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 

He  spent  the  first  three  years  after  his  graduation  as 
principal  of  an  academy  at  St.  Stephen,  New  Brunswick, 
and  from  1859  to  1861  was  head  of  the  Monson  (Mass.) 
Academy.  He  became  pastor  of  the  Congregational  Church 
at  Saxtons  River,  Vt.,  in  June,  1861,  leaving  there  a  year 
later  to  accept  a  call  to  the  Congregational  Church  at 
Brandon,  Vt.,  where  he  remained  until  December,  1864. 
He  then  studied  for  over  a  year  for  orders  in  the  Protestant 


1856  277 

Episcopal  Church,  Hving  in  Boston  and  its  vicinity  and  at 
Philadelphia,  and  in  June,  1866,  became  rector  of  Grace 
Church,  Manchester,  N.  H.  During  the  academic  year  of 
1868-69  he  served  as  an  instructor  in  the  Episcopal  Theo- 
logical School  at  Cambridge,  Mass.  From  January,  1871, 
to  July,  1876,  he  was  rector  of  Trinity  Church,  Rutland, 
Vt.  His  next  parish  was  that  of  Christ  Church,  Detroit, 
Mich.,  which  he  left  in  1881.  After  being  engaged  in 
ministerial  work  in  Chicago,  111.,  for  some  months,  he 
became,  in  1882,  rector  of  Christ  Church,  Yankton,  S.  Dak., 
and  he  was  subsequently  dean  of  Calvary  Cathedral  at 
Sioux  Falls,  that  state.  In  1885  he  returned  East,  and  was 
for  a  time  in  charge  of  St.  Paul's  Church,  Boston,  later 
being  rector  of  the  Church  of  the  Ascension,  Waltham, 
Mass.,  and  Christ  Church,  Hyde  Park,  Mass.  On  January 
I,  1892,  he  became  archdeacon,  or  as  it  is  known  locally, 
diocesan  missionary,  of  the  Diocese  of  Vermont,  making 
his  headquarters  in  Rutland,  although  his  home  was  in 
Nashua,  N.  H.  He  served  in  that  capacity  for  a  number 
of  years,  and  previous  to  his  retirement  in  1907  was  in 
charge  of  the  Church  of  the  Good  Shepherd,  Barre,  Vt., 
and  of  St.  Paul's  Church,  White  River  Junction,  Vt.  His 
death  occurred  June  22,  1917,  at  his  home  in  Nashua. 

He  received  the  degree  of  D.D.  from  Trinity  College, 
Hartford,  in  1872.  From  1894  to  1907  he  published  The 
Mountain  Echo  as  a  diocesan  paper  in  Vermont.  He  was 
a  deputy  to  the  Triennial  Convention  of  the  Protestant 
Episcopal  Church  from  the  Diocese  of  Michigan  in  1880 
and  1883  and  from  the  Diocese  of  Vermont  in  1901.  He 
served  as  a  member  of  the  standing  committee  of  the 
Diocese  of  Michigan  from  1876  to  1879,  and  was  president 
of  two  diocesan  conventions  when  the  diocese  was  without 
a  bishop. 

Dr.  Harris  was  married  August  18,  1859,  to  Mary  Gale 
Hill  of  St.  Stephen,  New  Brunswick.  They  had  two 
children :  Emma,  who  was  married  February  18,  1896, 
to  William  M.  Hall  of  Montreal,  Quebec,  and  William 
Leavitt  (B.A.  Dartmouth  1896,  LL.B.  Boston  University 
1898),  who  died  June  4,  1908.  His  brothers,  Roswell  and 
Charles  Clarke  Harris,  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  from 
Middlebury  in  i860  and  1862,  respectively.  The  former 
was  also  a  graduate  of  Andover  Theological  Seminary  and 
the  latter  of  the  Divinity  School  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal 
Church  in  Philadelphia. 


278  YALE    COLLEGE 


Whittlesey  Adams,  B.A.   1857 

Born  November  26,  1829,  in  Warren,  Ohio 
Died  June  27,  1916,  in  Warren,  Ohio 

Whittlesey  Adams,  one  of  the  ten  children  of  Ashael 
Adams,  a  merchant,  and  Lucy  (Mygatt)  Adams,  was  born 
in  Warren,  Ohio,  November  2.6,  1829.  Both  parents  came 
originally  from  Connecticut.  His  father  was  the  son  of 
Ashael  and  Olive  (Avery)  Adams,  and  was  descended  from 
John  Adams,  who  emigrated  to  America  from  England  in 
1621,  settling  in  Plymouth  Colony.  Through  his  mother, 
whose  parents  were  Comfort  and  Lucy  (Knapp)  Mygatt, 
he  traced  his  descent  to  Joseph  Mygatt,  one  of  the  first 
settlers  of  Hartford,  Conn.  His  grandfather,  Ashael 
Adams,  was  a  soldier  of  the  Revolution,  enlisting  as  a 
private,  Connecticut  line,  in  1777,  and  serving  until  the 
close  of  the  war;  he  was  with  Washington  during  the 
winter  at  Valley  Forge.  His  great-grandfather.  Col.  Eli 
Mygatt,  served  with  distinction  in  various  Connecticut 
regiments  during  that  war.  Other  ancestors  were  John 
Webster,  an  early  governor  of  Connecticut,  and  Gov.  Wil- 
liam Bradford  of  Plymouth. 

His  preparatory  training  was  received  in  the  public 
schools  in  his  native  town.  In  1853  he  entered  Western 
Reserve  University,  where  he  spent  the  next  three  years, 
joining  the  Class  of  1857  at  Yale  as  a  Senior. 

Mr.  Adams  began  the  study  of  law  in  Warren  soon 
after  receiving  his  degree  from  Yale,  but,  although  admitted 
to  the  bar  in  i860,  he  had  never  followed  that  profession. 
In  1857,  on  securing  the  agency  of  several  insurance  com- 
panies, he  established  the  Adams  Insurance  Agency  in 
Warren.  His  business  had  grown  rapidly,  and  at  the  time 
of  his  death  he  was  the  president  of  The  Adams  Insurance 
Agency  Company,  then  the  oldest  and  largest  insurance 
agency  in  eastern  Ohio.  Mr.  Adams  had  large  financial 
interests  in  the  leading  industrial  and  banking  institutions 
in  Warren.  From  October,  1858,  until  January,  i860,  he 
held  an  appointment  as  deputy  clerk  of  the  Probate  Court 
of  Trumbull  County,  Ohio,  and  he  had  also  served  at 
various  times  as  county  school  examiner,  deputy  county 
auditor,  and  as  deputy  postmaster  of  Warren.  In  1859-60 
he  was  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Warren  &  Lake  Erie 


i857  279 

Plank  Road  Company,  and  from  1865  to  1869  he  was  a 
member  of  the  drygoods  firm  of  McCombs,  Smith  & 
Adams.  He  had  written  somewhat  for  the  newspapers, 
principally  on  subjects  connected  with  local  history.  He 
held  for  several  years  the  honor  of  being  the  oldest  living 
member  of  the  First  Presbyterian  Church  of  Warren,  of 
which,  in  1858-59,  he  was  the  treasurer.  He  was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Sons  of  the  American  Revolution  and  the  Society 
of  Colonial  Wars.  In  1864  he  was  offered  a  commission 
as  additional  paymaster,  with  the  rank  of  major,  in  the 
United  States  Volunteers,  but  declined  the  offer. 

Mr.  Adams  died  June  27,  1916,  at  his  home  in  Warren, 
after  an  illness  of  a  few  days  resulting  from  infirmities 
incident  to  his  age.  Burial  was  in  Oakwood  Cemetery  in 
that  town. 

Plis  marriage  took  place  in  Warren,  May  19,  1864,  to 
Margaret  Scott,  daughter  of  Charles  and  Ann  Eliza  (Scott) 
Smith.  Her  death  occurred  March  15,  1915.  They  had 
three  sons:  Charles  Smith,  who  died  November  8,  191 5, 
Fred  W.,  and  Scott  M. 


Edward  Louis  Duer,  B.A.  1857 

Born  January  19,  1836,  in  Crosswicks,  N.  J. 
Died  September  6,  1916,  in  Odessa,  Del. 

Edward  Louis  Duer  was  born  in  Crosswicks,  N.  J., 
January  19,  1836,  the  son  of  Dr.  George  Duer.  He  entered 
Yale  in  1854  to  take  up  the  study  of  engineering  subjects, 
and  in  1855  joined  the  College  Class  of  1857,  with  which 
he  was  graduated. 

From  1857  until  i860  he  pursued  the  study  of  medicine 
at  the  University  of  Pennsylvania,  receiving  the  degree 
of  M.D.  in  the  latter  year.  He  served  as  resident  physician 
at  the  Philadelphia  Hospital  until  1862,  when  he  opened 
offices  in  Philadelphia.  He  continued  in  practice  there 
until  191 1,  attaining  great  success  as  a  specialist  in  gynecol- 
ogy. Since  his  retirement  he  had  lived  at  Odessa,  Del., 
where  he  died  September  6,  19 16. 

From  1863  to  1881  Dr.  Duer  served  as  obstetrician  and 
gynecologist  to  the  Philadelphia  Hospital,  and  he  had  also 
been  on  the  staffs  of  the  Preston  Retreat,  the  Presbyterian 


28o 


YALE    COLLEGE 


and  Maternity  hospitals,  the  Philadelphia  Home  for  Incur- 
ables,^  and  the  Pennsylvania  State  Hospital  for  Women, 
of  which  latter  institution  he  was  one  of  the  founders. 
He  aided  in  founding  the  Philadelphia  Polyclinic,  and  for 
some  time  lectured  there  on  gynecology.  During  the  Civil 
War  he  held  an  appointment  as  an  acting  assistant  surgeon 
in  the  United  States  Army,  serving  as  chief  operator  for  a 
staff  of  seventeen  surgeons.  Dr.  Duer  had  been  chairman 
of  the  medical  section  of  the  Central  Committee  of  the 
University  of  Pennsylvania,  and  had  frequently  contributed 
to  medical  publications,  including  the  English  Obstetrical 
Journal  and  the  American  Obstetrical  Journal.  He  was  a 
member  of  a  number  of  professional  societies,  serving  at 
various  times  as  president  of  the  Philadelphia  Obstetrical 
Society  and  the  Society  of  Ex-Resident  Physicians  of  the 
Philadelphia  Hospital,  and  as  vice-president  of  the  Ameri- 
can Gynecological  Society.  He  was  a  former  president  of 
the  Yale  Alumni  Association  of  Philadelphia,  and  had 
served  as  vice-president,  and  later  as  president,  of  the  New 
Jersey  Society  of  Pennsylvania. 

He  was  married  October  29,  1862,  to  Clara  J.  Naudain 
of  Philadelphia.  Their  two  children  survive :  Snow  Nau- 
dain, who  received  the  degrees  of  B.A.  and  M.D.  from  the 
University  of  Pennsylvania  in  1885  and  1890,  respectively, 
and  Helen,  the  wife  of  Malcolm  S.  Councill  of  Bryn  Mawr, 
Pa.  Mrs.  Duer  died  May  15,  1880,  and  in  1907  Dr.  Duer 
married  Louise,  daughter  of  Daniel  W.  Corbit  of  Odessa, 
Del.,  who  survives  him. 


Alfred  Hand,  B.A.   1857 

Born  March  26,  1835,  in  Honesdale,  Pa. 
Died  May  2;^,  1917,  in  Scranton,  Pa. 

Alfred  Hand  was  born  March  26,  1835,  in  Honesdale, 
Pa.,  the  son  of  Ezra  Hand,  a  merchant,  and  Catharine 
(Chapman)  Hand.  His  father  was  the  son  of  John  and 
Mary  (Jones)  Hand,  and  a  descendant  of  John  Hand,  who 
came  from  Stanstede,  England  to  Southampton,  Long 
Island,  in  1640  and  afterwards  became  one  of  the  founders 
of  Easthampton.  His  mother's  parents  were  Benjamin  and 
Lydia  Cochrane  (Jones)  Chapman.    She  traced  her  descent 


i857  281 

to  Robert  Chapman,  who  came  from  Hull,  England,  in  1635, 
with  the  company  sent  out  by  those  interested  in  the  Con- 
necticut Patent  to  erect  a  fort  at  the  mouth  of  the  Con- 
necticut River.  He  later  helped  to  found  the  town  of 
Saybrook,  serving  for  many  years  as  one  of  its  commis- 
sioners and  as  deputy  to  the  Connecticut  General  Court. 
He  was  also  a  captain  of  the  Train  Band,  and  received 
large  devises  of  land  in  Connecticut  from  friendly 
Indian  chieftains. 

Alfred  Hand  received  his  early  education  in  the  schools 
at  Honesdale,  where  he  prepared  for  college  under  New 
England  tutors.  At  Yale  he  was  given  Dissertation  appoint- 
ments, and  was  a  member  of  Linonia  and  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 

Soon  after  graduation  Mr.  Hand  entered  the  law  office 
of  William  Jessup  (B.A.  181 5)  and  William  H.  Jessup 
(B.A.  1849)  i"  Montrose,  Pa.  He  was  admitted  to  the 
bar  of  Susquehanna  County  in  1859,  and  in  May  of  the 
next  year  began  practice  in  Scranton  as  a  member  of  the 
firm  of  Jessup  &  Hand.  He  had  also  served  as  principal 
of  the  Susquehanna  Academy  at  Montrose  during  1858-59. 
In  1866  he  formed  a  co-partnership  with  Isaac  J.  Post,  a 
graduate  of  the  College  in  i860,  which  continued  until 
1879,  when  he  was  appointed  an  additional  judge  of  the 
Eleventh  Judicial  District  of  Pennsylvania.  He  was 
assigned  to  the  Forty-fifth  District  when  it  was  formed 
in  1879  and  elected  judge  for  a  term  of  ten  years  from 
January  i,  1880.  In  July,  1888,  he  received  an  appoint- 
ment as  a  justice  of  the  Supreme  Court  of  the  state  to 
fill  an  unexpired  term,  and  served  until  January,  1889, 
when  he  resumed  the  practice  of  law.  The  next  year  he 
formed  a  partnership  with  his  son,  William  (B.A.  1887), 
continuing  in  that  connection  until  his  gradual  retirement 
a  few  years  before  his  death.  Mr.  Hand  had  settled  in 
Scranton  when  it  was  but  a  hamlet,  and  had  always  taken 
a  leading  part  in  local  affairs.  The  first  Select  Council  met 
in  his  office,  and  he  assisted  in  drafting  the  first  charter 
of  the  city.  He  was  one  of  the  organizers  and  the  first 
president  of  the  Third  National  Bank,  and  was  for  many 
years  a  director  of  the  Peoples  Street  Railway  Company, 
the  Jefferson  Railroad  Company,  the  Lackawanna  Mills, 
the  Dickson  Manufacturing  Company,  the  Lackawanna 
Valley  Coal  Company,  the  National  Elevator  and  Machine 
Company,    and    the    Oxford    Iron   &    Nail    Company,    and 


20  2  YALE   COLLEGE 

president  of  the  Davis  Oil  Company,  the  last  two  being 
New  York  corporations.  He  was  one  of  the  founders  of 
the  Pennsylvania  Oral  School  for  the  Deaf,  serving  as 
president  from  its  organization  in  1884  until  his  death, 
when  it  was  a  state  institution,  and  also  aided  in  forming 
the  Lackawanna  Bible  Society,  the  Young  Men's  Christian 
Association,  and  the  Home  for  the  Friendless.  He  was 
president  or  director  of  the  first  two  of  the  latter-named 
institutions  for  many  years,  and  had  also  served  as  presi- 
dent of  the  Scranton  Public  Library  (Albright  Memorial) 
from  its  organization  in  1890,  and  was  for  many  years 
president  and  a  director  of  the  Lackawanna  Hospital,  now 
a  state  institution,  located  in  Scranton.  He  was  long  a 
trustee  of  Lafayette  College,  and  had  been  an  elder  in  the 
First  Presbyterian  Church  of  Scranton  since  1867,  com- 
pleting fifty  years'  service  a  month  before  his  death.  He 
represented  the  Lackawanna  Presbytery  in  six  General 
Assemblies,  and  served  on  the  Committee  on  Revision  of 
the  Confession  of  Faith  of  the  Presbyterian  Church.  He 
was  the  first  lay  moderator  ever  chosen  by  the  Lacka- 
wanna Presbytery.  He  was  a  delegate  to  the  International 
Peace  Conferences  of  1896  and  1907.  He  belonged  to 
the  Pennsylvania  Historical  Society,  the  New  England 
Society  of  Northeastern  Pennsylvania,  and  the  Lackawanna 
Law  and  Library  Association. 

Mr.  Hand  died  suddenly  May  23,  191 7,  at  his  home  in 
Scranton,  following  an  attack  of  apoplexy.  Interment  was 
in  Dunmore  Cemetery,  in  the  suburbs  of  Scranton. 

He  was  married  September  11,  1861,  in  Montrose,  to 
Phebe  Anna,  daughter  of  William  Jessup  (B.A.  181 5, 
LL.D.  Hamilton  1848)  and  Amanda  (Harris)  Jessup,  and 
sister  of  William  H.,  Henry  H.,  and  Samuel  Jessup,  mem- 
bers of  the  College  Classes  of  1849,  1851,  and  i860, 
respectively.  She  died  on  April  25,  1872,  and  on  November 
26,  1873,  he  was  married  a  second  time  to  Helen  Elizabeth, 
daughter  of  Frederick  and  Lucy  A.  (Chamberlin)  Sander- 
son of  Beloit,  Wis.  Her  death  occurred  October  29,  1907. 
Mr.  Hand  had  six  children  by  his  first  marriage:  Horace 
Edward,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1884;  Harriet  Jes- 
sup, who  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  at  Wellesley  in  1887 
and  who  died  November  30,  1915;  William  Jessup  (B.A. 
1887)  ;  Alfred  (B.A.  1888,  Ph.B.  1889,  M.D.  Pennsylvania 
1892)  ;   Charlotte  Chapman,  who  graduated  from  Wellesley 


1857-1858  283 

with  the  degree  of  B.A.  in  1892,  and  Miles  Tracy,  a  non- 
graduate  member  of  the  Yale  Class  of  1893,  who  received 
a  B.A.  at  Williams  in  1894  and  an  M.E.  at  Cornell  in  1897. 
His  children  by  his  second  wife  were:  Helen  Sanderson, 
now  the  wife  of  John  Lyman  Peck  (B.A.  Lafayette  1893, 
M.D.  Hahnemann  Medical  College  1897)  of  Scranton; 
Walter,  who  died  in  the  second  year  of  his  age,  and  Ruth 
Boies,  who  was  married  in  19 14  to  Clarence  N.  Callender 
(B.A.  Pennsylvania  1909,  M.A.  Pennsylvania  1917)  of 
Philadelphia,  Pa.  Rev.  Alfred  C.  Hand  (B.A.  1882)  was 
a  nephew  of  Mr.  Hand;  George  F.  Bentley  (B.A.  1873) 
the  son  of  a  cousin,  and  W^illiam  H.  Jessup  (B.A.  1884) 
and  Stuart  D.  Jessup  (B.A.  1891)  nephews  by  marriage. 
William  H.  Jessup's  sons,  William  H.  Jessup,  Jr.,  and 
James  M.  Jessup,  graduated  from  the  College  in  191 5  and 
1916,  respectively. 


John  Edwin  Kimball,  B.A.   1858 

Born  July  18,  1833,  in  Webster,  Mass. 
Died  September  7,  1916,  in  Worcester,  Mass. 

John  Edwin  Kimball,  son  of  William  and  Polly  (Robin- 
son) Seaman  Kmball,  was  born  in  Webster,  Mass.,  July 
18,  1833.  His  father,  who  fought  in  the^War  of  1812,  was 
for  many  years  superintendent  of  a  mill  at  Webster  and 
later  a  carpenter  and  builder  in  Oxford,  Mass.  He  was 
the  son  of  Samuel  Kimball,  a  soldier  in  a  Connecticut  regi- 
ment in  the  Revolutionary  War,  and  Phebe  (Burrell)  Kim- 
ball, and  a  descendant  of  Richard  Kimball,  who  in  1634 
came  from  Ipswich,  England,  to  Watertown,  Mass.  The 
Robinson  family  from  which  his  mother  was  descended 
has  been  well  known  since  Revolutionary  times  in  the 
southern  part  of  Worcester  County,  Mass.  Mrs.  Kimball 
was  the  daughter  of  William  and  Molly  (Dudley)  Robin- 
son, and  the  granddaughter  of  Silas  and  Mary  (Learned) 
Robinson. 

John  Kimball  was  prepared  for  Yale  at  the  Nichols 
Academy,  Dudley,  Mass.,  and  at  the  Leicester  (Mass.) 
Academy.  He  first  entered  Yale  with  the  Class  of  1856, 
but  withdrew  in  July,  1853,  reentering  in  1854  with  the 
Class    of    1858.     In    Sophomore   year   he   was    given   two 


284  YALE    COLLEGE 

prizes  in  English  composition  and  one  in  declamation,  and 
in  1857  he  was  the  orator  for  the  Statement  of  Facts  for 
Linonia.  He  served  on  the  editorial  board  of  the  Yale 
Literary  Magazine  in  Senior  year. 

In  November,  1858,  he  became  principal  of  the  high 
school  at  Oxford,  Mass.,  where  he  remained  until  the  fol- 
lowing March.  The  next  year  was  spent  as  private  tutor 
with  a  family  near  Louisville,  Ky.,  from  which  position  he 
withdrew  to  allay  the  commotion  excited  by  his  having 
voted  for  Lincoln.  He  then  served  for  a  year  as  principal 
of  the  Ogden  School  in  Chicago,  111.  Removing  to  St. 
Louis  in  1862,  he  was  for  the  next  eighteen  years  identified 
with  the  public  school  system  of  that  city.  After  serving 
successively  as  principal  of  the  Washington  School  and  the 
Central  High  School,  and  as  assistant  principal  of  the  First 
High  School,  he  organized,  in  1871,  a  branch  high  school, 
of  which  he  was  for  a  time  the  head.  In  1879,  after  having 
had  charge  of  several  grammar  schools  for  a  number  of 
years,  he  was  placed  in  charge  of  the  Polytechnic  Branch 
High  School,  which  had  just  been  formed  by  the  consoli- 
dation of  five  branch  high  schools.  For  some  time,  he  also 
held  the  position  of  principal  of  the  O'Fallon  Polytechnic 
Institute,  an  evening  school.  In  October,  1880,  he  left  St. 
Louis  to  accept  an  appointment  as  superintendent  of  the 
schools  of  Hartford,  Conn.  A  year  later  he  took  a  simi- 
lar position  in  Newton,  Mass.,  where  he  was  located  until 
his  retirement  in  1*^84. 

Since  that  time  Mr.  Kimball's  home  had  been  in  Oxford, 
Mass.,  where  he  had  taken  an  active  interest  in  town  affairs. 
For  twelve  years  he  was  moderator  of  the  town  meetings. 
He  served  several  terms  as  a  member  of  the  Board  of 
Selectmen  and  of  the  School  Committee,  was  chairman  of 
the  building  committee  of  the  Larned  Free  Public  Library, 
for  several  years  serving  as  a  trustee  of  the  institution,  and 
was  at  one  time  chairman  of  the  standing  committee  of 
the  North  Congregational  Church,  of  which  he  was  a  dea- 
con. For  three  years  Mr.  Kimball  was  a  member  of  the 
Massachusetts  Board  of  Agriculture,  and  acted  on  the  com- 
mittee having  oversight  of  the  Massachusetts  Agricultural 
C  College  at  Amherst.  He  was  an  associate  member  of  the 
Philosophical  Society  of  Great  Britain,  a  director  of  the 
Oxford^  National  Bank,  a  vice-president  of  the  Interstate 
Petroleum  Company,  and  president  of  the  Osage  Consoli- 


1858-1859  285 

dated  Oil  &  Gas  Company  and  of  the  Boston  &  New 
Mexico  Copper  Company.  For  many  years  during  his 
residence  in  St.  Louis  Mr.  Kimball  was  a  deacon  in  the 
First   Congregational   Church. 

He  suffered  a  stroke  of  paralysis  in  February,  19 12,  and 
was  afterwards  confined  to  his  bed.  In  August,  1916,  he 
was  removed  to  a  sanitarium  in  Worcester,  Mass.,  where 
he  died  the  seventh  of  the  following  month.  His  body  was 
taken  to  Oxford  for  burial  in  the  family  lot  in  South 
Cemetery. 

He  was  unmarried.  His  brother,  Thomas  Dudley  Kim- 
ball, a  non-graduate  member  of  the  Class  of  1863,  who 
served  as  captain  of  Company  G,  Fifty-first  Regiment, 
Infantry,  and  later  of  Company  A,  Second  Regiment, 
Heavy  Artillery,  Massachusetts  Volunteers,  during  the 
Civil  War,  survives  him. 


Hasket  Derby  Catlin,  B.A.   1859 

Born  June  26,  1839,  in  New  Brighton,  N.  Y. 
Died  June  3,  1917,  in  Northumberland,  Pa. 

Hasket  Derby  Catlin  was  born  at  New  Brighton,  Staten 
Island,  N.  Y.,  June  26,  1839,  being  one  of  the  nine  children 
of  Charles  Taylor  and  Lucy  Ann  (Derby)  Catlin.  His 
father,  a  graduate  of  Yale  College  in  1822,  who  received 
an  M.A.  at  Columbia  in  1828,  was  for  many  years  engaged 
in  the  commission  business  in  New  York  City;  he  was 
the  son  of  Lynde  Catlin  (B.A.  1786)  and  Helen  Margaret 
(Kip)  Catlin.  His  mother's  parents  were  Elias  Hasket 
Derby,  2d,  and  Lucy  (Brown)  Derby. 

Receiving  his  preparatory  training  at  Phillips  Academy, 
Andover,  Mass.,  he  entered  Yale  with  the  Class  of  1859. 
He  won  a  Berkeley  premium  for  excellence  in  Latin  com- 
position in  Sophomore  and  Senior  years,  and  held  the 
Woolsey  Scholarship  and  was  the  recipient  of  a  first  prize 
in  Latin  in  Junior  year.  He  received  the  Latin  Oration  at 
Junior  Exhibition,  his  name  standing  first  on  the  appoint- 
ment list,  and  a  Philosophical  Oration  at  Commencement, 
speaking  on  both  occasions.  He  belonged  to  Brothers  in 
Unity  and  Phi  Beta  Kappa,  being  recording  secretary  of 
the  latter  as  a  Senior. 


286  YALE    COLLEGE 

He  Spent  the  first  two  years  after  graduation  teaching  in 
Brooklyn,  N.  Y.,  and  devoted  the  year  of  1861-62  to  general 
study.  Beginning  his  preparation  for  the  ministry  at  Yale 
in  -the  fall  of  1862,  he  contintied  there  for  three  years, 
completing  his  course  at  the  Harvard  Theological  School. 
In  May,  1867,  after  preaching  for  two  years  at  large,  he 
was  ordained  pastor  of  the  Unitarian  Church  at  Neponset, 
Dorchester,  Mass.  He  remained  there  for  over  three  years. 
From  1873  to  1877  he  served  as  pastor  of  the  Unitarian 
Church  at  Northumberland,  Pa.  He  was  pastor  at  Harlem, 
N.  Y.,  from  1877  to  1879,  ^at  Dublin,  N.  H.,  from  1881  to 
1885,  at  Eastport,  Maine,  from  1886  to  1896,  and  at 
Gouverneur,  N.  Y.,  for  the  next  four  years.  He  lived  at 
Brooklyn,  N.  Y.,  from  1900  to  1902  and  later  at  Edgewood 
Park,  a  suburb  of  Pittsburgh,  Pa.  In  1910  he  resumed  the 
pastorate  of  the  Northumberland  Unitarian  Church,  and 
was  in  charge  of  the  service  when  it  was  rededicated  as 
the  Joseph  Priestley  Memorial  on  October  24  of  that  year. 
Mr.  Catlin  had  contributed  a  number  of  articles  to 
periodicals. 

His  death  occurred  June  3,  1917,  in  Northumberland, 
Pa.,  after  an  illness  of  three  weeks.  Interment  was  in 
Riverview  Cemetery,  Northumberland. 

On  October  31,  1878,  he  was  married  in  Northumberland, 
to  Plannah  Taggart,  daughter  of  Joseph  Priestley,  M.D., 
and  great-great-granddaughter  of  the  scientist.  Dr.  Joseph 
Priestley  of  England,  and  later  of  Northumberland.  They 
had  two  children,  Joseph  Priestley,  a  graduate  of  the  Massa- 
chusetts Institute  of  Technology  in  1901,  and  Lucy  Helen, 
who  died  in  infancy.  Mr.  Catlin  is  survived  by  his 
wife  and  son,  a  brother,  Arnold  Welles  Catlin  (B.A. 
1862,  M.D.  Pennsylvania  1865),  and  a  nephew,  Rt.  Rev. 
Sidney  Catlin  Partridge,  a  member  of  the  College  Class  of 
1880.  His  brothers,  Lynde  A.  and  Charles  T.  Catlin,  gradu- 
ates of  the  College  in  1853  and  1856,  respectively,  died 
before  him.  He  was  a  nephew  of  John  M.  Catlin,  of  the 
Class  of  1820,  and  an  uncle  of  Rev.  Reginald  W.  Catlin 
(B.A.  1908),  whose  death  occurred  in  1914. 


I859-I860  287 


John  Werley  Beckley,  B.A.   i860 

Born  October  8,  1838,  in  Shelbyville,  Ky. 
Died  March  11,  1917,  in  Louisville,  Ky. 

John  Werley  Beckley,  son  of  John  R.  and  Elizabeth 
(Long)  Beckley,  was  born  in  Shelbyville,  Ky.,  October  8, 
1838.  His  ancestors  were  pioneer  settlers  in  this  country, 
some  of  their  descendants  serving  as  officers  in  the  Revolu- 
tionary War.  He  entered  Yale  in  1858,  and  was  graduated 
two  years  later. 

He  took  up  the  study  of  law  in  his  native  town  upon 
graduation,  and  immediately  after  his  admission  to  the  bar 
of  Kentucky  began  practice  there.  He  was  elected  to  the 
county  attorneyship  of  Shelby  County  in  1865,  and  served 
in  that  capacity  until  his  removal  the  next  year  to  Louis- 
ville, Ky.,  his  home  during  the  remainder  of  his  life.  There 
he  was  for  some  years  in  the  office  of  Harlan  &  Bristow, 
but  later  gave  up  the  law  to  enter  upon  a  business  career. 
He  was  at  one  time  connected  with  C.  P.  Moorman  & 
Company,  commission  merchants,  but  for  some  years  pre- 
vious to  his  death  was  president  of  the  Eagle  Tannery 
Company.  In  recent  years  he  had  spent  much  time  in 
New  England  on  business  for  his  firm.  His  death  occurred 
March  11,  1917,  at  his  home  in  Louisville. 

He  was  married  at  Berkeley  Springs,  Va.,  January  26, 
1870,  to  Florence  Colston  of  Baltimore,  Md.,  who  survives 
him  with  a  son,  Pendleton,  and  two  daughters,  Florence 
and  George  Mason.  The  younger  daughter  is  the  wife  of 
J.  Farrand  Williams  (B.A.  1909).  George  A.  Colston 
and  Frederick  C.  Colston,  graduates  of  the  College  in  1898 
and  1904,  respectively,  and  Dr.  J.  A,  Campbell  Colston 
(Ph.B.  1907),  are  Mrs.  Beckley's  nephews. 


Lemuel  Tripp  Willcox,  B.A.   i860 

Born  August  8,  1835,  in  Fairhaven,  Mass. 
Died  January  i,  1917,  in  Fairhaven,  Mass. 

Lemuel  Tripp  Willcox,  whose  parents  were  Amaziah  P. 
and  Susan  H.  Willcox,  was  born  in  Fairhaven,  Mass., 
August  8,  1835.  He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  the  New  Bed- 
ford  (Mass.)   Fligh  School  and  at  Williston  Seminary  at 


288  YALE    COLLEGE 

Easthampton,  Mass.  In  his  Sophomore  year  in  college  he 
was  given  a  third  prize  in  English  composition.  His  Junior 
and  Senior  appointments  were  Orations.  He  was  a  member 
of  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 

After  his-  graduation  from  Yale  he  began  the  study  of 
law  in  the  office  of  Eliot  &  Stetson  in  New  Bedford,  Mass. 
The  senior  member  of  this  firm  was  Thomas  Dawes  Eliot, 
a  graduate  of  George  Washington  University  in  1825  and 
a  member  of  Congress  for  several  years.  Mr.  Willcox 
was  admitted  to  the  bar  of  Massachusetts  in  1862,  and 
practiced  in  New  Bedford  until  191 5.  He  was  at  one  time 
a  justice  of  the  peace,  and  served  as  president  of  the  New 
Bedford  Bar  Association  from  1912  to  191 5.  He  had  been 
a  member  of  the  School  Board  and  a  vestryman  of  Grace 
Protestant  Episcopal  Church.  At  the  formation  of  the 
Yale  Club  of  New  Bedford  in  March,  1914,  he  was  elected 
vice-president  of  the  organization.  He  died  after  a  linger- 
ing illness,  January  i,  1917,  in  Fairhaven,  where  he  had 
been  living  for  over  a  year. 

His  marriage  took  place  June  22,  1865,  to  Harriet  Curtis 
Field  of  New  Haven,  Conn.  Their  only  child,  Standish, 
survives. 


Hubert  Sanford  Brown,  B.A.   1861 

Born  March  28,  1840,  in  New  Hartford,  Conn. 
Died  April  16,  1917,  in  Beaulieu-sur-Mer,  France 

Hubert  Sanford  Brown  was  born  in  New  Hartford, 
Conn.,  March  28,  1840,  the  son  of  Sanford  and  Eliza  (Ship- 
man)  Brown.  He  was  descended  from  Peter  Brown,  a 
member  of  Plymouth  Colony,  and  from  Col.  John  Brown 
(B.A.  1771),  who  served  with  distinction  in  the  Revolu- 
tionary War.  His  mother,  a  native  of  New  Britain,  Conn., 
belonged  to  a  family  of  Puritan  extraction  and  distin- 
guished in  the  history  of  that  colony  and  the  state  of 
Connecticut. 

He  was  fitted  for  college  at  the  Hudson  River  Institute 
at  Claverack,  N.  Y.  In  his  Sophomore  year  at  Yale  he 
was  given  first  prizes  in  English  composition  and  in  decla- 
mation. His  Junior  appointment  was  a  Second  Dispute,  and 
he'  received  a  First  Dispute  at  Commencement.  He  served 
on  the  editorial  board  of  the  University  Quarterly,  and  was 


i86o-i86i  289 

a  member  of  the  Beethoven  Society  and  the  Cymothoe 
Boat  Club. 

Although  Mr.  Brown  intended  to  enter  business  eventu- 
ally, he  studied  law  during  the  first  year  after  his  gradua- 
tion, spending  this  time  in  an  office  in  Hartford,  Conn., 
at  his  home  in  New  Hartford,  and  at  the  Harvard  Law 
School.  He  became  a  member  of  the  New  York  firm 
of  H.  D.  Ormsbee  &  Company,  commission  merchants  and 
dealers  in  hardware  and  metals,  in  July,  1863,  continuing 
his  association  with  that  concern  until  early  in  1865,  when 
he  was  appointed  captain  and  assistant  adjutant  general  on 
the  staff  of  Major  General  W.  B.  Hazen,  commanding  the 
second  division  of  the  Fifteenth  Corps  of  General  Sher- 
man's army.  He  received  successive  promotions  as  corps 
adjutant  general,  major,  and  brevet  lieutenant  colonel. 
After  the  final  muster-out  of  the  army  of  the  West  he  was 
on  duty  at  Murfreesboro  and  Nashville,  Tenn.,  until  being 
himself  mustered  out  of  service  in  October,  1866.  Early 
in  1867  Mr.  Brown  entered  business  in  Chicago,  111.,  as  a 
wholesale  dealer  in  glassware,  lamps,  and  crockery.  He 
was  for  a  time  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Eaton,  Maguire 
&  Company,  and  afterward  was  in  partnership  with  the 
late  Sherburne  B.  Eaton  (B.A.  1862)  under  the  name  of 
Eaton  &  Brown.  This  latter  firm  suffered  heavy  losses 
during  the  great  fire  of  1871,  but  resumed  business  at  once. 
From  February,  1875,  ^o  1890  Mr.  Brown  was  located  in 
Philadelphia,  Pa.,  as  a  member  of  the  firm  of  J.  E.  Kingsley 
&  Company,  proprietors  of  the  Continental  Hotel.  He 
then  entered  business  in  New  York  City,  where  he  remained 
until  1898. 

Since  that  time  he  had  lived  at  Beaulieu-sur-Mer,  on  the 
French  Riviera,  where  he  died,  April  16,  1917,  from  heart 
trouble  with  complications.  Interment  was  in  the  family 
vault  at  Beaulieu-sur-Mer.  Mr.  Brown,  who  was  unmar- 
ried, is  survived  by  a  sister. 


Walter  Hanford,  B.A.   1861 

Born  December  i,  1840,  in  New  York  City- 
Died  April  26,  1917,  in  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 

Walter  Hanford  was  born  in  New  York  City,  December 
I,  1840,  being  the  son  of  Philander  and  Elizabeth  (Hoyt) 


290  YALE   COLLEGE 

Hanford.  His  father,  a  prominent  merchant  of  New  York, 
was  in  business  for  over  half  a  century,  shipping  goods  to 
the  West  Indies.  He  received  his  early  training  at  the 
Collegiate  School  in  New  York  City.  At  Yale  he  was 
given  Philosophical  Oration  appointments,  and  was  elected 
to  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 

Mr.  Hanford  studied  law  in  New  York  City  for  fif- 
teen months  after  his  graduation,  but  trouble  with  his 
eyes  at  length  compelled  him  to  abandon  his  intention  of 
entering  that  profession.  After  serving  for  some  years 
as  cashier  and  bookkeeper  for  a  firm  in  New  York  City, 
he  was,  in  January,  1870,  admitted  to  membership  in  the 
firm  of  C.  L.  Woodbridge  &  Company,  importers  of  fancy 
goods.  After  the  failure  of  that  company  in  1895,  he  joined 
the  Empire  Refrigerating  &  Ice-Machine  Company  as 
secretary  and  treasurer.  This  company  had  been  formed 
for  the  purpose  of  developing  a  new  system  of  artificial 
refrigeration  for  cold  storage  and  the  manufacture  of  pure 
ice,  and  Mr.  Hanford  retained  his  connection  with  it  for 
several  years.  The  remainder  of  his  active  business  life 
was  spent  with  the  Lawyers  Mortgage  Company  of  New 
York. 

About  two  years  ago  he  suffered  an  attack  of  paralysis 
which  left  him  in  a  permanently  crippled  condition,  and 
in  September,  1916,  he  was  removed  from  his  home  in 
Brooklyn  to  the  Long  Island  College  Hospital.  There  his 
death  occurred  April  26,  19 17,  as  the  result  of  apoplexy. 
He  was  buried  in  Greenwood  Cemetery,  Brooklyn. 

Mr.  Hanford  belonged  to  Christ  Protestant  Episcopal 
Church  of  Brooklyn.  He  was  married  February  6,  1873, 
to  Helen  Eliza,  daughter  of  Harry  and  Margaret  (Bergen) 
Wilber  of  Batavia,  N.  Y.  She  survives  him  with  their  son, 
Walter  McLeod;  he  also  leaves  a  sister. 


Elliot  Chapin  Hall,  B. A.   1862 

BcTn  April  29,  1838,  in  Jamestown,  N.  Y. 
Died  April  27,  1917,  in  Jamestown,  N.  Y. 

Elliot  Chapin  Hall,  youngest  of  the  five  children  of 
William  and  Julia  (Jones)  Hall,  was  born  April  29,  1838, 
in  Jamestown,  N.  Y.,  where  his  father  was  prominently 
engaged  in  business  for  more  than  sixty  years.    The  latter. 


I86I-I862  291 

a  native  of  Wardsboro,  Vt,  was  the  son  of  William  Hall, 
who  held  a  captain's  commission  during  the  Revolutionary 
War,  and  Abigail  (Pease)  Hall.  His  wife's  parents  were 
Solomon  and  Clarissa  (Hay ward)  Jones. 

His  preparatory  training  was  received  at  the  Jamestown 
Academy  and  at  the  Delaware  Literary  Institute  at  Frank- 
lin, N.  Y.  He  entered  Yale  in  1858,  and  was  given  a 
Dissertation  appointment  in  both  Junior  and  Senior  years. 
He  began  the  study  of  theology  in  the  fall  of  1862,  spending 
two  years  at  Yale  and  one  at  Union  Theological  Seminary, 
New  York  City. 

Mr.  Hall  was  graduated  from  the  latter  institution  in 
May,  1865,  and,  having  been  licensed  to  preach  the  previous 
month,  supplied  the  pulpit  of  the  Congregational  Church 
at  Farmington,  Pa.,  for  the  next  year  and  a  half.  He 
was  ordained  at  Ashville,  N.  Y.,  on  June  13,  1866,  and  the 
next  year  accepted  a  call  to  Otto,  N.  Y.,  removing  from 
that  town  to  Kiantone,  N.  Y.,  in  December,  1869.  He  was 
pastor  of  the  Kiantone  Cpngregational  Church  until  1879, 
when  he  was  called  to  the  family  home  in  Jamestown  by 
the  serious  illness  of  his  father,  who  died  in  1880.  For  a 
long  time  he  was  a  director  of  the  Chautauqua  County 
Trust  Company  and  of  its  successor,  the  National  Chau- 
tauqua County  Bank,  and  of  the  Farmers  &  Mechanics 
Bank.  From  1908  to  1914  Mr.  Hall  served  as  president 
of  the  Jamestown  Worsted  Mills,  of  which  his  father  was 
one  of  the  founders.  Although  he  had  relinquished  his 
ministerial  duties  upon  entering  a  business  life,  he  had 
always  given  largely  of  his  time  and  means  to  the  develop- 
ment of  the  church  in  general.  He  was  for  forty  years 
registrar  of  the  Western  New  York  Association  of  Con- 
gregational Churches,  and  for  twenty  years  served  as  clerk 
of  the  First  Congregational  Church  of  Jamestown.  He 
was  a  corporate  member  of  the  American  Board  of  Com- 
missioners for  Foreign  Missions.  The  virtual  founder 
of  the  Jamestown  Y.  M.  C.  A.,  he  served  as  a  director 
from  its  organization  in  1884  and  as  president  from  1901 
to  1916,  being  made  honorary  president  when  illness  com- 
pelled his  retirement.  He  had  been  president  of  the  Asso- 
ciated Charities  and  of  the  board  of  trustees  of  the  James 
Prendergast  Library,  vice-president  of  the  Jamestown  Busi- 
ness College,  and  a  trustee  of  the  Chautauqua  Institution. 

His  health  had  not  been  good  in  several  years,  and  for 


292  YALE    COLLEGE 

thirteen  months  he  had  been  confined  to  his  bed  the  greater 
portion  of  the  time.  He  died  April  27,  1917,  at  his  home 
in  Jamestown,  and  was  buried  in  Lakeview  Cemetery  in 
that  town. 

Mr.  Hall  was  married  July  24,  1867,  in  Amherst,  Mass., 
to  Tirzah  Strong,  daughter  of  Ebenezer  Strong  Snell,  for 
many  years  professor  of  mathematics  and  natural  philoso- 
phy at  Amherst,  where  he  received  the  degrees  of  B.A., 
M.A.,  and  LL.D.,  in  1822,  1825,  and  i860,  respectively,  and 
Sabra  Cobb  (Clark)  Snell.  They  had  four  children:  a 
daughter  who  died  in  early  infancy;  Martha  Snell  (B.A. 
Mount  Holyoke  1895,  M.A.  Mount  Holyoke  1903),  who 
was  married  August  16,  1905,  to  William  Lyman  Cowles 
(B.A.  Amherst  1878,  M.A.  Amherst  1881)  ;  Elliot  Snell, 
who  took  the  degree  of  B.A.  at  Amherst  in  1896  and  that 
of  Ph.D.  at  Johns  Hopkins  in  1904,  and  Tirzah  Hinsdale. 
Surviving  Mr.  Hall  are  his  wife  and  three  children.  His 
brother,  the  late  William  C.  J.  Hall,  graduated  from  Yale 
College  in  185 1. 


Charles  Phelps  Williams,  B.A.   1862 

Born  August  19,  1840,  in  Stonington,  Conn. 
Died  August  23,  1916,  in  South  Pasadena,  Calif. 

Charles  Phelps  Williams,  whose  parents  were  Ephraim 
and  Hannah  (Denison)  Williams,  was  born  in  Stonington, 
Conn.,  August  19,  1840,  His  father  was  the  son  of  Eph- 
raim and  Hannah  Eliza  (Denison)  Williams,  and  a  col- 
lateral descendant  of  Col.  Ephraim  Williams,  the  founder 
of  Williams  College,  who  commanded  a  regiment  of  Massa- 
chusetts troops  in  the  French  and  Indian  War,  being  killed 
in  an  ambuscade.  The  earliest  member  of  the  family  to 
settle  in  America  was  Robert  Williams,  who  came  from 
Great  Yarmouth,  England,  to  Roxbury,  Mass.,  in  1635. 
Charles  P.  Williams'  mother  was  the  daughter  of  Amos 
and  Hannah  (Williams)  Denison,  and  through  her  he  was 
descended  from  Capt.  George  Denison,  who  emigrated  to 
this  country  in  163 1  from  Stratford,  England,  settling  at 
Roxbury. 

.  He  was  fitted  for  college  in  his  native  town,  and  entered 
Yale  in  1858.    He  was  forced  to  withdraw  in  Junior  year  on 


i862  293 

account  of  a  severe  and  dangerous  illness,  but  his  degree 
was  voted  to  him  by  the  Corporation  in  1893,  ^"^  he  was 
then  enrolled  with  the  Class  of  1862.  While  in  college  he 
received  a  First  Dispute  Junior  appointment. 

Mr.  Williams  went  to  Europe  shortly  after  leaving  Yale, 
and  did  not  return  until  June,  1863.  The  next  two  years 
were  spent  at  Stonington.  In  1865,  his  health  having  been 
completely  restored,  he  entered  the  brokerage  business  in 
New  York  City.  He  was  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Williams 
&  Prentice,  in  which  his  partner  was  Mr.  Sartell  Prentice, 
for  a  number  of  years.  In  December,  1890,  he  sold  his 
seat  on  the  New  York  Stock  Exchange,  and  retired  from 
business.  Believing  that  a  knowledge  of  the  law  would 
be  useful  in  the  management  of  his  affairs,  he  entered  the 
New  York  Law  School  in  1893,  and  two  years  later 
received  the  degree  of  LL.B.  In  July,  1895,  Mr.  Williams 
was  admitted  to  the  New  York  Bar,  and,  although  he  never 
practiced,  for  several  years  had  a  desk  in  the  office  of 
his  classmate,  Frederic  A.  Ward.  He  was  a  member  of 
Grace  Protestant  Episcopal  Church  of  Brooklyn. 

The  latter  part  of  Mr.  Williams'  life  was  marked  by 
impaired  health.  In  an  endeavor  to  find  a  climate  favorable 
to  his  condition  he  traveled  extensively  for  several  years. 
In  1903  he  settled  in  South  Pasadena,  Calif.,  where  the 
remainder  of  his  life  was  quietly  passed.  He  was  interested 
in  various  charities,  and  a  few  years  ago  built  and  equipped 
Williams  Hall,  a  recreation  building  at  the  Barlow  Sani- 
tarium for  Consumptives  at  Los  Angeles.  In  December, 
1912,  he  had  a  cerebral  hemorrhage,  and  since  that  time 
his  condition  had  been  serious.  His  death  occurred  at  his 
home  on  August  23,  1916.  Burial  was  in  the  Elm  Grove 
Cemetery  at  Stonington. 

Mr.  Williams  was  married  October  28,  1868,  at  Mystic 
Bridge,  Conn.,  to  Fanny,  daughter  of  Charles  Henry  and 
Eunice  (Clift)  Mallory,  who  died  June  13,  1915.  Their 
three  children  survive :  Fanny  Mallory,  the  wife  of  Albert 
Lincoln  Mason  of  Brooklyn,  N,  Y. ;  Charles  Mallory, 
who  took  his  Ph.B.  at  Yale  in  1892  and  his  M.D.  at  Colum- 
bia in  1898,  and  Kate  Mallory,  a  graduate  of  Smith  in  1896, 
who  was  married  June  30,  1903,  to  Henry  Perkins  Moseley 
(B.A.  1894,  M.D.  Columbia  1898).  Among  Mr.  Williams' 
Yale  relatives  were  his  nephews,  William  P.  Dixon  (B.A. 
1868)  and  Ephraim  W.  Dixon  (B.A.  1881),  and  his  grand- 


294  YALE    COLLEGE 

nephews,  Henry  B.  Barnes,  Jr.,  Courtlandt  D.  Barnes, 
Theodore  P.  Dixon,  Courtlandt  P.  Dixon,  2d,  and  Thomas 
S.  Barnes,  graduates  of  the  College  in  1893,  1902,  1907, 
1908,  and  1910,  respectively.  Philip  R.  Mallory  (B.A. 
1908),  John  H.  Mallory,  a  non-graduate  member  of  the 
same  Class,  Robert  Mallory,  Jr.,  and  Charles  H.  Mallory, 
who  received  the  degrees  of  B.A.  in  1909  and  191 5,  respec- 
tively, and  Holmes  Mallory,  a  member  of  the  Class  of 
1918,  are  nephews  of  his  wife. 


Benjamin  Eglin,  B.A.   1863 

Born  April  28,  1838,  in  Ithaca,  N.  Y. 
Died  August  14,  1914,  in  Lewinsville,  Va. 

Benjamin  Eglin  was  born  April  28,  1838,  in  Ithaca,  N.  Y., 
the  son  of  John  and  Sarah  (Bentley)  Eglin.  His  father, 
who  was  the  son  of  Adam  and  Margaret  (Hodgson)  Eglin, 
came  with  his  wife  to  this  country  from  Lancaster  County, 
England,  in  1830,  and  took  up  his  residence  in  Ithaca,  where 
he  became  engaged  in  woollen  manufacturing. 

He  studied  at  the  Susquehanna  Collegiate  Institute  at 
Towanda,  Pa.,  and  at  the  Rock  River  Seminary,  Mount 
Morris,  III.,  before  joining  the  Yale  Class  of  1863  in  Junior 
year.  He  was  elected  to  membership  in  Phi  Beta  Kappa, 
and  received  a  Dissertation  appointment  at  Commencement. 

After  spending  a  year  as  principal  of  the  Wellsboro 
Academy  in  Tioga  County,  Pa.,  Mr.  Eglin  accepted  an 
appointment  as  clerk  in  the  Treasury  Department  at  Wash- 
ington, D.  C,  and  took  up  his  work  there  in  July,  1864. 
While  thus  employed,  he  entered  the  Law  Department  of 
Columbian  College  (now  George  Washington  University), 
and  in  1867  was  given  the  degree  of  LL.B.  by  that  institu- 
tion. He  then  became  engaged  in  the  investigation  of 
fraudulent  and  contested  claims  in  the  office  of  the  second 
auditor  of  the  Treasury,  retaining  his  connection  with  that 
department  until  August  31,  1885.  At  that  time  he  resigned 
and  took  up  his  residence  at  Lewinsville,  Fairfax  County, 
Va.,  where  the  remainder  of  his  life  was  spent  as  a  farmer. 

His  death  occurred  at  his  home  August  14,  1914..  after 
a. year's  illness  from  paralysis,  and  he  was  buried  in  the 
Episcopal  Cemeterv  at  Fairfax  Court  House. 

On  December  18,  1872,  he  was  married  in  that  town  to 


I 862-1 863  295 

Annie,  daughter  of  Henry  Wirt  Thomas,  a  former  state 
senator  and  Heutenant-governor  of  Virginia,  and  JuHa 
(Jackson)  Thomas  of  Fairfax  County.  Mrs.  EgHn  died 
July  3,  1890.  They  had  four  children:  Julia;  Ethel,  who 
married  George  Holbrooke  Maurice  (C.E.  Lehigh  1893)  ; 
Lucy  Dix,  whose  death  occurred  September  23,  1903,  and 
Henry  Wirt  Thomas,  a  graduate  of  the  Virginia  Military 
Institute  in  1905,  now  serving  as  a  captain  in  the  United 
States  Army. 


Oliver  Hazard  Payne,  B.A.   1863 

Born  July  21,  1839,  in  Cleveland,  Ohio 
Died  June  27,  1917,  in  New  York  City- 
Oliver  Hazard  Payne,  son  of  Henry  B.  and  Mary 
(Perry)  Payne,  was  born  in  Cleveland,  Ohio,  July  21, 
1839.  His  father  graduated  from  Hamilton  College  in 
1832,  and,  after  practicing  law  in  Cleveland  for  twelve 
years,  entered  politics.  He  served  in  the  Ohio  Senate 
from  1849  to  185 1,  was  the  Democratic  candidate  from  his 
district  in  1851  for  the  United  States  Senate  and  for 
governor  of  the  state  in  1857,  was  elected  to  the  Forty- 
fourth  Congress,  was  the  candidate  for  the  Democratic 
presidential  nomination  in  1880  -and  1884,  and  served  as 
a  United  States  Senator  from  1885  to  1891.  His  wife  was 
the  daughter  of  Nathan  Perry,  and  a  descendant  of  Oliver 
Hazard  Perry,  noted  as  the  hero  of  the  battle  of  Lake  Erie. 
He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  Phillips  Academy,  Andover, 
Mass.  He  remained  with  the  Class  of  1863  only  until 
October,  1861,  leaving  at  that  time  to  accept  a  commission 
as  first  lieutenant  in  the  One  Hundred  and  Twenty-fourth 
Ohio  Infantry.  Through  successive  promotions  he  rose 
to  the  rank  of  colonel,  and  on  March  13,  1865,  was 
brevetted  brigadier-general  of  volunteers.  In  1878  the 
degree  of  B.A.  was  voted  to  him  by  the  Yale  Corporation, 
and  he  had  since  been  enrolled  in  the  Class  of '1863. 

On  returning  to  Cleveland  after  completing  his  service 
in  the  Army,  he  entered  the  oil  refining  business  with  Mr. 
James  B.  Clark,  Mr.  John  Huntington  later  being  their 
partner.  The  business  was  subsequently  absorbed  by  the 
Standard    Oil    Company,    and    Colonel    Payne    served    as 


296  YALE    COLLEGE 

treasurer  of  this  company  until  1884,  when  he  removed  to 
New  York  City.  Since  that  time  he  had  been  on  its  board 
of  directors,  and  he  was  also  a  director  of  many  other 
corporations,  including  the  American  Tobacco  Company, 
the  Virginia  &  Southeastern  Railway  Company,  the  Coal 
Creek  Mining  &  Manufacturing  Company,  and  the  Ten- 
nessee Coal  &  Iron  Company.  His  public  benefactions 
were  large,  probably  the  most  notable  being  his  gifts  to  the 
Cornell  Medical  School.  In  1887  he  endowed  the  Loomis 
Laboratory,  an  institution  organized  for  the  promotion  of 
original  research  in  chemistry,  biology,  and  pathology,  and 
for  elementary  teaching  in  these  branches,  and  he  had  also 
given  large  sums  to  the  University  of  Virginia,  Western 
Reserve  University,  the  New  York  University  Medical 
College,  and  the  Post-Graduate  Hospital  of  New  York  City. 
By  his  will,  bequests  of  a  million  dollars  each  were  made  to 
Yale,  the  New  York  Public  Library,  and  Lakeside  Hospital, 
Cleveland,  besides  many  smaller  ones  to  other  educational 
and  philanthropic  institutions.  His  death  occurred  at  his 
home  in  New  York  City,  June  27,  1917,  after  an  illness 
of  eight  months  due  to  spinal  rheumatism.  Interment  was 
in  Cleveland. 

Colonel  Payne's  chief  recreation  was  yachting,  and  he  went 
to  Europe  in  his  steam  yacht,  the  Aphrodite,  each  summer 
from  1898  to  1914,  when  the  war  caused  him  to  confine 
his  cruising  to  American  .waters.  He  had  never  married. 
His  brother,  Henry  W.  Payne,  who  died  in  1878,  graduated 
from  the  College  in  1867  and  from  the  Columbia  Law 
School  in  1870.  One  of  his  sisters  married  William  Collins 
Whitney  (B.A.  1863),  and  another  was  the  wife  of  Charles 
W.  Bingham  (B.A.  1868).  His  nephews,  Harry  Payne 
Whitney,  Payne  Whitney,  and  Henry  Payne  Bingham, 
graduated  from  the  College  in  1894,  1898,  and  1910, 
respectively.  A  niece  is  the  wife  of  Dudley  S.  Blossom 
(B.A.  1901). 


Frederick  Folger  Thomas,  B.A.   1863 

Born  October  11,  1842,  in  Factory ville,  N.  Y. 
Died  August  6,  1916,  in  Berkeley,  Calif. 

Frederick  Folger  Thomas,  son  of  William  HoUoway  and 
Angeline  Amanda  (Folger)  Thomas,  was  born  October  11, 


1863  297 

1842,  in  Factory ville,  N.  Y.  His  father,  a  merchant 
lumberman  and  farmer,  who  was  at  one  time  a  colonel  in 
the  New  York  State  Militia,  was  the  son  of  Abraham  and 
Lydia  (HoUoway)  Thomas.  He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at 
the  private  school  of  the  Rev.  Mr.  Bradbury  at  Hudson, 
N.  Y.,  and  at  Phillips  Academy,  Andover,  Mass.  His 
scholarship  appointments  in  college  were  Disputes.  He 
received  his  B.A.  degree  in  1863,  and  then  entered  the 
Scientific  School,  where  he  pursued  courses  in  chemistry 
and  mining  for  the  next  three  years.  In  1865  he  was 
granted  the  degree  of  Ph.B.  and  a  second  prize  for  his 
essay  on  "Petroleum."  During  the  year  1865-66  he  served 
as  an  assistant  in  chemistry. 

In  February,  1867,  Mr.  Thomas  sailed  for  California, 
going  from  there  to  Silver  Peak,  Nev.,  where  he  was 
engaged  in  mining  for  several  years.  In  1873  he  was 
placed  in  charge  of  the  Cerro  Gordo  Silver  Lead  Works 
in  Inyo  County,  Calif.,  and  spent  the  next  few  years  there, 
later  being  located  at  Ward,  Nev.  Early  in  1889  he 
went  to  Australia  to  become  general  manager  of  the  Central 
Broken  Hill  Mining  Company,  Ltd.,  of  which  he  was  part 
owner.  This  company  operated  a  silver  mine  at  Broken 
Hill,  New  South  Wales,  about  1,400  miles  inland  from 
Sydney,  which  became,  under  his  management,  one  of  the 
most  productive  in  the  world,  although  it  had  previously 
been  unprofitable.  He  spent  three  years  in  Australia,  then 
returning  to  California,  where  the  remainder  of  his  life 
was  passed.  He  was  one  of  the  organizers  and  a  director 
of  the  Kennedy  Gold  Mining  Company,  which  operated  at 
Jackson  one  of  the  greatest  gold  mines  in  this  country.  In 
1894  he  became  president  and  general  manager  of  the 
Gwin  Mine  Development  Company,  and  reopened  that 
property  in  Calaveras  County. 

Mr.  Thomas  died  suddenly  August  6,  1916,  at  his  home 
in  Berkeley,  Calif.     His  body  was  cremated. 

He  was  married  June  18,  1873,  in  Hudson,  N.  Y.,  to 
Nora,  daughter  of  Darius  Peck  (B.A.  Hamilton  1825) 
and  Harriet  (Willard)  Peck  of  Hudson,  N.  Y.  She  sur- 
vives him  with  their  five  children:  William  Shepard  (C.E. 
Rensselaer  Polytechnic  Institute  1896,  E.M.  Columbia 
1898);  Maud  Angeline;  John  Hudson  (B.A.  1902); 
Nora,  and  Frederick  Folger,  who  received  the  degrees  of 
B.A.  and  J.D.  from  the  University  of  California  in  1908 


298  YALE    COLLEGE 

and  191 1,  respectively.  Philip  C.  and  Darius  E.  Peck, 
graduates  of  the  College  in  1896  and  1898,  respectively,  are 
Mrs.  Thomas'  nephews. 


William  Hall  Brace  Pratt,  B.A.  1864 

Born  October  16,  1842,  in  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 
Died  August  27,  1916,  in  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 

William  Hall  Brace  Pratt  was  the  son  of  Henry  Zacha- 
riah  Pratt,  a  bookseller  and  publisher,  who  became  vice- 
president  of  the  yEtna  Fire  Insurance  Company  in  1861, 
and  Lucy  Elizabeth  (Brace)  Pratt,  and  was  born  October 
16,  1842,  in  Brooklyn,  N.  Y.  His  father's  parents  were 
Harry  and  Susan  (Cleveland)  Pratt,  the  latter  being  the 
daughter  of  Rev.  Aaron  Cleveland  of  Norwich,  Conn.  He 
was  a  descendant  of  John  Pratt,  who  came  to  America 
from  Stevenage,  Hertfordshire,  England,  in  1633,  settling 
at  Newtown  (now  Cambridge),  Mass.,  from  which  place 
he  went  three  years  later  to  Hartford,  Conn.,  as  a  member 
of  Rev.  Thomas  Hooker's  party.  His  mother  was  the 
daughter  of  Thomas  Kimberly  Brace  (B.A.  1801),  who 
was  president  of  the  ^tna  Insurance  Company  from  its 
organization  until  his  death  in  i860,  a  period  of  thirty-eight 
years,  a  member  of  the  Connecticut  State  Legislature  for 
one  term,  and  mayor  of  Hartford  from  1840  to  1843,  ^"^ 
Lucy  Mather  (Lee)  Brace;  her  grandfather.  Judge  Jona- 
than Brace,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1779,  served  as 
a  Congressman  for  two  years,  and  was  also  at  one  time 
mayor  of  Hartford,  a  member  of  the  State  Legislature,  and 
an  ex-officio  Fellow  of  Yale.  Rev.  Richard  Mather,  her 
earliest  ancestor  in  this  country,  was  born  at  Lowton,  Lanca- 
shire, in  1596,  came  from  Liverpool  to  Boston  in  August, 
1635,  and  passed  the  remainder  of  his  life  in  Dorchester, 
Mass.,  and  she  w^as  also  descended  from  Rev.  Samuel 
Mather,  one  of  the  founders  of  Yale  College,  Samuel 
Mather  (B.A.  1726),  and  Samuel  Mather  (B.A.  1756). 

He  spent  his  boyhood  in  Hartford,  Conn.,  being  prepared 
for  college  at  the  local  high  school.  At  Yale  he  belonged 
to  Brothers  in  Unity  and  the  Varuna  Boat  Club,  received 
a  third  prize  in  declamation  in  Sophomore  year,  and  was 
one  of  the  Cochleaureati. 


1863-1864  2  99 

In  the  fall  after  his  graduation  he  entered  the  College 
of  Physicians  and  Surgeons  at  Columbia,  and  three  years 
later  was  granted  the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Medicine.  Dur- 
ing the  cholera  epidemic  of  1866  he  had  volunteered  his 
services  and  was  assigned  to  the  Red  House  Hospital  in 
New  York.  He  went  abroad  in  May,  1869,  having  com- 
pleted an  interneship  of  eighteen  months  at  Bellevue  Hos- 
pital, New  York  City.  The  next  two  years  were  spent  in 
study  at  Vienna,  Berlin,  and  Munich.  On  his  return  to 
this  country  in  November,  187 1,  he  opened  offices  in  Brook- 
lyn, where  he  practiced  until  his  death.  For  many  years 
he  held  the  chair  of  diseases  of  women  and  children  at 
the  Brooklyn  Central  Dispensary,  and  he  served  for  twenty 
years  as  visiting  physician  to  the  Home  for  Destitute  Chil- 
dren and  the  Home  for  Aged  Men.  He  was  made  attending 
physician  to  the  Methodist  Episcopal  Hospital  at  its  founda- 
tion in  1881,  becoming  consulting  physician  in  1893.  He 
was  on  the  board  of  managers  of  this  latter  institution, 
being  also  a  director  of  the  Training  School  for  Nurses 
connected  with  it.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Long  Island 
Historical  and  New  England  societies,  and  for  thirty-nine 
years  served  as  a  trustee  of  Grace  Methodist  Episcopal 
Church,  Brooklyn. 

He  died  there  at  his  home,  August  27,  1916,  after  an  ill- 
ness of  two  months  due  to  hardening  of  the  arteries,  and 
was  buried  in  Greenwood  Cemetery. 

On  December  28,  1876,  he  was  married  in  Brooklyn,  to 
Mary  Harris,  daughter  of  Albert  Gallatin  and  Harriet 
(Otis)  Ploughton.  She  survives  him  with  their  four  chil- 
dren,— Albert  Houghton,  who  graduated  from  Cornell  in 
1901 ;  Lucy  Brace,  the  wife  of  Leonard  Edward  Fackner 
of  Brooklyn;  William  Brace  (B.A.  1906),  and  Marilla 
Houghton, — four  grandsons,  and  a  granddaughter.  Dr. 
Pratt's  brother,  Henry  Cleveland  Pratt,  graduated  from 
Yale  College  in  1857  and  from  the  Harvard  Law  School 
three  years  later.  A  sister  married  Edward  T.  Owen  (B.A. 
1872,  Ph.D.  1900),  professor  of  French  at  the  University 
of  Wisconsin.  He  was  the  uncle  of  Sidney  Robinson  Ken- 
nedy, a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1898,  John  Favill  (B.A. 
1909,  M.D.  Harvard  1913),  and  Leonard  Kennedy  (B.A. 
1909,  M.A.  1913).  A  grandnephew,  Wilbert  W.  Perry, 
studied  in  the  Vale  School  of  Medicine  from  1899  to 
1903. 


300  YALE    COLLEGE 


James  Harvey  VanGelder,  B.A.   1864 

Born  November  4,  1838,  in  Catskill,  N.  Y. 
Died  April  24,  1917,  in  Catskill,  N.  Y. 

James  Harvey  VanGelder  was  the  son  of  Peter  Van- 
Gelder, a  farmer,  and  Sarah  (Meyer)  VanGelder,  and  was 
born  November  4,  1838,  in  Catskill,  N.  Y.  His  father's 
parents  were  Jacob  and  Maria  (Miendes,  or  Meynderse) 
VanGelder  and  his  mother  was  the  daughter  of  William 
and  Rachael  Meyer,  and  a  descendant  of  Christian  Meyer, 
who  came  to  America  from  near  Holland  Border  in  1709 
and  settled  at  West  Camp,  N.  Y. 

He  was  fitted  for  college  at  the  Ashland  Collegiate 
Institute  at  Ashland,  N.  Y.  In  Junior  year  at  Yale  he 
was  given  a  Second  Dispute  appointment,  and  his  Senior 
appointment  was  an  Oration.  He  also  received  a  first 
prize  in  mathematics  in  his  final  year.  He  belonged  to 
Brothers  in  Unity  and  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 

Mr.  VanGelder  spent  the  first  few  years  after  graduation 
as  principal  and  instructor  in  mathematics  and  Latin  at 
the  Catskill  Academy  in  his  native  town.  From  1867  to 
1872  he  was  engaged  in  farming  at  Palenville,  N.  Y.,  after 
which  he  became  a  student  in  the  Albany  Law  School. 
He  received  his  LL.B.  from  that  institution  in  May,  1873, 
and  was  admitted  to  the  bar  of  New  York  State  the  follow- 
ing summer.  He  practiced  law  in  Catskill  from  that  time 
imtil  1890,  serving  as  justice  of  the  peace  in  1883.  From 
1889  to  1898  Mr.  VanGelder  gave  part  of  his  time  to  lectur- 
ing. While  his  son  was  a  student  at  Columbia,  he  lived 
in  New  York  City,  where  he  delivered  in  the  public  schools 
and  elsewhere  a  number  of  illustrated  lectures  on  travel 
and  history.  During  this  period  he  spent  his  summers  at 
Catskill,  managing  a  summer  resort,  and  after  his  retire- 
ment in  1898  he  made  his  home  in  that  village.  He  took 
an  active  interest  in  local  afifairs,  especially  in  regard  to 
a  municipal  water  supply  and  public  roads.  He  was  a 
member  of  the  Methodist  Church  of  Catskill  and  of  the 
New  York  Genealogical  and  Biographical  Society. 

In  the  spring  of  1906  he  suffered  a  slight  stroke  of 
paralysis,  and  the  following  August  received  serious  injuries 
in  an  accident,  in  consequence  of  which  he  had  since  been 
in  ill  health.     He  died  at  his  home  in  Catskill,  April  24, 


1864  3°* 

191 7>  the  immediate  cause  of  his  death  being  myocarditis. 
He  was  buried  in  the  Sandy  Plains  Cemetery  at  South 
Cairo,  N.  Y. 

His  marriage  took  place  August  2,  1864,  in  Palenville, 
N.  Y.,  to  Rebecca  E.,  daughter  of  Walter  and  Caroline 
(Waldron)  Pine.  She  survives  him  with  a  daughter,  Car- 
rie, who  was  married  in  1885  to  Charles  Athow  Wardle 
of  Catskill,  and  a  son,  Arthur  Pine,  a  graduate  of  Columbia 
with  the  degree  of  Ph.B.  in  1896.  Two  daughters,  Leila 
and  Alma,  died  in  early  childhood. 


Oliver  Sherman  White,  B.A.   1864 

Born  November  2,  1842,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  March  30,  1917,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 

Oliver  Sherman  White  was  born  November  2,  1842,  in 
New  Haven,  Conn.  His  father,  Henry  White,  was  the 
son  of  Dyer  and  Hannah  (Wetmore)  White,  and  a  descend- 
ant of  Elder  John  White,  who  emigrated  to  Boston,  Mass., 
from  England  about  1632.  The  latter's  grandson,  Capt. 
John  White,  is  supposed  to  have  come  to  New  Haven  from 
Middletown  Upper  Houses,  or  Cromwell,  Conn.,  about 
1720.  Dyer  White,  his  grandson,  began  the  practice  of 
law  in  1785,  and  his  practice  has  ever  since  been  carried 
on  by  his  descendants.  Oliver  S.  White's  mother  was 
Martha,  daughter  of  Roger  Sherman  (B.A.  1787)  and 
Susanna  (Staples)  Sherman,  and  granddaughter  of  Roger 
Sherman,  a  member  of  the  Continental  Congress  and  a 
signer  of  the  Declaration  of  Independence,  upon  whom 
Yale  conferred  an  honorary  M.A.  in  1768. 

He  entered  Yale  from  the  Hopkins  Grammar  School, 
New  Haven,  received  Second  Colloquy  appointments, 
belonged  to  Linonia  and  the  Glyuna  Boat  Club,  and  was 
one  of  the  Cochleaureati. 

Soon  after  his  graduation  Mr.  White  entered  the  employ 
of  T.  B.  Coddington  &  Company  in  New  York  City,  where 
he  was  located  for  the  next  four  years.  During  1868-69 
he  was  a  clerk  in  the  United  States  Commissary  Depart- 
ment at  Cheyenne,  Wyo.  In  May,  1869,  he  went  to  Labette 
County,  Kans.,  and  remained  there  until  September,  1871, 
engaged  in  farming  and  raising  cattle.  Returning  to  New 
Haven  a  month  later,  he  began  the  study  of  law,  and  in 


302  YALE    COLLEGE 

1873  received  the  degree  of  LL.B.  magna  cum  laude  from 
Yale.  He  then  entered  upon  the  practice  of  his  profession 
in  New  Haven,  and  as  a  member  of  the  firm  of  White 
Brothers,  carried  on  the  practice  founded  by  Dyer  White 
in  1785.  With  his  brothers  he  made  a  specialty  of  con- 
veyancing, continuing  a  system  of  abstracts  of  land  titles 
started  by  his  father  and  regarded  as  authoritative  upon 
the  ownership  of  land  in  New  Haven.  Mr.  White  was  a 
trustee  of  and  counsel  for  the  New  Haven  Savings  Bank, 
a  director  of  the  Mechanics  Bank,  and  a  trustee  of  the 
New  Haven  Orphan  Asylum.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
New  Haven  Colony  Historical  Society  and  of  the  First 
Ecclesiastical  Society  in  New  Haven  (Center  Church). 

His  death  occurred  suddenly  March  30,  191 7,  at  his 
home  in  New  Haven,  from  heart  disease.  Burial  was 
in  the  Grove  Street  Cemetery. 

Mr.  White  had  never  married.  Two  brothers,  Roger 
S.  White  (B.A.  1859,  LL.B.  1862)  and  Thomas  H.  White 
(B.A.  i860,  M.D.  1862),  are  living,  and  Mr.  White  is  also 
survived  by  a  nephew,  Roger  S.  White,  2d,  a  graduate  of 
the  College  in  1899  and  of  the  School  of  Law  in  1902,  and 
six  nieces,  one  being  the  wife  of  John  Rogers  (B.A.  1887, 
Ph.B.  1888,  M.D.  Columbia  1891)  and  one  of  Henry  L. 
Stimson  (B.A.  1888,  M.A.  Harvard  1889).  Four  brothers, 
Willard  W.,  Henry  D.,  Charles  A.,  and  George  E.  White, 
the  last  three  graduates  of  the  College  in  1851,  1854,  and 
1866,  respectively,  died  before  him. 


Charles  Mills  Whittelsey,  B.A.   1864 

Born  July  15,  1842,  at  Manepay  Station,  Jaffna,  Ceylon 
Died  April  i,  1917,  in  Montclair,  N.  J. 

Charles  Mills  Whittelsey,  one  of  the  three  children  of 
Rev.  Samuel  Goodrich  Whittelsey  and  Anna  Cook  (Mills) 
Whittelsey,  was  born  July  15,  1842,  at  Manepay  Station, 
Jaffna,  Ceylon.  His  father  graduated  from  the  College 
in  1834,  studied  in  the  Theological  Department  at  Yale  from 
1837  to  1840,  and  sailed  in  the  fall  of  1841  for  Ceylon, 
where  he  served  as  a  missionary  of  the  American  Board 
until  his  death  in  1847.  He  was  the  son  of  Rev.  Samuel 
Whittelsey  (B.A.  1803)  and  Abigail  (Goodrich)  Whittelsey, 


I 


i864  303 

the  latter  being  the  daughter  of  Rev.  Samuel  Goodrich,  a 
graduate  of  the  College  in  1783.  The  pioneer  member  of 
the  family  in  this  country  was  John  Whittelsey,  who  came 
from  Cambridgeshire,  England,  to  Saybrook,  Conn.,  in 
1635  and  married  Ruth,  daughter  of  William  and  Jane 
Dudley  of  Guilford,  Conn.  Their  son,  Samuel,  who  gradu- 
ated from  Yale  in  1705  and  served  as  a  trustee  of  the  Col- 
lege for  twenty  years,  married  a  daughter  of  Rev.  Nathaniel 
Chauncy,  Harvard  1661,  and  had  four  sons,  two  of  whom 
graduated  from  Yale — Samuel  in  1729  and  Chauncey  in 
1738;  a  daughter  married  Col.  Elihu  Hall  (B.A.  1731). 
His  grandson,  Samuel  Whittelsey,  received  his  B.A.  at 
Yale  in  1764,  and  married  Mary,  daughter  of  Dr.  Leverett 
Hubbard,  of  the  Class  of  1744.  A  granddaughter  became 
the  wife  of  John  Chandler  (B.A.  1772).  Charles  Mills 
Whittelsey's  mother,  who  was  a  daughter  of  Jabez  and 
Hannah  (Coe)  Mills,  and  a  sister  of  George  Lewis  Mills 
(B.A.  1835),  married  Rev.  Dr.  Thornton  A.  Mills  (B.A. 
Miami  1830)  after  the  death  of  her  husband. 

Charles  M.  Whittelsey  was  brought  to  this  country  when 
five  years  of  age,  and  was  fitted  for  college  at  the  Newark 
(N.  J.)  Academy.  In  Freshman  and  Sophomore  years  he 
received  first  prizes  in  mathematics,  and  he  was  also  given 
a  first  prize  in  English  composition  in  his  second  year. 
His  Junior  appointment  was  a  High  Oration  and  his  Senior 
appointment  an  Oration.  He  was  one  of  the  speakers  at 
the  Junior  Exhibition  and  at  Commencement,  and  was  a 
member  of  Phi  Beta  Kappa.  He  also  belonged  to  the 
Varuna  Boat  Club,  the  Beethoven  Society,  and  Linonia, 
being  president  of  the  latter  organization  in  Senior  year. 

In  the  fall  of  1865,  after  teaching  for  a  year  at  a  boys' 
school  at  Ellington,  Conn.,  he  entered  the  Auburn  Theo- 
logical Seminary.  He  preached  at  Bridgewater,  Vt.,  dur- 
ing the  following  summer,  and  late  in  1867,  having  com- 
pleted his  seminary  course,  accepted  a  call  to  New  Berlin, 
N.  Y.  He  was  ordained  by  the  Chenango  Presbytery  April 
23,  1868,  and  in  October,  1869,  removed  from  New  Berlin 
to  Utica,  N.  Y.,  there  becoming  pastor  of  the  Bethany- 
Branch  Presbyterian  Church.  His  health  began  to  fail 
about  a  year  later,  and  he  resigned  his  charge  in  1870. 
Mr.  Whittelsey  devoted  the  next  few  years  to  private 
evangelistic  work  as  his  condition  permitted,  preaching 
occasionally.     His  home  was  at  Saratoga  Springs,  N.  Y., 


304  YALE   COLLEGE 

from  April,  1871,  to  February,  1873.  After  preaching  at 
Athens,  Pa.,  for  a  few  months  in  the  spring  of  that  year 
he  removed  to  Spencerport,  N.  Y.,  where  he  served  as 
pastor  of  the  Congregational  Church  until  1879.  The  con- 
dition of  his  health  had  thereafter  prevented  him  from 
engaging  in  the  active  work  of  the  ministry  for  any  length 
of  time,  although  in  1884  he  supplied  the  pulpit  of  the 
First  Congregational  Church  at  Rutland,  Vt.,  for  six 
months.  He  lived  at  Saratoga  Springs  from  1879  to  1887, 
at  Asbury,  N.  J.,  for  the  next  two  years,  at  Providence, 
R.  I.,  from  1889  to  1907,  at  Saltillo  and  Torreon,  Mexico, 
during  1907-08,  at  Evanston,  111.,  for  a  year,  and  at 
Encanto,  Calif.,  from  August,  1909,  to  May,  1914.  The 
remainder  of  his  life  was  passed  at  the  home  of  his  eldest 
son  at  Montclair,  N.  J.,  where  he  died  April  i,  191 7,  after 
a  short  illness.  Interment  was  in  the  old  cemetery  at  Dover, 
N.J. 

Mr.  Whittelsey  had  always  been  an  active  teacher  and 
expositor  of  the  Scriptures,  and  had  written  a  number  of 
small  pamphlets  on  religious  subjects,  among  them,  "Gospel 
Work"  and  "Gospel  Truth,"  published  by  the  American 
Tract  Society.  He  served  as  stated  secretary  of  the  Rhode 
Island  Congregational  Conference  in  1905-06. 

He  was  married  October  3,  1867,  in  Rochester,  N.  Y., 
to  Louise  Amanda,  daughter  of  Abner  and  Dolly  Walker 
(Pitts)  Wakelee.  They  had  five  children:  Theodore,  who 
received  the  degree  of  B.A.  at  Williams  in  1890  and  that 
of  Ph.D.  from  the  University  of  Gottingen  in  1895 ;  Lewis 
Gates,  who  studied  at  both  Amherst  and  Brown ;  Dolly 
Louise  (B.L.  Smith  1901);  Samuel  Goodrich,  a  non- 
graduate  member  of  the  Class  of  1905  at  Brown,  and  Anna 
Ruth.  Mr.  Whittelsey  is  survived  by  his  children,  with 
the  exception  of  his  younger  daughter,  who  died  of 
typhoid  fever,  January  10,  1908.  His  wife  died  from  the 
same  disease  on  that  day  also. 


Elmer  Bragg  Adams,  B.A.   1865 

Born  October  27,  1842,  in  Pom  fret,  Vt. 
Died  October  24,  1916,  in  St.  Louis,  Mo. 

Elmer  Bragg  Adams  was  born  in  Pomfret,  Vt.,  October 
27,    1842,    his    earliest   American    ancestor    being    Henry 


1864-1865  305 

Adams,  who  emigrated  from  England  to  Braintree,  Mass., 
in  1634.  Descendants  in  the  direct  hne  from  Henry  Adams 
were:  Ensign  Edward  Adams,  John  Adams,  Obadiah 
Adams,  Nathan  Adams,  Issachar  Adams,  and  Issachar 
Adams,  the  latter  being  Elmer  B.  Adams'  grandfather.  His 
parents  were  Jarvis  Adams,  a  farmer,  and  Eunice  H. 
(Mitchell)  Adams.  They  were  married  in  Croyden,  N.  H., 
and  in  1840  went  to  live  at  Pomfret.  Mr.  Adams  took  a 
prominent  part  in  the  life  of  the  community,  being  active 
in  church  work.  Elmer  B.  Adams  was  one  of  their  nine 
children. 

His  preparation  for  college  was  received  at  the  Kimball 
Union  Academy  at  Meriden,  N.  H.  He  belonged  to 
Brothers  in  Unity  and  the  Glyuna  Boat  Club  at  Yale, 
received  Oration  appointments,  and  was  a  member  of  Phi 
Beta  Kappa. 

Mr.  Adams  spent  the  first  year  after  his  graduation  in 
the  South,  establishing  free  schools  for  poor  white  children 
in  Georgia,  under  the  auspices  of  the  American  Union 
Commission.  In  1866  he  began  the  study  of  law  in  the 
office  of  Washburn  &  Marsh  in  Woodstock,  Vt.  He  spent 
one  term  in  1867  at  the  Harvard  Law  School,  then  resumed 
his  studies  in  Woodstock,  and  was  admitted  to  the  bar  of 
Vermont  in  1868.  In  April  of  that  year  he  removed  to 
St.  Louis,  Mo.,  and  after  his  admission  to  the  bar  was  in 
partnership  for  a  year  with  Mr.  Wells  Hendershott.  He 
practiced  alone  from  January,  1870,  until  September,  1872, 
when  he  became  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Lee  &  Adams, 
his  partner  being  Bradley  D.  Lee  (LL.B.  1866).  This 
partnership  continued  without  interruption  until  1878,  when 
Mr.  Adams  was  elected  judge  of  the  Circuit  Court  of  the 
city  of  St.  Louis.  He  served  the  full  term  of  six  years, 
declined  reelection  and  promotion,  and  returned  to  the 
bar  in  1885,  as  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Boyle,  Adams  & 
McKeigham,  in  which  his  associates  were  Messrs.  Wilbur 
F.  Boyle  and  John  E.  McKeigham.  The  latter  withdrew 
from  the  firm  in  1892,  and  for  the  next  three  years  Mr. 
Adams  and  Mr.  Boyle  were  in  partnership  under  the  name 
of  Boyle  &  Adams.  In  1895  Mr.  Adams  was  appointed 
United  States  district  judge  for  the  Eastern  Division  of  the 
Eastern  Judicial  District  of  Missouri,  and  served  in  that 
capacity  until  1905,  at  that  time  receiving  an  appointment 
from  President  Roosevelt  as  United  States  circuit  judge 


306  YALE   COLLEGE 

of  the  Eighth  Judicial  Circuit.  The  United  States  Circuit 
Court  was  abohshed  by  Act  of  Congress  in  191 1,  and  the 
judges  of  that  court  became  automatically  the  judges  of 
the  Circuit  Court  of  Appeals,  in  which  office  Judge  Adams 
labored  until  his  death.  During  his  long  service  in  the 
Federal  Courts  he  participated  in  many  cases  of  great  im- 
portance, and  was  considered  one  of  the  ablest  jurists  of 
the  Middle  West.  He  was  sent  to  Salt  Lake  City  to 
organize  the  Federal  Court  on  the  admission  of  Utah  into 
the  Union  in  1896.  He  was  celebrated  as  a  lecturer  on 
legal  topics,  and  held  an  appointment  as  lecturer  on  suc- 
cession and  wills  at  the  University  of  Missouri  for  several 
years.  The  honorary  degree  of  LL.D.  had  been  conferred 
upon  him  by  that  university  in  1898,  by  Washington  Uni- 
versity in  1907,  and  by  Yale  in  19 16.  Judge  Adams  was 
a  director  of  the  American  Peace  and  Arbitration  League, 
and  a  member  of  the  New  England  Society,  the  Sons  of 
the  Revolution,  and  the  Washington  and  Compton  Avenues 
Presbyterian  Church  of  vSt.  Louis.  He  had  made  a  number 
of  trips  to  Europe. 

In  accordance  with  his  usual  custom,  he  spent  the 
summer  of  1916  at  Woodstock,  Vt.  On  October  15  he 
suffered  a  very  slight  stroke  of  paralysis,  and  left  two 
days  later  for  St.  Louis,  a  second  stroke  coming  just 
before  his  arrival.  He  died  there  on  the  twenty-fourth  of 
the  month,  after  being  unconscious  for  three  or  four  days. 
Interment  was  in  River  Street  Cemetery,  Woodstock. 

He  was  married  November  10,  1870,  in  that  town,  to 
Emma  Ursula,  daughter  of  Lorenzo  and  Ursula  (Hazen) 
Richmond.  They  had  no  children.  Mrs.  Adams  survives 
her  husband. 


William  Benedict  Bushnell,  B.A.   1865 

Born  March  4,  1845,  in  Quincy,  111. 
Died  July  5,  1916,  in  Manitowoc,  Wis. 

William  Benedict  Bushnell,  eldest  son  of  Nehemiah  and 
Eliza  Hutson  (Benedict)  Bushnell,  was  born  March  4,  1845, 
in  Quincy,  111.  His  father,  a  graduate  of  Yale  in  1835, 
was  a  leading  lawyer  in  that  town ;  he  served  as  president 
of  the  Chicago,  Burlington  &  Quincy  Railroad  from  1851 


i865  307 

to  1 86 1,  later  becoming  attorney  for  the  road,  and  was  at 
one  time  a  member  of  the  Illinois  General  Assembly.  His 
mother  was  the  daughter  of  Dr.  William  Benedict  of  Mill- 
bury,  Mass.,  and  the  granddaughter  of  Rev.  Dr.  Joel  Bene- 
dict, a  noted  divine. 

He  received  his  early  education  in  the  preparatory  depart- 
ment of  St.  Paul's  College,  Palmyra,  Mo.  At  Yale  he  was 
a  member  of  the  Nixie  and  Glyuna  Boat  clubs  and  of 
Brothers  in  Unity.  Although  he  was  absent  from  college 
during  the  greater  part  of  Sophomore  year,  he  was  able  to 
complete  the  course  with  his  Class. 

During  the  first  few  years  after  receiving  his  degree  at 
Yale,  Air.  Bushnell  was  teller  for  the  Merchants  &  Farmers 
National  Bank  of  Quincy.  He  then  became  interested  in 
the  wholesale  ice  business,  giving  his  attention  especially 
to  the  building  of  machinery  for  making  ice  artificially 
and  to  the  erection  of  refrigerating  plants.  He  was  one 
of  the  pioneers  in  this  industry,  owning  and  controlling 
many  patents  essential  to  its  success.  At  various  times  he 
was  active  in  establishing  plants  at  Quincy  and  Chicago,  111., 
and  at  Tacoma  and  Seattle,  Wash.  He  had  served  as  vice- 
president  of  the  Arctic  Ice  Company  and  as  president  of 
the  Arctic  Ice  Machine  Company  of  Quincy,  was  secretary 
of  the  Boyle  Ice  Company  of  Chicago  from  1878  to  1884, 
and  was  also  connected  with  the  Consolidated  Ice  Machine 
Company  for  some  time.  The  burden  of  his  many  activities 
told  on  him  at  length,  and  his  health  failed.  He  was  sent 
by  his  physician  to  England,  his  wife  accompanying  him, 
and  remained  abroad  until  the  spring  of  1889.  At  that 
time  they  returned  to  Tacoma,  where  Mr.  Bushnell  again 
assumed  the  active  management  of  his  affairs.  He  had, 
however,  overestimated  his  strength,  and  in  1902  his  mental 
health  gave  way,  and  he  was  forced  to  retire  from,  business, 
and  had  since  lived  a  quiet  and  retired  life.  While  visiting 
an  old  friend  in  Manitowoc,  Wis.,  in  the  spring  of  1916, 
he  was  taken  acutely  ill  and  was  removed  to  a  hospital 
in  that  city,  his  death  occurring  there  on  July  5.  His  body 
was  taken  to  his  native  town  for  burial  in  the  family  plot 
in  Woodland  Cemetery. 

Mr.  Bushnell  is  survived  by  his  wife,  Georgie  Moore 
Bushnell.  He  had  no  children.  He  was  a  cousin  of  Wil- 
liam Benedict  Bull,  a  non-graduate  member  of  the  College 
Class  of  1868. 


3^8  YALE    COLLEGE 


Henry  Churchill,  B.A.   1865 

Born  June  15,  1844,  in  Gloversville,  N.  Y. 
Died  January  7,  1917,  in  Miami,  Fla. 

Henry  Churchill  was  born  June  15,  1844,  in  Gloversville, 
N.  Y.,  the  son  of  Henry  and  Selina  (Burr)  Churchill. 
His  preparatory  training  was  received  at  the  Union  Semi- 
nary in  his  native  town,  and  at  Yale  he  was  a  member  of 
Linonia.  He  received  a  Junior  Oration  appointment  and 
a  Senior  Dissertation. 

He  remained  in  Gloversville  for  a  year  after  his  gradua- 
tion, being  employed  as  a  bookkeeper  by  C.  Hutchinson 
&  Company.  In  1866  he  removed  to  Herkimer,  N.  Y.,  and 
took  a  position  with  Warner  Miller  &  Company,  a  concern 
engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  paper.  He  was  admitted  to 
membership  in  this  firm  some  years  later,  its  business  then 
being  conducted  under  the  name  of  Miller  &  Churchill.  It 
was  subsequently  incorporated  as  the  Herkimer  Paper 
Company,  and  of  this  latter  company  Mr.  Churchill  served 
as  vice-president  and  treasurer  until  1898,  when  its  interests 
were  sold  to  the  International  Paper  Company.  In  the 
following  year  Mr.  Churchill  became  president  of  the 
Frankfort  (N.  Y.)  Linen  Manufacturing  Company,  This 
concern  failed  a  few  years  later,  and  after  completing  his 
duties  as  receiver,  he  accepted  the  position  of  secretary 
and  treasurer  of  the  British  American  Finance  Company. 
He  continued  in  that  connection  until  iqog,  when  he  became 
secretary  of  a  copper  mining  company  which  owned  large 
properties  in  New  Mexico.  He  lived  at  Cutler,  N.  Mex., 
until  191 5,  at  that  time  removing  to  Miami,  Fla.,  where  he 
purchased  an  orange  grove,  which  proved  a  great  success. 
His  death  occurred  at  his  home  in  Miami,  January  7,  1917, 
as  the  result  of  infirmities  incident  to  his  age.  He  was 
buried  in  the  local  cemetery. 

While  living  in  Herkimer,  Mr.  Churchill  was  for  some 
years  president  of  the  First  National  Bank,  and  he  was 
afterwards  president  of  the  First  National  Bank  of 
Frankfort.  He  had  also  served  on  the  Herkimer  Board 
of  Education  and  the  Municipal  Commission,  and  as  a 
trustee  of  the  Herkimer  Free  Library,  having  become  a 
member  of  the  board  of  the  latter  institution  at  its 
foundation. 


i865  309 

Mr.  Churchill  was  married  June  19,  1867,  in  Gloversville, 
to  Ella  W.  Sunderlin,  who  survives  him  with  their  two 
daughters,  May  and  Alice  Burr. 


William  Walker  Scranton,  B.A.   1865 

Born  April  4,  1844,  in  Augusta,  Ga. 
Died  December  3,  1916,  in  Scranton,  Pa. 

William  Walker  Scranton  was  born  in  Augusta,  Ga., 
April  4,  1844,  the  son  of  Joseph  Hand  Scranton.  John 
Scranton,  the  first  of  his  line  in  this  country,  was  one  of 
the  twenty-five  heads  of  the  Puritan  families  who  came 
from  England  in  1637  and  in  1639  founded  the  plantation 
of  Guilford,  Conn.  Joseph  H.  Scranton,  who  was  the 
son  of  Jonathan  and  Roxanna  (Crompton)  Scranton,  was 
born  at  Windsor,  Conn.,  and  early  in  life  went  to  Augusta, 
where  he  became  the  head  of  a  large  mercantile  house. 
He  was  twice  married,  his  second  wife,  the  mother  of 
William  W.  Scranton,  being  Cornelia,  daughter  of  William 
P.  and  Lucy  (Adam)  Walker,  and  a  descendant  of  James 
Walker,  who  came  to  America  from  England  about  1655, 
settling  at  Taunton,  Mass.  In  1847  ^r.  Scranton  removed 
with  his  family  to  Scranton,  Pa.,  where  two  of  his  cousins 
had  established  iron  mills,  and  there  he  soon  became  a 
leader  in  the  enterprises  which  have  made  the  Lackawanna 
Valley  famous  as  a  manufacturing  center. 

William  Scranton's  preparatory  training  was  received  at 
the  Scranton  High  School  and  at  Phillips  Academy, 
Andover,  Mass.  At  Yale  he  rowed  on  the  University  Crew 
in  1864  and  1865,  and  was  captain  of  the  Glyuna  Navy 
in  Senior  year.    He  was  a  member  of  Linonia. 

After  graduation  he  returned  to  Scranton  and  entered 
the  employ  of  the  Lackawanna  Iron  &  Coal  Company,  of 
which  his  father  was  president.  With  the  intention  of 
learning  the  business  thoroughly,  he  worked  for  two  years 
in  the  various  departm.ents  of  the  company.  In  1867  he 
was  made  superintendent  of  a  mill  opened  by  the  company 
at  that  time,  four  years  later  becoming  assistant  president, 
as  well  as  superintendent,  of  all  the  mills  of  the  company. 
He  went  to  Europe  in  1874  to  study  the  manufacture  of 
Bessemer  steel  in  England,  France,  and  Germany.     On  his 


3^0  YALE    COLLEGE 

return  to  this  country  he  was  made  general  manager  of 
the  Lackawanna  Iron  &  Coal  Company,  and  soon  after- 
wards built,  the  company's  Bessemer  steel  works  and  steel 
rail  mill.  Under  his  direction  and  management  the  capacity 
of  the  company's  works  was  doubled  and  changes  made 
which  quadrupled  the  capacity  of  its  great  collieries.  In 
1880,  having  decided  to  build  a  plant  for  himself,  he  again 
went  to  Europe  to  study  the  steel  situation  in  its  latest 
development  and  practice,  and  when  he  returned  to  Penn- 
sylvania founded  the  Scranton  Steel  Company,  which  was 
the  first  company  in  this  country  to  roll  steel  rails  direct 
from  the  ingot,  one  hundred  and  twenty  feet  long,  cutting 
to  four  lengths  of  thirty  feet  each.  Mr.  Scranton  remained 
in  active  control  of  the  company  until  1891,  when  it  was 
consolidated  with  the  Lackawanna  Iron  &  Steel  Company. 
At  that  time  he  withdrew  from  the  steel  business  except 
as  an  investor,  thereafter  devoting  liis  energies  to  the  man- 
agement and  extension  of  the  Scranton  Gas  &  Water  Com- 
pany, which  had  been  founded  by  his  father  in  1854.  He 
had  also  been  president  of  the  Hyde  Park  Gas  Company, 
the  Meadow  Brook  Water  Company,  and  the  Scranton 
Electric  Light  &  Heat  Company,  and  a  director  in  a  num- 
ber of  other  enterprises. 

Mr.  Scranton  was  a  member  of  the  First  Presbyterian 
Church  of  Scranton.  He  had  been  a  generous  supporter 
of  the  Yale  Alumni  University  Fund  at  various  times,  and 
several  years  ago  gave  a  large  piece  of  property  at  St. 
Albans,  Vt.,  to  the  University  of  Vermont. 

His  death  occurred  December  3,  1916,  in  Scranton,  and 
he  was  buried  in  Dunmore  Cemetery  in  that  city. 

On  October  15,  1874,  he  was  married  in  St.  Albans,  to 
Katherine  Maria,  daughter  of  Worthington  Curtis  Smith, 
who  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  from  the  University  of 
Vermont  in  1843,  and  Katherine  (Walworth)  Smith.  She 
survives  him  with  their  son,  Worthington,  a  graduate  of 
Yale  College  in  1898  and  of  the  Harvard  Law  School  in 
1901.     Two  brothers  and  a  sister  are  also  living. 


1865-1866  311 


Marcellus  Bowen,  B.A.  1866 

Born  April  6,  1846,  in  Marion,  Ohio 
Died  October  3,  1916,  in  Geneva,  Switzerland 

Marcellus  Bowen  was  the  son  of  Judge  Ozias  Bowen 
and  Lydia  (Baker)  Bowen,  and  was  born  in  Marion,  Ohio, 
April  6,  1846.  In  his  Freshman  and  Sophomore  years  at 
Yale  he  was  awarded  second  prizes  in  mathematics.  He 
received  Philosophical  Oration  appointments,  ranking  third 
in  his  Class  at  graduation,  and  was  elected  to  Phi  Beta 
Kappa. 

From  1866  to  1868  Mr.  Bowen  taught  in  Stamford,  Conn. 
He  then  entered  Union  Theological  Seminary,  New  York 
City,  but  interrupted  his  course  there  in  1869  to  go  abroad. 
He  later  resumed  his  work  at  the  seminary,  and  was  gradu- 
ated in  1872.  His  ordination  to  the  Presbyterian  ministry 
occurred  shortly  afterwards,  and  he  then  became  pastor  at 
Springfield,  N.  J.  He  resigned  that  charge  in  the  spring 
of  1874,  and  went  to  Smyrna,  Turkey,  as  a  missionary 
under  the  American  Board  of  Commissioners  for  Foreign 
Missions.  He  remained  there  until  June,  1884,  at  that 
time  returning  to  this  country.  After  teaching  for  a  few 
months  at  the  Betts  Military  Institute  at  Stamford,  Conn., 
he  opened  a  school  for  boys  at  Hartford,  Conn.,  of  which 
he  served  as  principal  until  May,  1888.  In  the  meantime 
he  had  been  chosen  to  act  as  the  representative  of  the 
American  Bible  Society  at  Constantinople,  and  shortly  left 
America  to  assume  his  new  duties.  For  nearly  thirty  years 
he  had  charge  of  the  interests  of  the  society  in  the  Turkish 
Empire,  Bulgaria,  Greece,  Egypt,  and  the  Soudan.  His 
work  in  the  Levant  had  been  very  successful,  and  his 
knowledge  of  problems  had  frequently  been  of  particular 
service  to  the  American  Minister  at  Constantinople.  The 
difficulty  of  reaching  his  entire  field  from  Constantinople 
at  length  led  to  his  transferring  his  headquarters  tempo- 
rarily to  Geneva,  Switzerland,  where  he  died  very  suddenly, 
October  3,  1916. 

He  had  returned  to  this  country  several  times  for  brief 
visits,  and  in  1904  the  University  of  Wooster  conferred 
the  honorary  degree  of  Doctor  of  Divinity  upon  him. 

Dr.  Bowen's  marriage  took  place  August  29,  187 1,  in 
West  Hartford,  Conn.,  to  Flora  Pierpont  Stearns,  who  sur- 


312  YALE    COLLEGE 

vives  him  with  a  daughter,  Lilian  Mclntyre,  the  wife  of 
Frank  Ferguson.  An  older  child,  Marcellus  Pierpont,  died 
July  26,  1874. 


Albert  Francis  Hale,  B.A.   1866 

Born  October  2,  1844,  in  Springfield,  111. 
Died  July  i,   1916,  in  Nottoway,  Va. 

Albert  Francis  Hale,  son  of  Rev.  Albert  Hale  (B.A. 
1827),  was  born  October  2,  1844,  in  Springfield,  111.,  where 
his  father  for  over  twenty-five  years  held  the  pastorate 
of  the  Second  Presbyterian  Church.  The  latter's  parents 
were  Matthew  and  Ruth  (Stevens)  Hale.  His  grandfather 
was  Dr.  Elizur  Hale,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1742. 
Elizur  Hale,  who  was  the  son  of  Capt.  Jonathan  Hale 
and  Sarah  (Talcott)  Hale,  and  the  grandson  of  Lieut. 
Samuel  Hale  and  Mary  (Welles)  Hale,  was  born  at  Glas- 
tonbury, Conn.,  on  an  estate  which  had  been  in  the  family 
since  the  seventeenth  century  and  which  still  remains  in 
a  collateral  branch.  His  wife  was  Abigail,  daughter  of 
Joseph  and  Martha  (White)  HoUister.  Albert  F.  Hale's 
mother  was  Abiah,  daughter  of  Phineas  Chapin,  of  New- 
port, N.  H. 

He  received  his  preparatory  training  at  a  Lutheran  school 
in  Springfield,  and  in  1862  entered  Illinois  College.  He 
took  the  work  of  Freshman  year  there,  joining  the  Class 
of  1866  at  Yale  as  a  Sophomore.  He  received  First  Dis- 
pute appointments,  and  was  a  member  of  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 

In  the  autumn  following  his  graduation  from  the  College 
he  began  the  study  of  theology  at  Yale,  continuing  his 
course  as  his  health  permitted,  and  receiving  the  degree  of 
Bachelor  of  Divinity  in  1870.  His  ordination  to  the  min- 
istry of  the  Presbyterian  Church  took  place  at  Springfield 
in  October,  1870,  and  after  serving  for  two  years  as  pastor 
at  Somonauk,  111.,  and  taking  a  trip  abroad  in  1872,  he 
was  for  four  years  engaged  in  home  missionary  work  in 
Kansas  and  Nebraska.  He  was  employed  by  Starr  & 
Company  of  San  Francisco,  Calif.,  from  1876  to  1879,  but 
in  January  of  the  latter  year  reentered  the  ministry.  His 
pastorates  were  successively  at  South  Vallejo,  Calif.,  Tona- 
wanda,  N.  Y.,  Junction  City,  Kans.,  and  at  Warren,  Grand 


1866-1867  313 

Ridge,  and  Ridgefield,  111.  In  1896  he  settled  on  a  planta- 
tion at  Nottoway,  Va.,  and  there  the  remainder  of  his  life 
was  passed.  He  gave  his  attention  principally  to  farming, 
but  during  the  winters  from  1902  to  19 12  taught  at  a 
freedman's  school  maintained  by  the  Presbyterian  Church 
(North)  at  Burkeville,  Va.  Since  1912  he  had  had  a  regular 
preaching  appointment  one  Sunday  each  month,  and  this  he 
filled  until  a  few  months  before  his  death,  which  occurred, 
from  cancer,  at  his  home  at  Nottoway,  July  i,  19 16.  He 
was  buried  in  Dunn  Cemetery  at  Nottoway  Court  House. 

Mr.  Hale  was  married  October  10,  1882,  in  Tonawanda, 
N.  Y.,  to  Lillian  M.,  daughter  of  Curtis  and  Melissa 
(Miller)  Taber.  They  had  four  children,  Lillian  May, 
Katharine  Frances,  Albert  Curtis,  and  Charles  Woolsey, 
all  of  whom,  with  Mrs.  Hale,  survive.  The  elder  daughter 
was  married  December  27,  1905,  to  Edward  William  Brooks 
of  London,  England,  and  has  two  children.  William  H. 
Hale,  a  second  cousin  of  Mr.  Hale,  graduated  from  the 
College  in  i860,  taking  his  LL.B.  at  the  Albany  Law  School 
in  1861  and  his  Ph.D.  at  Yale  in  1863. 


Eugene  Francis  Beecher,  B.A.   1867 

Born  March  7,  1846,  in  Boston,  Mass. 
Died  January  29,  1917,  in  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 

Eugene  Francis  Beecher  was  born  in  Boston,  Mass., 
March  7,  1846.  His  father.  Rev.  Edward  Beecher  (B.A. 
1822,  D.D.  Marietta  1841),  a  tutor  at  Yale  during  1825-26, 
later  served  for  a  number  of  years  as  president  of  Illi- 
nois College,  and  was  at  one  time  senior  editor  of  The 
Congregationalist.  Rev.  Lyman  Beecher,  his  grandfather, 
graduated  from  the  College  in  1797,  and  was  afterwards 
president  of  Lane  Theological  Seminary,  where  he  also 
held  a  professorship  in  theology ;  Middlebury  College  con- 
ferred the  honorary  degree  of  Doctor  of  Divinity  upon  him 
in  1818.  Dr.  Beecher  was  the  son  of  David  and  Esther 
(Lyman)  Beecher;  he  was  twice  married,  his  first  wife, 
the  mother  of  Edward  Beecher,  being  Roxana,  daughter 
of  Eli  and  Roxana  (Ward)  Foote.  The  pioneer  member 
of  the  Beecher  family  in  this  country  was  John  Beecher, 
who  came  from  England  with  the  Mayflower  company  and, 


3^4  YALE   COLLEGE 

in  1640,  settled  in  New  Haven  Colony.  Eugene  Beecher's 
mother  was  Isabella  Porter,  daughter  of  Enoch,  and  Anna 
K.  Jones.  She  was  a  member  of  the  Maine  branch  of  the 
Porter  family.  Her  uncle,  Rufus  King  (B.A.  Harvard 
1777),  was  the  first  minister  from  this  country  to  Great 
Britain;  he  fought  in  the  Revolutionary  War  and  was 
for  a  long  time  a  member  of  the  Senate. 

Eugene  F.  Beecher  received  his  preparatory  training  at 
Galesburg,  111.,  under  the  direction  of  his  father,  and 
entered  Yale  in  1863.  He  received  a  Colloquy  appointment 
in  Junior  year  and  a  Second  Colloquy  at  Commencement. 
He  was  a  member  of  Brothers  in  Unity. 

After  teaching  for  two  years  in  the  preparatory  depart- 
ment of  Knox  College  at  Galesburg,  Mr.  Beecher  became, 
in  1869,  assistant  editor  of  the  Brooklyn  (N.  Y.)  Union. 
A  year  later  he  gave  up  that  position,  and  formed  a  part- 
nership with  a  Mr.  Feffers,  and  in  1872  became  associated 
with  a  Mr.  Davidson,  for  the  next  few  years  being  engaged 
in  negotiating  for  Western  lands  and  loans.  He  started 
the  publication  of  the  Brooklyn  Monthly  in  July,  1877, 
retaining  his  interest  in  it  until  1882.  He  then  took  a  posi- 
tion with  the  Bradstreet  Company,  some  years  later  becom- 
ing business  manager  of  the  Brooklyn  edition  of  the  New 
York  World.  He  subsequently  left  that  newspaper  for  the 
Tribune,  but  afterwards  returned  to  its  staff.  He  was  a 
man  with  ideas  far  in  advance  of  his  time.  On  returning 
from  England  in  the  spring  of  1908  he  had  the  conviction 
that  a  world  war  was  inevitable,  unless  the  nations  could 
be  brought  to  realize  it  and  voluntarily  undertake  to  prevent 
it.  He  submitted  to  the  Bradstreet  Company,  of  which  he 
was  then  business  manager,  the  idea  of  a  world  court  upheld 
by  the  combined  navies  of  the  Powers,  whose  only  function 
should  be  the  policing  of  the  seas.  He  thought  that  Brad- 
streets  should  undertake  this  propaganda,  because  such  a 
colossal  war  would  shake  the  financial  world  to  its  founda- 
tions. Because  these  ideas  were  considered  chimerical  and 
because  his  heart  was  in  them  to  such  an  extent,  he  resigned 
from  the  Bradstreet  Company.  He  was  a  member  of  Plym- 
outh Church  of  Brooklyn,  where  he  made  his  home. 

Mr.  Beecher's  death  occurred  in  the  Swedish  Hospital  in 
Brooklyn,  January  29,  1917.  Several  days  before,  during 
a  snow  storm,  he  was  knocked  down  and  rendered  insensible 
by  a  surface  car,  and  he  died  without  regaining  conscious- 


186;  315 

ness.     Interment  was  in  Riverside  Cemetery  at  Wakefield, 
R.  I. 

He  was  twice  married,  his  first  wife  being  Susan  Wood, 
daughter  of  Daniel  and  Louise  (Rodman)  Hiscox.  Their 
marriage  took  place  October  6,  1870,  in  Brooklyn,  and  two 
children  were  born  to  them,  Loufse  Isabel,  who  was  married 
December  14,  1892,  to  William  Estabrook  Chancellor  (B.A. 
Amherst  1889)  and  who  died  August  18,  1908,  and  Clare 
Rodman,  whose  marriage  to  Frederick  Arnold  Kummer 
(C.E.  Rensselaer  Polytechnic  Institute  1894)  took  place 
October  16,  1895.  Mrs.  Beecher  died  on  May  9,  1907, 
and  on  October  29,  1913,  Mr.  Beecher  was  married  in 
Brooklyn,  to  Florence,  daughter  of  Robert  B.  Cantrell  of 
Brooklyn,  who  survives  him.  He  leaves  also  one  daughter 
by  his  first  marriage  and  six  grandchildren.  He  was  the 
nephew  of  Rev.  George  Beecher,  a  graduate  of  the  College 
in  1828,  who  studied  in  the  Theological  Department  at 
Yale  from  1830  to  1832;  of  Rev.  William  H.  Beecher,  upon 
whom  the  University  conferred  an  honorary  M.A.  in  1833, 
and  of  Rev.  Henry  Ward  Beecher  (B.A.  Amherst  1834), 
the  noted  writer  and  reformer.  Two  of  his  aunts  married 
Yale  men,  one  being  the  wife  of  Thomas  C.  Perkins  (B.A. 
1818)  and  the  other  of  John  Hooker  (B.A.  1837).  He  was 
a  cousin  of  Frederick  Beecher  Perkins  (B.A.  1850,  Hon- 
orary M.A.  i860),  Rev.  George  B.  Beecher,  a  graduate  of 
the  College  in  1861,  and  Harry  Beecher  (B.A.  i( 


William  Adorno  Peck,  B.A.   1867 

Born  November  20,  1844,  in  Hartford,  Conn. 
Died  June  2,  1917,  in  Denver,  Colo. 

William  Adorno  Peck,  whose  parents  were  Eleazer 
Adorno  Peck,  an  insurance  agent,  and  Lucy  Elizabeth 
(Wildman)  Peck,  was  born  in  Hartford,  Conn.,  November 
20,  1844.  On  the  paternal  side  he  was  descended  from 
William  Peck,  one  of  the  founders  of  New  Haven  Colony. 
His  boyhood  was  spent  at  Troy,  N.  Y.,  and  he  was  pre- 
pared for  Yale  at  the  local  high  school.  He  was  a  member 
of  Brothers  in  Unity,  and  received  a  Second  Dispute 
appointment  in  Junior  year  and  a  Second  Colloquy  at 
Commencement. 


3l6  YALE    COLLEGE 

He  Spent  the  first  two  years  after  graduation  at  the 
Rensselaer  Polytechnic  Institute,  taking  the  degree  of  C.E. 
there  in  1869,  and  was  then  employed  on  the  Morrisania 
town  survey,  which  included  the  suburbs  along  the  Harlem 
River.  In  1872  he  traveled  abroad,  visiting  Damascus  in  the 
Far  East,  Palestine,  and  Egypt.  On  his  return  to  this  coun- 
try in  1873,  he  went  to  Port  Kent,  N.  Y.,  where  he  joined  the 
engineering  division  of  the  New  York  &  Canada  Railroad, 
and  was  afterwards  engaged  in  engineering  at  Troy  for  a 
brief  period.  He  spent  the  winter  of  1876-77  in  New 
York  City,  taking  a  special  course  in  assaying  at  the  Colum- 
bia School  of  Mines.  Since  the  spring  of  the  latter  year 
he  had  made  his  headquarters  in  Colorado.  During  the 
first  three  years  he  was  engaged  in  work  at  Idaho  Springs 
and  at  Georgetown,  from  1880  to  1886  he  was  employed  in 
the  surveyor  general's  office,  and  for  the  next  three  years 
he  had  a  position  in  the  office  of  the  chief  engineer  of  the 
Denver  &  Rio  Grande  Railroad.  In  1890  he  opened  an 
office  of  his  own  in  Denver  as  a  civil  engineer  and  surveyor, 
continuing  in  practice  until  his  death.  From  1895  to  1898 
he  served  as  county  surveyor  of  Arapahoe  County.  In 
1896  he  obtained  a  commission  as  a  deputy  mineral  sur- 
veyor, and  for  several  years  worked  on  surveys  for  mineral 
patents,  later  being  engaged  on  reservoir  and  irrigation 
work.  Except  for  brief  periods  spent  in  Utah,  Wyoming, 
and  Arizona,  his  work  had  been  entirely  in  Colorado.  He 
was  a  member  of  the  Central  Presbyterian  Church  of 
Denver, 

He  died  suddenly  June  2,  1917,  in  Denver,  as  the  result 
of  hardening  of  the  arteries.  Interment  was  in  Crown 
Hill  Cemetery. 

Mr.  Peck's  marriage  took  place  in  Denver,  November  16, 
1884,  to  Mary,  daughter  of  Charles  G.  and  Jane  (Fitz- 
gerald) Holme.  Three  children  were  born  to  them :  Henry 
Holme,  whose  death  occurred  February  2,  1888;  William 
Adorno,  Jr.,  and  Mildred  Armstrong.  The  latter  graduated 
from  the  University  of  Colorado  with  the  degree  of  B.A. 
in  191 1.    Surviving  Mr.  Peck  are  his  wife  and  two  children. 


1867-1868  317 


Joseph  Warren  Greene,  B.A.   1868 

Born   November  2,   1846,  in   Brooklyn,   N.   Y. 
Died  March  25,  1917,  in  Summit,  N.  J. 

Joseph  Warren  Greene  was  born  in  Brooklyn,  N.  Y., 
November  2,  1846,  the  son  of  Joseph  Warren  and  Mary 
Augusta  (Smith)  Greene.  He  was  titted  for  college  there 
under  James  D.  Clark,  and  in  Junior  year  received  a  Dis- 
sertation appointment,  his  Senior  appointment  being  a  First 
Dispute.  He  was  elected  to  membership  in  Phi  Beta 
Kappa. 

In  the  fall  of  1868  Mr.  Greene  entered  the  Columbia 
Law  School,  and  two  years  later  received  the  degree  of 
LL.B.  The  year  of  1870-71  was  spent  in  study  at  Braun- 
schweig, Germany.  In  1872  he  took  up  the  practice  of  law 
in  New  York  City,  where  he  had  since  followed  his  pro- 
fession, being  for  some  years  a  member  of  the  firm  of 
Arnold,  Greene  &  Patterson  and  later  of  that  of  Arnold 
&  Greene.  He  was  prominent  both  as  a  lawyer  and  in 
banking  and  insurance  circles.  He  was  a  director  in  the 
Home  Life  Insurance  Company  and  the  Niagara  Fire 
Insurance  Company,  and  had  served  on  the  executive  and 
law  committees  of  the  New  York  Civil  Service  Reform 
Association.  In  1896  he  was  nominated  for  Supreme  Court 
justice  on  an  independent  ticket,  but  was  not  elected.  Since 
1900  he  had  been  Class  Agent  for  the  Yale  Alumni  Uni- 
versity Fund,  and  for  many  years  had  given  his  time 
unsparingly  to  the  management  of  the  reunions  of  his 
Class.  He  spent  the  summer  of  1903  abroad.  Mr.  Greene 
had  been  a  trustee  of  the  South  Brooklyn  Savings  Institu- 
tion, a  member  of  the  Board  of  Commissioners  for  the  Im- 
provement of  Brooklyn  Heights  and  of  the  Civil  Service 
Commission  of  Brooklyn,  a  director  of  the  Brooklyn  Young 
Men's  Christian  Association,  and  a  vestryman  of  Holy 
Trinity  Church. 

He  died,  from  heart  disease,  March  25,  1917,  in  Summit, 
N.  J.,  where  he  had  lived  since  1915,  his  home  having  pre- 
viously been  in  Brooklyn.  He  had  been  seriously  ill  for  a 
week  before  his  death.  Interment  was  in  Greenwood  Ceme- 
tery, Brooklyn. 

His  marriage  took  place  October  20,  1874,  in  Brooklyn, 
to  Julia   Strong,  daughter  of  Benjamin  IJpson  and  Ara- 


3l8  YALE    COLLEGE 

bella  Munson  (Taylor)  Sherman.  Mrs.  Greene  died  July 
12,  1895.  Of  their  five  children,  three  sons,  Joseph  Warren 
(B.A.  1899),  James  Taylor,  and  Herbert  Gouverneur 
(B.A.  1903),  and  a  daughter,  Julia  Sherman,  survive. 
Another  daughter,  Katherine,  died  in  infancy. 


William  Alexander  Linn,  B.A.  1868 

Born  September  4,  1846,  in  Deckertown  (now  Sussex),  N.  J. 
Died  February  23,  1917,  in  Hackensack,  N.  J. 

William  Alexander  Linn  v^as  born  September  4,  1846, 
in  Deckertown  (now  Sussex),  N.  J.,  the  son  of  Alexander 
Linn,  a  physician,  who  received  his  B.A.  from  Union 
College  in  1831  and  was  later  graduated  from  the  Phila- 
delphia Medical  College,  and  Julia  (Vibbert)  Linn.  His 
great-grandparents,  Joseph  and  Martha  (Kirkpatrick)  Linn, 
came  to  America  from  Dumfrieshire,  Scotland,  in  1736, 
settling  near  Basking  Ridge,  N.  J.  Their  son,  John  Linn, 
who  joined  Captain  Manning's  Sussex  County  Troop  as 
a  private  in  the  War  of  the  Revolution,  soon  being  made 
a  sergeant,  was  elected  to  the  New  Jersey  State  Assembly 
in  1803  and  to  the  Council  (Senate)  the  following  year, 
held  office  for  four  terms,  beginning  in  1810,  as  judge  of 
the  Court  of  Common  Pleas,  and  was  elected  to  Congress 
in  1819,  serving  until  his  death  in  1824;  his  wife  was 
Martha,  daughter  of  Richard  Hunt.  William  A.  Linn's 
mother  was  the  daughter  of  Horace  Vibbert. 

He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  Phillips  Academy,  Andover, 
Mass.  In  his  Sophomore  year  he  received  a  first  and  a 
second  prize  in  English  composition  and  a  third  prize  in 
declamation.  His  Junior  appointment  was  a  Second  Dis- 
pute, and  he  was  given  a  Colloquy  at  Commencement.  He 
played  on  the  Class  Baseball  Team  in  his  second  year,  was 
secretary  of  the  first  University  Baseball  Association, 
served  on  the  editorial  board  of  the  Yale  Literary  Magazine 
in  Senior  year,  and  was  one  of  the  Class  historians  and 
the  Class  Poet.  He  was  elected  to  membership  in  Chi 
Delta  Theta. 

Mr.  Linn  entered  journalistic  work  in  New  York  City 
immediately  after  his  graduation.  From  the  fall  of  1868 
to  November,   1871,  he  served  successively  as  a  reporter, 


i868  319 

assistant  city  editor,  editor  of  the  weekly  and  semi-weekly 
editions,  and  night  editor  of  the  Tribune.  For  the  next 
eight  months  he  was  city  editor  of  the  New  York  Evening 
Post.  In  July,  1872,  he  was  offered  the  editorship  of  the 
Troy  (N.  Y.)  Morning  Whig,  with  the  privilege  of  pur- 
chasing an  interest  in  the  paper.  Finding  that  it  had  no 
financial  standing,  he  resigned  in  May,  1873,  and  returned 
to  New  York,  there  accepting  the  position  of  news  and 
superintending  editor  of  the  Evening  Post.  He  remained 
with  this  paper  twenty-six  years,  becoming  its  managing 
editor  in  October,  1891.  He  held  that  position  until  April, 
1900,  when  he  resigned  on  account  of  ill  health.  He  had 
contributed  articles  at  various  times  to  The  Atlantic 
Monthly,  The  Galaxy,  St.  Nicholas,  Scribner's,  Harper's 
Young  People,  and  The  Country,  and  was  also  for  many 
years  New  York  correspondent  of  the  Philadelphia  Tele- 
graph and  the  Boston  Transcript.  Two  of  his  articles, 
printed  in  Scribner's,  were  afterwards  published  in  "Homes 
in  City  and  Country."  During  the  later  years  of  his  con- 
nection with  the  Evening  Post,  Mr.  Linn  had  been  collect- 
ing material  for  a  history  of  Mormonism  and  had  been 
instrumental  in  securing  for  the  New  York  Public  Library 
a  unique  collection  of  works  on  the  subject.  After  leaving 
the  Post,  he  at  once  began  work  on  his  "Story  of  the 
Mormons,"  and  this  was  published  in  June,  1902.  In  the 
summer  of  that  year  he  wrote  "Rob  and  his  Gun,"  and  in 
1903  he  completed  a  biography  of  Horace  Greeley  for 
Appleton's  "Series  of  Historic  Lives."  He  continued  until 
his  death  to  make  occasional  contributions  to  the  editorial 
pages  of  the  Evening  Post  and  the  literary  supplement  of 
the  Times  and  to  a  few  other  periodicals.  In  1882  and 
1883  he  studied  law  with  his  classmate,  James  M.  Varnum, 
and  was  admitted  to  the  bar  of  New  York  in  March,  1883, 
but  never  practiced. 

Mr.  Linn  became  a  resident  of  Hackensack,  N.  J.,  in 
1875,  and  had  thereafter  taken  an  active  part  in  civic 
affairs.  In  1887  he  assisted  in  forming  the  Hackensack 
Mutual  Building  and  Loan  Association,  and  was  its  first 
president.  He  had  also  served  as  vice-president  of  the 
Building  and  Loan  Association  League  of  New  Jersey  and 
as  secretary  of  the  Hackensack  Investment  Association. 
In  the  spring  of  1903  a  state  bank  was  organized  in  Hacken- 
sack under  the  name  of  the  Peoples  National  Bank,  and 


320  YALE    COLLEGE 

Mr.  Linn  was  made  its  first  president,  continuing  in  that 
office  until  1915.  In  1910  he,  with  other  directors  of  this 
bank,  organized  the  First  National  Bank  of  Ridgefield 
Park,  a  near-by  New  Jersey  town,  and  served  as  its  presi- 
dent for  the  next  three  years.  He  was  appointed  county 
collector  for  Bergen  County  in  191 5,  being  reappointed  to 
that  office  for  a  term  of  two  years  in  January,  19 17.  He 
served  on  the  commission  which  secured  the  passage  by 
the  legislatures  of  New  Jersey  and  New  York  of  the  law 
under  which  the  Palisades  Interstate  Park  Commission 
was  established,  and  was  a  member  of  this  latter  commission 
from  its  inception  until  1912.  He  was  for  a  time  a  director 
of  the  Hackensack  Hall  and  Armory  Association  and  of 
the  Johnson  Public  Library.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
New  Jersey  and  Bergen  County  Historical  societies,  and 
served  at  one  time  as  president  of  the  Bergen  County 
Republican  Club.  In  1895  he  purchased  a  farm  of  one 
hundred  and  seventy-two  acres  in  Sussex  County,  N.  J., 
and  there  he  had  large  peach  and  apple  orchards  and  a 
dairy  of  between  thirty  and  forty  cows. 

Mr.  Linn's  death  occurred  suddenly  February  23,  1917, 
at  his  home  in  Hackensack,  as  the  result  of  heart  disease. 
He  was  buried  in  North  Church  Cemetery  in  Hardyston 
Township,  Sussex  County.  '  By  the  terms  of  his  will,  a 
non-sectarian  hospital  is  to  be  founded  and  maintained  in 
Sussex  in  memory  of  his  father.  He  bequeathed  his  books 
and  pamphlets  on  Mormonism  to  Yale. 

On  January  31,  1871,  he  was  married  in  New  York 
City,  to  Margaret  A.  Martin,  who  died  March  5,  1897. 
They  had  no  children.  Mr.  Linn  is  survived  by  two 
brothers. 


Thomas  Hamlin  Robbins,  B.A.   1868 

Born  November  4,  1841,  in  Rocky  Hill,  Conn. 
Died  June  13,  1916,  at  Colorado  Springs,  Colo. 

Thomas  Hamlin  Robbins  was  born  at  Rocky  Hill,  Conn., 
November  4,  1841,  being  the  only  son  of  Allen  Austin 
Robbins,  a  farmer,  and  Abby  Ann  (Goodrich)  Robbins. 
.On  the  paternal  side  he  was  descended  from  John  and 
Hester  Robbins,  who  came  to  this  country  from  England 


i868  321 

with  five  of  their  sons  about  1640.  His  father's  parents 
were  Allen  and  Amelia  (Bulkley)  Robbins,  the  latter  being 
the  great-granddaughter  of  Rev.  Peter  Bulkley.  His 
mother  was  the  daughter  of  Jason  and  Anna  Dunning 
(Goff)  Goodrich,  and  the  granddaughter  of  Gideon  Goff, 
a  Revolutionary  soldier. 

His  preparatory  training  was  begun  under  the  instruction 
of  Simeon  T.  Frost  (B.A.  1857),  then  principal  of  Lewis 
Academy,  Southington,  Conn.,  and  he  later  entered  the 
Hudson  River  Institute  at  Claverack,  N.  Y.,  interrupting 
his  course  there  to  enlist  in  the  Twenty-fifth  Connecticut 
Volunteers,  with  which  he  served  as  a  corporal  in  Louisi- 
ana until  August  26,  1863.  At  that  time  he  resumed  his 
studies  at  Claverack,  entering  Yale  in  the  fall  of  1864 
with  the  Class  of  1868.  He  received  Oration  appointments, 
and  was  a  member  of  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 

Mr.  Robbins  was  an  assistant  to  his  former  instructor, 
Mr.  Frost,  at  the  Amenia  (N.  Y.)  Seminary  for  four 
years  following  his  graduation.  He  then  went  West,  and 
for  more  than  a  year  was  engaged  in  civil  engineering. 
Business  conditions  at  the  time  were  unfavorable  to  railroad 
construction  and  to  new  enterprises  generally,  and  he 
returned  East  in  October,  1873,  assuming  temporarily  his 
old  position  in  the  seminary  at  Amenia.  He  was  later 
able  to  return  to  civil  engineering,  his  work  being  chiefly 
in  the  Middle  West,  and  was  active  in  his  profession  until 
within  a  year  or  two  of  his  death.  His  home  during  the 
last  twenty  years  of  his  life  was  at  Colorado  Springs,  Colo., 
where  he  died  June  13,  1916,  after  a  brief  illness. 

He  was  married  May  5,  1895,  to  Mrs.  C.  A.  Zimmerman, 
whose  death  occurred  August  15,  1909.  They  had  no 
children.    Mr.  Robbins  is  survived  by  a  sister. 


John  Leonard  Varick,  B.A.   1868 

Born  December  i,   1846,  in  Poughkeepsie,  N.  Y. 
Died  July  6,  1916,  in  'New  York  City- 
John   Leonard  Varick,   son  of   Abraham  and   Margaret 
VanSchaick  (Bronk)  Varick,  was  born  December  i,  1846, 
in  Poughkeepsie,  N.  Y.     His  father  was  the  son  of  John 
Vredenburg    and    Maria    A.     (Remsen)     Varick,    and    a 


322  YALE    COLLEGE 

descendant  of  John  Varick,  who  came  to  America  from 
Holland  about  1687.  Two  great-great-uncles,  Col.  Richard 
Varick  and  John  Varick,  served  in  the  Revolution,  the 
former  being  private  secretary  to  Washington,  and  the 
latter  a  surgeon  general;  Richard  Varick  was  mayor  of 
New  York  from  1789  to  1800.  Through  his  mother, 
whose  parents  were  John  Leonard  and  Alida  (Conine) 
Bronk,  J.  Leonard  Varick  was  descended  from  Jonas 
Bronk,  who  emigrated  to  this  country  from  Holland  and 
became  the  principal  owner  of  the  land  in  that  district  of 
New  York  City  which  is  now  known  as  the  Bronx.  His 
great-grandfather,  Leonard  Bronk,  was  the  first  judge  of 
Greene  County,  N.  Y.  Philip  Conine,  another  great-grand- 
father, served  in  the  Revolution. 

His  preparatory  training  was  received  at  Warring's  Mili- 
tary Academy  at  Poughkeepsie,  from  which  he  entered 
Yale  in  1864.  His  scholarship  appointments  were  Orations, 
and  he  was  a  member  of  Phi  Beta  Kappa.  He  served  as 
secretary  of  Brothers  in  Unity,  and  played  third  base  on 
the  University  Baseball  Team. 

Mr.  Varick  entered  the  hardware  business  in  New  York 
City  shortly  after  his  graduation,  being  for  nearly  forty- 
five  years  associated  with  the  Upson,  Post  &  Frisbie  Com- 
pany and  the  Union  Nut  Company,  the  selling  agents  in 
New  York  of  the  Upson  Nut  Company  of  Unionville, 
Conn.,  and  Cleveland,  Ohio.  He  had  been  a  director  of 
the  Upson  Nut  Company  and  treasurer  of  the  Union  Nut 
&  Bolt  Company,  which  succeeded  the  Union  Nut  Com- 
pany, and  had  also  served  as  president  of  the  Composite 
Iron  Works  Company  of  New  York  and  as  a  director  in 
the  Millers  Falls  Company  of  Millers  Falls,  Mass.  In 
1892  he  became  a  member  of  the  board  of  governors  of 
the  Hardware  Club,  which  was  incorporated  at  that  time, 
and  at  various  times  held  office  as  secretary,  vice-president, 
and  president. 

Mr.  Varick  retired  from  business  in  19 13.  He  lived  in 
Brooklyn  for  some  time,  but  in  recent  years  had  resided 
in  New  York  City.  He  w^s  a  trustee  of  the  Holland  and 
Dutchess  County  societies,  being  president  of  the  latter 
from  1905  to  1907. 

His  death  occurred  July  6,  1916,  in  New  York  City, 
after  an  illness  of  several  days  due  to  heart  trouble.  Inter- 
ment was  in  the  Kensico  Cemetery. 


1868-1869  323 

On  October  16,  1883,  Mr.  Varick  was  married  in  New 
York  City  to  Julie  Henriques,  daughter  of  Elias  and  Sarah 
(Seixas)  deLeon  of  Venezuela,  who  survives  him  without 
children. 


Henry  Varnum  Freeman,  B.A.   1869 

Born  December  20,  1842,  in  Bridgeton,  N.  J. 
Died  September  5,  1916,  en  route  to  Chicago,  111. 

Henry  Varnum  Freeman,  whose  parents  were  Henry 
and  Mary  B.  (Bangs)  Freeman,  was  born  in  Bridgeton, 
N.  J.,  December  20,  1842.  His  father,  who  was  for  several 
years  principal  of  Wallkill  Academy  at  Middletown,  N.  Y., 
and  later  superintendent  of  the  schools  of  Rockford,  111., 
was  the  son  of  Solomon  and  Abigail  (Clark)  P>eeman,  and 
was  descended  from  Edmund  Freeman,  who  came  to 
Massachusetts  from  Devonshire,  England,  about  1630. 
His  mother  was  the  daughter  of  Elkanah  and  Reliance 
(Berry)  Bangs;  her  earliest  American  ancestor  was 
Edward  Bangs,  who  came  from  England  in  1623,  settling 
in  Massachusetts. 

The  greater  part  of  his  early  life  was  spent  in  New  Eng- 
land, but  in  1 86 1  he  entered  the  preparatory  department 
of  Beloit  College,  where  he  spent  one  year.  He  was 
admitted  to  Beloit  College  in  1862,  but  did  not  begin  his 
course,  as  in  August  of  that  year  he  enlisted  in  Com- 
pany K,  Seventy-fourth  Illinois  Infantry,  of  which  he  was 
made  first  sergeant.  On  August  24,  1863,  he  was  promoted 
to  be  captain  of  the  Twelfth  Colored  Infantry,  with 
which  he  served  until  receiving  his  honorable  discharge 
in  July,  1865.  He  entered  Yale  shortly  afterwards,  and 
in  his  Sophomore  year  was  given  two  prizes  in  English 
composition  and  one  in  declamation.  As  a  Senior  he 
received  a  Townsend  premium  and  a  first  prize  in  English 
composition.    He  served  as  a  Class  Deacon. 

In  the  fall  following  his  graduation  he  took  up  the  study 
of  lav/  in  Chicago,  at  first  in  the  office  of  Hibbard,  Rich  & 
Noble  and  later  in  that  of  King,  Scott  &  Payson.  In  1871 
he  interrupted  his  studies  to  serve  for  a  year  as  principal 
of  the  Charleston  (111.)  High  School,  but  in  July,  1872, 
was  admitted  to   the  bar  of   Illinois.     Early  in   the  next 


32  4  YALE    COLLEGE 

year  he  opened  an  office  in  Chicago,  where  he  conducted 
a  general  practice  until  November,  1893,  when  he  was 
elected  judge  of  the  Superior  Court.  He  served  on  the 
bench,  through  successive  appointments,  until  the  latter 
part  of  1915,  retiring  at  that  time  on  account  of  failing 
health  resulting  from  the  effects  of  an  automobile  accident. 
In  February,  1898,  he  was  appointed  a  justice  of  the  Appel- 
late Court,  becoming  presiding  justice  the  following  June, 

Judge  Freeman  had  served  as  professorial  lecturer  on 
legal  ethics  and  medical  jurisprudence  at  the  University 
of  Chicago,  and  as  lecturer  on  legal  ethics  in  its  Law 
Department.  His  home  had  been  at  Hyde  Park  since 
1873,  and  during  1878-79  he  served  as  corporation  counsel 
for  the  village.  He  was  a  frequent  contributor  to  legal 
journals,  and  had  delivered  a  number  of  addresses  before 
various  organizations.  He  wrote  "The  Colored  Brigade 
in  the  Campaign  and  Battle  of  Nashville,"  volume  two  of 
"Military  Essays  and  Recollections,"  and  volume  three  of 
"Some  Battle  Recollections  of  Stone  River."  In  1898  he 
became  president  of  the  Chicago  Literary  Club,  and  the  next 
year  was  chosen  commander  of  the  Illinois  Commandery  of 
the  Military  Order  of  the  Loyal  Legion.  During  1904-05  he 
served  as  governor  of  the  Society  of  Mayflower  Descendants, 
and  in  1907-08  was  president  of  the  Yale  Club  of  Chicago. 
Judge  Freeman  was  a  director  of  McCormick  Theological 
Seminary  from  1905  until  his  death  and  of  the  Chicago 
Public  Library  from  1910  to  191 3.  For  twenty-eight  years 
he  was  an  elder  in  the  Hyde  Park  Presbyterian  Church. 
In  1887  he  went  abroad,  and  since  his  retirement  he  had 
spent  much  time  in  travel,  principally  in  Florida  and 
California. 

lie  died  suddenly,  from  heart  failure,  September  5,  1916, 
while  returning  to  Chicago  from  his  summer  home  at  Har- 
bor Point,  Mich.  Burial  was  in  West  Side  Cemetery  at 
Rockford,  111. 

His  marriage  took  place  October  16,  1873,  in  that  city, 
to  Marv  L.,  daughter  of  Rev.  William  Stanton  Curtis, 
D.D.  (B.A.  Illinois  College  1838),  who  studied  for  three 
years  in  the  Theological  Department  at  Yale,  and  Martha 
A.  (Leach)  Curtis,  a  graduate  of  Mount  Holyoke  Seminary 
(now  College)  in  1839.  They  had  four  children:  Mabel  D., 
the  wife  of  Rev.  Henry  C.  Culbertson  (B.A.  Cincinnati 
1895,  B.D.  Chicago  1900,  D.D.  Lenox  1910),  now  president 


1869  325 

of  the  College  of  Emporia;  Mary  Ethel  (Ph.B.  Chicago 
1901),  who  was  married  June  20,  1907,  to  Reuben  Myron 
Strong  (B.A.  Oberlin  1897,  M.A.  Harvard  1899,  Ph.D. 
Harvard  1901),  professor  of  anatomy  at  Vanderbilt  Med- 
ical College ;  Helen  A.,  a  graduate  of  the  University  of 
Chicago  with  the  degree  of  Ph.B.  in  1905,  and  Henry  B. 
(M.E.  Cornell  1910).  Mrs.  Freeman  and  all  their  children 
survive.  Mrs.  Freeman's  brother,  Edward  Lewis  Curtis, 
graduated  from  the  College  in  1874,  and  was  for  a  number 
of  years  professor  of  Hebrew  languages  and  literature  at 
Yale,  being  from  1905  to  191 1  acting  dean  of  the  School 
of  Religion.  The  latter's  son,  Edward  E.  Curtis,  received 
his  B.A.  from  Yale  in  1910,  his  M.A..  in  191 1,  and  his 
Ph.D.  in  1916,  and  two  of  his  daughters  have  married  Yale 
graduates,  one  being  the  wife  of  Professor  George  Dahl 
(B.A.  1908,  M.A.  1909,  Ph.D.  1913)  and  the  other  of 
Rev.  Plugh  Hartshorne  (B.A.  Amherst  1907,  M.A.  Yale 
1910,  B.D.  Yale  191 1,  Ph.D.  Columbia  1913). 


John  R.  Thayer,  B.A.   1869 

Born  March  9,  1845,  in  Douglass,  Mass. 
Died  December  19,  1916,  in  Worcester,  Mass. 

John  R.  Thayer,  whose  parents  were  Mowry  Richardson 
and  Harriet  (Morse)  Thayer,  was  born  March  9,  1845, 
in  Douglass,  Mass.,  and  was  fitted  for  college  at  Nichols 
Academy  in  the  near-by  town  of  Dudley.  His  ancestors 
came  to  America  from  Scotland  before  the  Revolutionary 
War,  and  settled  in  Mendon,  Mass. 

After  his  graduation  from  Yale  in  1869  he  read  law 
in  the  office  of  Judge  Henry  Chapin  of  Worcester  for 
two  years,  being  admitted  to  the  bar  of  Massachusetts 
in  1 87 1.  Shortly  afterwards  he  formed  a  partnership 
with  Col.  William  A.  Williams,  which  continued  for 
six  years.  He  then  became  associated  with  Charles  H. 
Chapin  under  the  firm  name  of  Thayer  &  Chapin.  From 
1885  to  1906  Mr.  Thayer  was  a  member  of  the  firm 
of  Thayer  &  Rugg,  his  partner  being  Arthur  P.  Rugg, 
who  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  from  Amherst  in  1883 
and  that  of  LL.B.  from  Boston  Universitv  in  1886. 
Mr.  Rugg  withdrew  from  the  firm  in  1906,  when  he  was 


326  YALE    COLLEGE 

appointed  a  justice  of  the  Supreme  Court  of  Massachusetts, 
and  at  that  time  Mr.  Thayer's  eldest  son,  who  had  been  in 
his  office  for  several  years,  became  his  partner,  the  firm 
name  being  changed  to  Thayer  &  Thayer.  On  the  latter's 
death  in  1912,  Mr.  Thayer  joined  the  firm  of  Bullock  & 
Thayer,  of  which  Alexander  H.  Bullock  (B.A.  Harvard 
1896)  was  the  senior  and  his  second  son,  John  M.  Thayer, 
the  junior  member.  The  name  of  the  firm  then  became 
Thayer,  Bullock  &  Thayer,  and  Mr.  Thayer  continued  his 
association  with  it  until  his  death.  In  his  early  practice 
he  gave  his  attention  largely  to  the  trial  of  cases  to  the 
jury,  and  in  his  later  years  he  was  engaged  chiefly  in  the 
trial  of  civil  cases.  He  was  president  of  the  Worcester 
Bar  Association  from  1910  to  1913. 

He  was  a  Democrat,  and  from  the  beginning  of  his  career 
took  an  active  interest  in  politics,  and  much  of  his  time 
was  devoted  to  public  service.  He  frequently  spoke  at 
political  gatherings.  He  served  on  the  Worcester  Common 
Council  from  1877  to  1880  and  on  the  Board  of  Aldermen 
from  1 88 1  to  1884,  and  he  was  a  member  of  the  Massa- 
chusetts House  of  Representatives  in  1880  and  1881  and 
of  the  State  Senate  in  1890  and  1891.  He  served  upon 
the  judiciary  committee,  and  was  considered  one  of  the 
leading  members  of  the  General  Assembly.  In  1898  he 
was  elected  to  Congress  from  the  third  Massachusetts 
district,  and  served  until  1905,  when  he  refused  to  be  a 
candidate  for  renomination.  Besides  the  oflices  which  he 
filled,  he  ran  for  mayor  of  Worcester  in  1892,  but  was 
defeated  by  a  small  majority,  and  he  had  declined  an 
appointment  to  the  Superior  Court. 

Mr.  Thayer  was  a  member  of  All  Saints'  Protestant 
Episcopal  Church  of  Worcester.  He  served  as  a  trustee 
of  Nichols  Academy  for  fifteen  years.  He  owned  a  farm 
at  Pomfret,  Conn.,  where  he  spent  his  leisure  time,  and 
while  there  devoted  much  time  to  fox-hunting,  in  which 
he  was  keenly  interested.  Although  his  health  had  been 
poor  for  nearly  four  years,  he  was  able  to  give  his  attention 
to  his  practice  until  within  a  few  weeks  of  his  death,  which 
occurred  at  his  home  in  Worcester,  December  19,  1916. 
Burial  was  in  Rural  Cemetery,  Worcester. 

His  marriage  took  place  January  30,  1873,  in  Worces- 
ter, to  Charlotte  H.,  daughter  of  Pitt  and  Diana 
(Perrin)    Holmes,    and    sister    of    Henry    Perrin    Holmes 


I 


1869-1870  32  7 

(B.A.  1866).  They  had  six  children:  Henry  Holmes, 
who  received  the  degrees  of  B.A.  and  LL.B.  from 
Harvard  in  1896  and  1899,  respectively,  and  who  died 
November  28,  1912;  John  Mowry  (B.A.  Harvard  1898); 
Charlotte  Diana;  Marguerite  Elizabeth,  who  married  Wil- 
liam Carter  Quinby,  a  graduate  of  Harvard  College  in 
1899  and  of  the  Harvard  Medical  School  in  1902;  Mary 
Perrin;  and  Edward  Carrington  (B.A.  Harvard  1915, 
LL.B.  Harvard  1917).  Besides  his  five  children,  Mr. 
Thayer  is  survived  by  a  brother  and  a  sister.  His  cousin, 
John  M.  Thayer,  also  graduated  from  Yale  in  1869. 


Randall  Spaulding,  B.A.   1870 

Born  February  3,   1845,   in  Townsend,  Mass. 
Died  October  24,  1916,  in  Montclair,  N.  J. 

Randall  Spaulding,  son  of  Daniel  and  Lucy  Wyer 
(Clement)  Spaulding,  was  born  February  3,  1845,  i" 
Townsend,  Mass.  Members  of  the  Spaulding  family  emi- 
grated to  America  from  Spalding,  England,  early  in  the 
seventeenth  century,  settling  at  Braintree,  Mass.  Daniel 
Spaulding's  parents  were  Lsaac  and  Lucy  (Emery)  Spauld- 
ing, and  he  was  the  grandson  of  Benjamin  Spaulding,  a 
lieutenant  in  the  Revolutionary  Army,  and  Mary  Heald 
Spaulding.  His  wife  was  the  daughter  of  John  and  Hannah 
(Pierce)  Clement. 

He  received  his  preparation  for  Yale  at  Lawrence  Acad- 
emy, Groton,  Mass.  He  was  a  member  of  Brothers  in 
Unity,  and  in  their  prize  debate  Sophomore  year  received 
third  prize.  He  was  also  given  a  third  prize  in  English 
composition  that  year,  and  in  Junior  year  received  an  Ora- 
tion appointment.  His  Senior  appointment  was  a  High 
Oration,  and  he  was  a  member  of  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 

In  the  autumn  of  1870  Mr.  Spaulding  went  to  Rockville, 
Conn.,  then  a  village  of  some  five  or  six  thousand  people, 
to  teach  school.  At  that  time  there  were  only  district 
schools  in  the  place,  but  within  a  short  time  Mr.  Spaulding 
was  able,  with  the  co-operation  of  some  public-spirited  men 
and  women,  to  expand  the  upper  grade  of  the  East  District 
School,  where  he  was  teaching,  into  a  firmly  established 
high   school,   from   which,   in    1873,   two  boys,   the   entire 


328  YALE    COLLEGE 

graduating  class,  entered  Yale  without  conditions.  His 
influence  among  his  pupils  was  very  strong,  and  it  is 
worthy  of  note  that  of  the  ten  or  twelve  eldest  among 
them,  with  whom  he  came  in  closest  contact,  nearly  all 
attained  to  places  of  honor  and  trust  in  later  life.  In  1874, 
after  a  year  spent  in  travel  and  study  abroad,  principally 
at  Gottingen  and  Heidelberg,  Mr.  Spaulding  became  super- 
intendent of  the  schools  of  Montclair,  N.  J.,  a  position  which 
he  filled  with  remarkable  success  for  thirty-eight  years,  at 
the  end  of  which  time  he  resigned  on  account  of  failing 
health.  When  he  began  his  work  in  Montclair,  the  schools 
over  which  he  had  supervision,  and  where  he  also  acted 
as  principal  and  teacher,  consisted  of  but  two  or  three  build- 
ings. At  the  time  of  his  retirement  he  had  the  satisfaction 
of  seeing  several  fine  buildings  in  various  sections  of  the 
city,  with  an  attendance  of  three  thousand  children,  and 
the  knowledge  that  the  fame  of  Montclair's  schools  had 
spread  through  the  East. 

He  had  held  many  positions  of  honor  in  the  educational 
organizations  to  which  he  belonged,  being  at  various  times 
president  of  the  Schoolmasters'  Club  of  New  York,  the 
Schoolmasters'  Association  of  New  York  and  Vicinity,  and 
the  New  Jersey  Council  of  Education,  and  treasurer  of  the 
Headmasters'  Association  of  the  United  States.  He  was 
a  member  of  the  First  Congregational  Church  of  Montclair, 
and  in  1899-1900  held  the  office  of  president  of  the  Con- 
gregational Club  of  New  York  and  Vicinity.  He  was 
deeply  interested  in  photography,  and  some  years  ago  his 
book,  "First  Lessons  in  Amateur  Photography,"  was 
published.  He  had  been  president  of  the  New  York  Society 
of  Amateur  Photographers  and  the  Postal  Photographic 
Club,  an  organization  including  members  from  most  of  the 
Eastern  and  Western  states.  During  his  vacations  Mr. 
Spaulding  traveled  extensively  in  this  country,  many  of 
his  trips  being  taken  on  foot.  He  was  fond  of  the  moun- 
tains, and  climbed  many  of  the  highest  peaks  of  the  Rockies 
and  other  mountains  in  search  of  botanical  specimens,  in 
the  collection  of  which  he  was  very  mtich  interested.  He 
took  one  of  these  trips  in  the  interest  of  the  Smithsonian 
Institution,  for  which  he  obtained  many  valuable  specimens. 
The  summer  of  1888  he  spent  in  traveling  with  his  family 
in  Great  Britain,  extending  his  journeys  to  the  Hebrides. 

He  had  suffered  from  hardening  of  the   arteries   since 


I870-I87I  329 

1914,  and  his  death  occurred  at  his  home  in  Montclair, 
October  24,  19 16.  He  was  buried  in  Rosedale  Cemetery 
in  that  city. 

Mr.  Spaulding  was  twice  married,  his  first  wife  being 
Florence  Alicia,  daughter  of  Chester  and  Ehzabeth  (Bull) 
Chapman  of  Ellington,VConn.  They  were  married  in  Rock- 
ville,  July  29,  1874,  and  had  three  children,  Raymond 
Chapman,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1897  and  of 
the  New  York  Law  School  in  1899;  Edith  Randall, 
who  died  November  5,  1900,  and  Clement,  whose 
death  occurred  January  6,  1881.  Mrs.  Spaulding  died 
July  4,  1889,  and  on  July  14,  1891,  Mr.  Spaulding's 
marriage  took  place  in  Hyde  Park,  Mass.,  to  Sarah  L., 
daughter  of  Samuel  Myrick  and  Isabelle  (Swords)  Norris. 
She  survives  him  with  his  son,  and  he  leaves  also  his 
brother,  Wayland  Spaulding  (B.A.  1874,  B.D.  1884). 


Frederick  Sidney  Chase,  B.A.   1871 

Born  December  31,  1849,  in  Lafayette,  Ind. 
Died  June  25,   1917,  in  Indianapolis,  Ind. 

Frederick  Sidney  Chase  was  born  in  Lafayette,  Ind., 
December  31,  1849,  his  parents  being  Hiram  Wilson  and 
Rebecca  Sophia  (Gridley)  Chase.  Through  his  father,  who 
was  the  son  of  Horizon  and  Anne  (Webb)  Chase,  he  traced 
his  descent  to  Aquila  Chase,  who  came  to  this  country 
from  Chesham,  England,  in  1639.  His  mother  was  the 
daughter  of  Newman  Gridley.  Her  maternal  ancestors 
were  early  settlers  of  Connecticut,  who  afterwards  removed 
to  the  vicinity  of  Utica,  N.  Y. 

He  received  his  preparatory  training  at  the  Lafayette  Col- 
legiate Institute,  entering  Yale  as  a  member  of  the  Class 
of  1870.  He  left  that  Class  in  Junior  year,  on  account  of 
a  breakdown  in  health,  but  returned  to  New  Haven  in  the 
fall  of  1870,  and  completed  his  course  the  following  June. 
His  Junior  appointment  was  a  Dissertation,  and  at  Com- 
mencement he  was  given  a  Philosophical  Oration.  He 
was  a  member  of  Phi  Beta  Kappa  and  Linonia,  and 
belonged  to  the  Class  Glee  Club  in  his  Senior  year. 

He  began  the  study  of  law  at  Columbia  University  after 
graduating  from  Yale,  and  in  1873  received  the  degree  of 


33°  YALE    COLLEGE 

LL.B.  from  that  institution.  He  then  returned  to  Indiana, 
was. admitted  to  the  bar,  and  entered  upon  the  practice  of 
law  at  Lafayette.  In  1875  he  became  associated  with  his 
father,  who  was  one  of  the  leading  lawyers  of  the  state, 
under  the  name  of  Chase  &  Chase.  After  the  death  of  his 
father  in  1889  he  was  for  some  years  a  member  of  the  firm 
of  Wallace,  Baird  &  Chase,  in  which  his  partners  were  W. 
DeWitt  Wallace  and  Samuel  P.  Baird.  His  business  had 
been  largely  confined  to  looking  after  trust  property  and 
interests  of  his  own  during  the  latter  part  of  his  life.  He 
was  a  member  of  the  Second  Presbyterian  Church  of 
Lafayette. 

His  death  occurred  in  Indianapolis,  Ind.,  June  25,  1917, 
as  the  result  of  heart  trouble.  He  suffered  a  paralytic 
stroke  several  years  ago,  and  since  1914  had  been  in  a 
sanitarium  in  that  city,  undergoing  treatment.  Interment 
was  in  Springvale  Cemetery  at  Lafayette. 

Mr.  Chase  was  married  March  20,  1877,  in  that  city,  to 
Annis  E.,  daughter  of  Moses  and  Eliza  (Hawkins)  Fowler. 
She  died  November  12,  1884.  Their  only  son,  Moses 
Fowler,  survives.    Mr.  Chase  also  leaves  a  sister. 


O'Hara  Darlington,  B.A.   1871 

Born  August  29,   1849,  at  Guyasuta,   Pa. 
Died  August  22,  1916,  at  Guyasuta,  Pa. 

O'Hara  Darlington,  son  of  William  McCullough  and 
Mary  Carson  (O'Hara)  Darlington,  was  born  August  29, 
1849,  ^t  Guyasuta,  Pa.,  the  family  estate.  This  property, 
situated  in  O'Hara  Township  in  Allegheny  County,  was 
purchased  from  the  state  in  1793  by  his  great-grandfather, 
James  O'Hara,  who  came  to  Philadelphia  from  Ireland  in 
1772  and  two  years  afterwards  settled  in  Pittsburgh;  he 
attained  a  notable  record  as  a  soldier,  serving  as  captain 
of  an  independent  company  of  Virginia  frontiersmen  at 
Kanawha  in  1777  and  as  quartermaster-general  of  the 
United  States  Army  from  1792  to  1796.  The  American 
branch  of  the  Darlington  family  was  founded  by  Abraham 
Darlington,  who  came  from  Darnhall,  Chester  County, 
England,  in  171 1,  and  settled  in  Chester  County,  Pa. 
O'Hara  Darlington's  father,  an  attorney  at  law  and  writer 
on  American  history,  was  the  son  of  Benjamin  and  Agnes 


1871  33^ 

(McCullough)  Darlington.  His  mother,  who  was  the 
daughter  of  Richard  Butler  and  Mary  Boyd  (Fitzsimmons) 
O'Hara,  continued  her  husband's  work  of  historical  research 
after  his  death. 

He  received  his  early  training  at  the  Sharpsburg  (Pa.) 
Academy,  and  also  attended  the  Western  University  of 
Pennsylvania  (University  of  Pittsburgh)  before  entering 
Yale  with  the  Class  of  1870.  Owing  to  ill  health,  he  with- 
drew from  college  in  Freshman  year,  but  returned  the 
following  fall  and  completed  his  course  in  1871.  He  was  a 
member  of  Brothers  in  Unity,  and  received  a  First  Col- 
loquy appointment  at  Commencement. 

Mr.  Darlington's  life  since  graduation  had  been  devoted 
mainly  to  the  study  of  history,  botany,  and  general  litera- 
ture, and  to  travel,  although  the  care  of  the  Darlington 
estate  had  absorbed  his  attention  to  quite  an  extent. 
Botany,  especially,  had  interested  him,  and  he  had  given 
much  time  to  research  and  experiments  in  that  direction. 
He  was  noted  for  his  remarkable  memory  and  great  knowl- 
edge of  history  and  literature.  The  family  library,  con- 
sisting of  the  books  collected  by  his  father  and  sorne 
additional  volumes  which  he  had  himself  gathered,  is 
regarded  as  one  of  the  finest  private  collections  in  the 
country.  Mr.  Darlington  was  a  Presbyterian  and  a  member 
of  the  Pennsylvania  Historical  Society. 

He  died  after  some  months  of  ill  health,  August  22,  1916, 
at  Guyasuta,  which  had  always  been  his  home,  and  was 
buried  in  the  Allegheny  Cemetery  at  Pittsburgh.  His 
death  resulted  from  a  severe  attack  of  heat  prostration, 
following  a  serious  illness  from  acute  indigestion  which 
occurred  earlier  in  the  year. 

Mr.  Darlington  had  never  married.  He  is  survived  by 
two  sisters.  A  second  cousin,  Norman  B.  Beecher,  gradu- 
ated from  the  College  in  1898,  receiving  an  LL.B.  at  Har- 
vard three  years  later. 


John  Kasson  Howe,  B.A.   1871 

Born  July  10,  1850,  in  Troy,  N.  Y. 
Died  March  4,  1917,  in  Albany,  N.  Y. 

John  Kasson  Howe  was  born  July   10,   1850,  in  Troy, 
N.  Y.,  being  a  descendant  of  John  Howe,  of  Warwickshire, 


33^  YALE    COLLEGE 

England,  who  came  to  Sudbury,  Mass.,  in  1638,  and  later 
was  the  first  settler  of  Marlboro,  Mass.  His  father,  James 
Henry  Howe,  was  the  son  of  James  and  Elizabeth  (Potter) 
Howe;  he  was  born  in  Lebanon,  N.  H.,  but  spent  most  of 
his  life  in  Troy,  engaged  in  business  as  a  merchant.  On 
the  maternal  side,  John  K.  Howe  was  of  Scotch-Irish 
descent,  and  according  to  family  records  his  ancestors, 
Adam  and  Jane  Hall  Kasson,  emigrated  from  Belfast  to 
Boston  in  1722.  His  mother  was  Honor  Maria,  daughter 
of  Adam  and  Nancy  (Blackman)  Kasson. 

Before  entering  Yale  in  1867,  he  studied  at  the  Troy 
Academy  and  at  the  Hopkins  Grammar  School,  New 
Haven.  He  was  given  First  Dispute  appointments  in  both 
Junior  and  Senior  years. 

Mr.  Howe  was  engaged  in  the  hardware  business  with 
his  father  in  Troy  for  some  years  after  graduation,  the 
name  of  the  firm  being  Howe  &  Company.  In  November, 
1883,  he  entered  the  Osgood  Dredge  Company  of  Albany, 
N.  Y.,  as  partner.  He  continued  to  make  his  home  in 
Troy  until  1891,  but  at  that  time  removed  to  Albany.  In 
April,  191 1,  the  Osgood  Dredge  Company  was  consolidated 
with  the  Marion  Shovel  &  Dredge  Company  of  Marion, 
Ohio,  and  the  manufacturing  part  of  the  business  was 
transferred  to  that  town.  Mr.  Howe,  who  was  at  the  time 
the  principal  owner  and  officer  in  the  first-named  company, 
remained  in  Albany  as  Eastern  representative  and  consult- 
ing engineer  of  the  firm,  and  was  active  in  the  life  of  that 
city  until  his  death.  The  Albany  Orphan  Asylum  had 
long  been  one  of  his  chief  interests.  He  was  chosen  a 
member  of  its  board  of  managers  in  1904  and  elected  presi- 
dent in  19 1 3.  Having  made  a  thorough  study  of  the  best 
methods  of  conducting  a  charity  of  this  sort,  he  was  the 
first  to  advocate  the  abandonment  of  the  old  asylum  and 
the  adoption  of  the  cottage  system.  Since  1903  he  had 
served  as  president  of  the  board  of  trustees  of  the  Second 
Presbyterian  Church.  He  was  a  member  of  a  number  of 
social  organizations,  being  a  founder  of  the  local  Uni- 
versity Club,  and  was  a  director  of  the  First  National  Bank. 
He  was  especially  active  as  an  alumnus  of  Yale,  and  had 
been  a  member  of  the  Alumni  Advisory  Board  since  its 
organization  in  1906.  As  an  evidence  of  the  appreciation 
of  this  service  to  the  University,  the  Yale  Alumni  Associa- 
tion of  Northeastern  New  York,  has  established  a  Howe 


J 


I 


1871  333 

memorial  fund  with  which  to  educate  local  boys  at  Yale. 
Mr.  Howe  was  a  member  of  the  Citizen  Corps  of  Troy, 
N.  Y.,  and  served  his  full  time  in  the  National  Guard.  He 
spent  five  months  in  Europe  in  1882. 

He  died,  after  a  brief  illness  of  angina  pectoris,  at  his 
home  in  Albany,  March  4,  19 17.  Interment  was  in  the 
Holland  lot  in  the  Springfield  (Mass.)  Cemetery. 

He  was  married  December  7,  1881,  in  New  York  City, 
to  Annie  E.,  daughter  of  Josiah  Gilbert  and  Elizabeth 
(Chapin)  Holland,  formerly  of  Springfield,  Mass.,  but  then 
living  in  New  York,  where  Mr.  Holland  went  to  establish 
and  edit  Scribner's  Monthly,  now  called  the  Century  Maga- 
:^ine.  She  survives  him  with  their  daughter,  Alison,  and 
he  also  leaves  a  nephew,  the  only  child  of  his  brother,  the 
late  Allen  Brewer  Howe  (Ph.B.  1874,  Ph.D.  Strassburg 
1879). 

George  Cheever  Jewell,  B.A.   1871 

Born  May  19,  1844,  in  New  York  City 
Died  November  10,  1916,  in  Tabor,  Iowa 

George  Cheever  Jewell  was  the  son  of  Leander  Jewell, 
a  printer,  and  Mary  Ann  (Corwith)  Jewell,  and  the  grand- 
son of  Ebenezer  Jewell,  who  fought  in  the  War  of  1812, 
and  Anna  (Jones)  Jewell.  He  was  born  May  19,  1844,  in 
New  York  City,  being  a  descendant  of  Thomas  Jewell,  who 
came  to  Hingham,  Mass.,  from  England  about  1655. 
Leander  Jewell  died  in  1847,  and  nine  years  afterwards  his 
wife  married  Simeon  P.  Bradford.  On  the  maternal  side, 
George  C.  Jewell  was  of  Huguenot  origin,  his  mother's 
ancestors  having  come  from  France  early  in  the  eighteenth 
century.    They  settled  at  Bridgehampton,  Long  Island. 

His  boyhood  was  spent  in  western  New  York  State,  in  the 
vicinity  of  Seneca  Lake,  and  there  he  attended  the  district 
schools,  when  possible.  His  preparation  for  college  was 
received  at  the  Cooperstown  (N.  Y.)  Seminary  and  at 
Willi ston  Seminary,  Easthampton,  Mass.  He  began  the 
study  of  theology  at  Yale  in  the  fall  after  receiving  his 
bachelor's  degree,  spending  a  year  in  New  Haven.  From 
1872  to  1874  he  was  at  Auburn  Theological  Seminary, 
and  during  his  summer  vacations  preached  at  Bridgewater, 
Vt,  and  DeRuyter,  N.  Y.     He  was  ordained  to  the  Pres- 


334  YALE    COLLEGE 

byterian  ministry  in  the  October  following  his  graduation 
from  the  seminary,  and  soon  became  pastor  of  a  church 
of  that  denomination  at  Parma  Center,  N.  Y.,  where  he 
remained  for  three  years.  In  May,  1878,  he  was  settled 
over  the  Congregational  churches  at  Ellington  and  Clear 
Creek,  N.  Y.  His  next  charge  was  at  Sand  Bank,  N.  Y. 
He  was  then  pastor  at  Black  Creek,  N.  Y.,  from  1882  to 
1885 ;  at  Cortland,  Ohio,  for  the  next  three  years ;  at  Say- 
brook,  Ohio,  from  1885  to  1892;  at  Lewis,  Iowa,  from  1892 
to  1898;  of  Pilgrim  Church,  Creston,  Iowa,  from  1898  to 
1901 ;  at  Kellogg,  Iowa,  from  1901  to  1903,  and  at  Chester, 
Iowa,  from  1903  to  1907.  While  pastor  of  the  Cortland 
Congregational  Church,  he  supplied  the  Hartford  Congre- 
gational Church,  and  during  his  pastorate  in  Saybrook  he 
preached  occasionally  in  Cleveland.  In  April,  1907,  he 
retired  from  the  active  work  of  the  ministry  on  account 
of  his  wife's  health,  and  after  spending  over  a  year  in 
Iowa  City,  where  his  younger  daughter  was  engaged 
in  post-graduate  work  at  the  university,  removed  to 
Tabor,  Iowa,  which  was  thereafter  his  home  and  where 
he  died  very  suddenly,  from  heart  failure,  November  10, 
1916.  Burial  was  in  the  Tabor  Cemetery.  During  his 
residence  in  Tabor  he  was  active  in  church  work,  serving 
occasionally  in  a  ministerial  capacity.  He  continued  his 
studies  in  Greek  and  Hebrew  almost  until  the  last. 

Mr.  Jewell  was  married  September  17,  1874,  in  DeRuyter, 
N.  Y.,  to  Susan  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  Dr.  David  Wilder 
and  Elizabeth  Ann  (Williams)  Wilder.  She  survives  him 
with  two  daughters,  Frances  Angeline  (B.A.  Tabor  1903, 
M.A.  State  University  of  Iowa  1909)  and  Susan  Grace 
(B.A.  Tabor  1904,  M.S.  State  University  of  Iowa  1908), 
now  a  professor  at  Tabor. 


Herbert  Evelyn  Kinney,  B.A.   1871 

Born  March  28,  1847,  in  Griswold,  Conn. 
Died  August  24,  1916,  in  Griswold,  Conn. 

Herbert  Evelyn  Kinney  was  born  in  Griswold,  Conn., 
March  28,  1847,  his  parents  being  Archibald  Crary  Kinney, 
a  teacher  and  farmer,  and  Emily  (Boardman)  Kinney. 
He  was  descended  from  Henry  Kinne,  who  was  born  in 


N 


1871  335 

1624,  probably  in  Holland,  of  Puritan  parentage,  and  came 
to  Salem,  Mass.,  his  death  occurring  there  in  1712.  Two 
of  his  grandsons,  Thomas  and  Joseph  Kinne,  removed  to 
Connectictit,  and  purchased  adjoining  farms  on  the  south 
bank  of  the  Pachaug  River  in  Preston,  near  Griswold. 
Archibald  C.  Kinne  was  the  son  of  Sterry  and  Sally  (Rob- 
bins)  Kinney,  and  the  grandson  of  Samuel  Robbins,  a  cap- 
tain in  the  Revolution.  His  wife  was  the  daughter  of 
John  and  Abby  (Cook)  Boardman.  She  traced  her  ancestry 
to  the  Boardman  family  of  Ipswich,  Mass.,  the  founders 
of  which  were  Thomas  and  Samuel  Boreman,  early  settlers 
in  the  town,  who  had  come  to  America  from  Claydon,  Eng- 
land ;  Samuel  Boreman  later  settled  in  Wethersfield,  Conn. 
John  Wait  Boardman,  born  in  Topsfield,  Mass.,  in  1676, 
married  Mary  Billings  of  Preston,  Conn.,  who  was  a  sister 
of  Rev.  William  Billings,  a  graduate  of  Yale  in  1720. 
Through  her  grandmother,  Jemima  M.  Boardman,  whose 
father  was  Capt.  Ezra  Kinne,  Mrs.  Archibald  C.  Kinney 
was  also  a  descendant  of  Henry  Kinne  of  Salem.  Other 
ancestors  of  her  son  were  Capt.  Thaddeus  Cook,  Col.  David 
Boardman,  and  Rev.  Aaron  Kinne  (B.A.  1765).  William 
Kinne,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1848,  was  a  distant 
cousin. 

His  preparatory  training  was  received  at  the  Norwich 
(Conn.)  Free  Academy.  He  was  given  a  first  prize  in 
English  composition  in  Sophomore  year  and  a  second  prize 
in  that  subject  in  1871,  receiving  also  in  Sophomore  year 
a  second  prize  in  the  Brothers  Prize  Debate  and  the  Modern 
Language  Scholarship.  He  ranked  first  in  the  Class  in 
Junior  year  and  second  at  Commencement,  his  appointments 
being  Philosophical  Orations.  He  was  a  member  of 
Brothers  in  Unity  and  Phi  Beta  Kappa. 

After  being  engaged  in  private  tutoring  in  New  Haven 
for  a  year,  during  which  he  also  studied  in  the  Yale  Gradu- 
ate School,  Mr.  Kinney  began  the  study  of  law  at  Columbia 
University,  where  he  received  the  degree  of  LL.B.  in  1874. 
He  was  admitted  to  the  New  York  Bar  in  October,  1874, 
and  for  the  next  three  years  served  as  managing  clerk 
in  the  office  of  Betts,  Atterbury  &  Betts  in  New  York  City. 
He  then  practiced  independently  until  1882,  when  he 
became  a  member  of  the  legal  staff  of  the  West  Shore 
Railroad  Company,  and  he  afterwards  served,  until  his 
resignation  in   1905,  in  a  similar  capacity  with  the   New 


33^  YALE    COLLEGE 

York  Central  &  Hudson  River  Railroad  Company.  While 
thus  engaged,  he  became  especially  conversant  with  real 
estate  and  admiralty  law,  and  had  charge  of  much  impor- 
tant litigation.  He  served  as  consulting  attorney  in  con- 
nection with  the  constitutional  questions  relative  to  the 
United  Engineering  Building,  for  which  Mr.  Carnegie 
offered  a  gift  of  one  million  dollars,  on  condition  that  all 
the  societies  of  engineers  be  united  in  one  building.  He 
was  a  director  in  the  Wallkill  Valley  Railroad,  the  Mahopac 
Falls  Railroad  Company,  and  the  Rome,  Watertown  & 
Ogdensburg  Railroad.  When  the  consolidation  of  the  New 
York  Central  and  West  Shore  railroads  took  place,  Mr. 
Kinney,  ranking  next  to  Judge  Ashbel  Green  in  the  Law 
Department,  had  special  charge  of  the  real  estate  branch 
of  the  transaction.  Afterwards  suffering  a  nervous  break- 
down, he  spent  a  summer  in  England  recuperating.  The 
condition  of  his  health  later  compelled  his  complete  retire- 
ment, and  he  settled  on  the  ancestral  farm  at  Griswold, 
where  he  remained  during  the  rest  of  his  life,  giving  his 
time  to  farming  and  study  as  his  health  permitted.  He 
still  retained  his  aptitude  for  languages,  and  his  chief  work 
in  recent  years  was  translating  stories  from  German  into 
English,  and  the  study  of  Japanese.  He  was  deeply  inter- 
ested in  sociology,  and  had  contributed  to  the  press  numer- 
ous articles  on  various  phases  of  the  subject.  Mr.  Kinney 
was  not  a  church  member,  but  attended  the  Episcopal 
Church,  his  wife  being  for  many  years  a  member  of  Christ 
Church,  New  York  City.  He  had  served  as  secretary  of 
the  Kinne  Historical  and  Genealogical  Society,  incorporated 
in  1884. 

His  death  occurred  at  his  home,  August  24,  1916,  as  the 
result  of  acute  indigestion,  apparently  caused  by  heat  pros- 
tration. Interment  was  in  the  "Kinne  Burying  Ground" 
in  the  town  of  Griswold. 

He  was  married  June  4,  1890,  in  New  York  City,  to 
Charlotte  Emily,  daughter  of  Nelson  and  Emily  (Jones) 
Clements,  and  a  descendant  of  Brig.-Gen.  James  Chambers 
of  the  Revolutionary  Army,  whose  daughter,  Charlotte 
Chambers,  founded  the  Cincinnati  chapter  of  the  Artierican 
Bible  Society  in  181 5.  They  had  one  son,  Evelyn  Clements, 
who,  with  his  mother,  survives.  Mr.  Kinney  also  leaves 
two  sisters. 


1871  337 


Lyne  Starling,  B.A.   187 1 

Born  August  23,  1848,  in  Frankfort,  Ky. 
Died  October  4,  1916,  in  Greenville,  Miss. 

Lyne  Starling  was  born  August  23,  1848,  in  Frankfort, 
Ky.,  the  son  of  Lyne  Starling,  a  lawyer,  merchant,  and 
planter,  who  served  as  colonel  and  chief  of  General  Crit- 
tenden's staff  during  the  Civil  War,  and  who  was  the  son 
of  William  and  Mary  (McDowell)  Starling.  The  Starlings 
were  London  merchants,  who  emigrated  about  1740  to  Vir- 
ginia, where  they  became  large  owners  of  tobacco  lands. 
Ephraim  McDowell,  the  pioneer  member  of  his  family  in 
this  country,  received  a  large  grant  of  land  in  Rockbridge 
County,  Va.,  before  1735.  His  son,  John,  as  captain  of 
the  militia  of  his  county,  was  killed  in  ambush  while  pur- 
suing Indians,  and  his  grandson,  Samuel  McDowell,  par- 
ticipated in  the  French  and  Indian  War  of  1757  and  in 
the  Revolution,  and  afterwards  removed  to  Kentucky, 
where  he  presided  at  the  ten  conventions  held  prior  to 
Kentucky's  admission  to  the  Union,  and  was  the  first  United 
States  judge  of  the  state.  Many  members  of  the  McDowell 
family  fought  in  the  Civil  War,  the  majority  of  them  being 
in  the  Union  Army.  Lyne  Starling's  mother  was  Maria 
Antoinette,  daughter  of  Benjamin  and  Prudence  (Culbert- 
son)  Hensley,  the  latter's  parents  being  Alexander  and 
Janet  (Lindsay)  Culbertson.  She  was  descended  from  Dr. 
William  Hensley  and  his  wife,  Mary  Delaney  Hensley,  of 
Culpeper  County,  Va. 

Lyne  Starling  entered  Yale  from  Frankfort,  where  he 
had  received  his  preparatory  training  at  B.  B.  Sayre's 
School.  He  was  president  of  the  Class  Baseball  Team  for 
two  years  and  a  member  of  the  Wooden  Spoon  Committee. 

In  1872  he  established  himself  on  a  cotton  plantation  at 
Sunnyside,  Ark.,  where  he  remained  for  ten  years.  He 
removed  to  Greenville,  Miss.,  in  the  spring  of  1882,  and 
until  1886  was  engaged  in  business  as  a  banker.  He  then 
entered  the  cotton  business,  but  only  continued  his  activities 
in  that  direction  for  about  four  years.  For  some  years 
he  was  connected  with  a  St.  Louis  and  New  Orleans  steam- 
boat line,  always  making  his  home  in  Greenville.  He  was 
for  eight  years  secretary  of  the  Mississippi  Levee  Board, 
of  which  his  brother,  W^illiam  Starling,  was  chief  engineer. 


33^  YALE    COLLEGE 

He  served  on  the  City  Council  of  Greenville  from  1895  to 
1907  and  as  city  clerk  for  eight  years.  He  was  a  member 
of  the  First  Presbyterian  Church  of  Greenville.  He  died 
at  his  home  in  that  town,  October  4,  1916,  following  an 
illness  of  more  than  a  year  due  to  neuritis.  Burial  was  in 
Greenville. 

Mr.  Starling  was  married  October  i,  1872,  in  Frankfort, 
to  a  distant  cousin,  Kate  Crittenden,  daughter  of  Henry 
and  Elizabeth  Ann  (Todd)  Watson.  Mrs.  Starling  died 
March  24,  1917.  Four  children  were  born  to  them:  Henry 
Watson,  who  graduated  from  Centre  College  (now  known 
as  the  Central  University  of  Kentucky)  in  1896;  Lyne,  a 
graduate  of  that  institution  in  1897;  Katharine  Innes  (Mrs. 
Hugh  Agnew  Gamble),  and  Maria  Hensley,  the  wife  of 
William  McClintoch  Reid.  In  addition  to  his  children,  all 
of  whom  live  in  Greenville,  Mr.  Starling  is  survived  by 
five  grandchildren,  two  sisters,  and  a  brother,  the  latter 
being  Charles  Hensley  Starling,  also  a  member  of  the 
Class  of  1871.  Starling  W.  Childs  (B.A.  1891)  is  a 
relative. 

Some  time  before  his  death,  Mr.  Starling,  with  his  two 
sisters  and  brother,  presented  to  the  Greenville  Public 
Library  the  collection  of  books  owned  by  the  late  Wil- 
liam Starling  and  consisting  of  twenty-six  hundred  vol- 
umes. Because  of  the  interest  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lyne  darling 
felt  in  the  education  of  worthy  young  men  and  women, 
their  children  have  given,  as  a  memorial  to  them,  one 
thousand  dollars  to  a  group  of  schools  owned  by  the  Synod 
of  the  Presbyterian  Church  of  Mississippi,  this  amount 
to  be  placed  in  trust  and  the  interest  vised  for  a  perpetual 
scholarship  which  is  named  for  them. 


Hiram  Sterling  Pomeroy,  B.A.   1872 

Born  January  22,  1848,  in  Somers,  Conn. 
Died  April  20,   1917,   in  Auburndale,   Mass. 

Hiram  Sterling  Pomeroy  was  born  in  Somers,  Conn., 
January  22,  1848,  being  the  youngest  of  the  twelve  children 
of  Oren  Pomeroy,  a  farmer  and  manufacturer  of  that  town, 
where  the  family  had  lived  for  several  generations.  Oren 
Pomeroy,  who  served  at  one  time  as  a  colonel  on  the  staff  of 


1871-1872  339 

the  governor  of  Connecticut,  was  the  son  of  Hiram  and 
Ruby  Pomeroy  (Parsons)  Pomeroy.  He  was  a  descendant 
of  Eltweed  Pomeroy,  who,  in  1630,  came  from  Beaminster, 
England;  in  October,  1633,  became  chairman  of  the  first 
town  government  estabhshed  in  any  of  the  New  England 
colonies,  and  was  engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  fire  arms, 
as  was  a  long  line  of  his  descendants,  including  Seth  Pom- 
eroy, an  officer  in  the  French  and  Indian  Wars,  who  was  the 
first  brigadier-general  commissioned  by  the  United  States 
Congress.  The  latter's  sons,  Seth  and  Medad,  graduated 
from  Yale  in  1753  and  1757,  respectively;  the  elder  son 
married  Sarah,  daughter  of  Gov.  Jonathan  Law,  Harvard 
1695,  and  a  sister  of  Richard  Law  (B.A.  175 1,  LL.D.  1802), 
a  member  of  the  Continental  Congress,  and  of  John  Law 
(B.A.  1753).  Other  members  of  the  Pomeroy  family  who 
had  received  degrees  from  Yale  were  Samuel  Pomeroy 
(B.A.  1705)  ;  Benjamin  Pomeroy  (B.A.  1733),  who 
married  a  sister  of  Eleazer  Wheelock  (B.A.  1733),  the 
founder  and  the  first  president  of  Dartmouth  College,  and 
was  himself  actively  interested  in  the  establishment  of  that 
institution,  of  which  he  was  one  of  the  original  trustees 
and  where  he  received  the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Divinity  in 
1774;  the  latter's  son,  Josiah  Pomeroy,  who  graduated 
from  the  College  in  1770;  Josiah  Pomeroy  (B.A.  1762), 
and  Rev.  Jonathan  Law  Pomeroy  (Honorary  M.A.  1801). 
H.  Sterling  Pomeroy's  mother,  a  second  cousin  of  her 
husband,  was  Lucinda,  daughter  of  Capt.  Samuel  Pomeroy 
and  Catharine  (Day)  Pomeroy,  and  granddaughter  of 
Joshua  and  Mary  (Davis)  Pomeroy.    . 

He  prepared  for  college  at  the  Monson  (Mass.)  Acad- 
emy, and  under  a  private  tutor,  and  entered  Yale  with  the 
Class  of  1872.  Ill  health  obliged  him  to  withdraw  at  the 
end  of  Freshman  year.  His  condition  later  improved,  and 
for  some  years,  with  an  interval  of  study  in  the  Yale 
School  of  Medicine  in  1870,  he  was  engaged  in  business 
as  superintendent  of  the  Blake  Brothers  Hardware  Manu- 
facturing Company  at  Westville,  Conn.  During  this  period 
he  made  several  inventions,  for  which  he  obtained  patents. 
Yale  gave  him  an  honorary  M.A.  in  1891,  and  he  had 
since  been  enrolled  with  his  original  Class. 

About  1880  he  went  abroad  and  studied  in  the  Universi- 
ties of  Leipsic  and  Prague,  graduating  with  high  standing 
from   Leipsic  with  the  degree   of   M.D.   in   1885.     While 


340  YALE    COLLEGE 

studying  in  Austria,  he  was  connected  with  the  work  of 
the  American  Board  and  estabUshed  an  EngUsh  Protestant 
Sunday  School  in  Prague,  the  first  known  there.  In  1886 
Dr.  Pomeroy  returned  with  his  family  to  America,  and 
settled  in  Boston,  where  he  practiced  until  his  death.  Of 
late  years  he  had  devoted  himself  to  nervous  cases  and  to 
the  cure  of  inebriates  and  drug  victims.  He  was  vice- 
president  of  the  Health  Educational  League  of  Boston, 
and  the  author  of  "Ethics  and  Marriage"  (1888),  "Is 
Man  Too  Prolific"  (1891),  and  "The  Boy  and  the  Cigar- 
ette" (1906).  P^or  many  years  he  was  a  member  of  the 
Central  Congregational  Church  of  Boston,  being  a  deacon 
and  superintendent  of  the  Sunday  School.  In  1908  he 
removed  to  Auburndale,  a  suburb  of  Boston,  but  continued 
his  practice  in  the  city.  He  became  a  member  of  the 
Auburndale  Congregational  Church,  was  a  deacon  for  five 
years,  and  at  the  time  of  his  death  a  member  of  the  church 
committee.  For  twenty-seven  years  he  was  a  member  of 
the  Boston  Congregational  Club,  and  he  also  belonged  to 
the  Suffolk  branch  of  the  Massachusetts  Medical  Society, 
the  Boston  Medical  Library  Association,  the  League  to 
Enforce  Peace,  and  the  Society  of  Colonial  Families.  He 
had  aided  in  gathering  material  for  a  genealogy  of  the 
Pomeroy  family,  and  was  president  of  the  Pomeroy  Family 
Association. 

He  died  suddenly  at  his  home  in  Auburndale,  April  20, 
1917.  While  he  had  been  ill  for  some  time  with  the  grippe 
and  angina  pectoris,  his  death  was  unexpected.  He  was 
buried  in  the  North  Cemetery  in  his  native  town. 

Dr.  Pomeroy  was  married  in  New  Haven,  Conn.,  October 
2,  1872,  to  Elizabeth  Fay,  daughter  of  John  Adams  and 
Sarah  (Hotchkiss)  Blake.  She  died  December  24,  1875, 
and  on  October  28,  1882,  he  married  in  Prague,  Austria, 
Mary  Eleanor,  daughter  of  Rev.  Daniel  Shepardson  and 
Eliza  (Smart)  Shepardson.  Dr.  Shepardson  was  the 
founder  of  Shepardson  College,  the  women's  department 
of  Denison  University;  he  studied  at  Brown  for  several 
years,  receiving  an  honorary  M.A.  from  that  institution 
in  1856,  ten  years  after  Granville  University  had  conferred 
a  similar  degree  upon  him,  and  the  degree  of  D.D.  from 
the  University  of  Lewisburg  in  1872.  Mrs.  Pomeroy,  who 
w^-s  a  sister  of  Francis  Wayland  Shepardson  (B.A.  Deni- 
son 1882  and  Brown  1883,  Ph.D.  Yale  1892)  and  Daniel 
Shepardson   (B.A.  Denison  1888,  Ph.D.  Yale  1891),  died 


1872-1873  341 

March  10,  191 1,  and  on  November  2y,  1912,  Dr.  Pomeroy 
was  married  in  New  Haven,  to  Sara  Blake,  daughter  of 
AVilHam  Woodruff  Stone  (B.A.  1854)  and  Sarah  Carina 
(Blake)  Stone,  and  a  niece  of  his  first  wife.  She  survives 
him,  and  he  also  leaves  four  children  by  his  second  mar- 
riage. Faith,  who  graduated  from  Denison  University  with 
the  degree  of  B.S.  in  1904  and  was  married  three  years  later 
to  George  Anthony  Hall  (B.S.  Massachusetts  Institute  of 
Technology  1901,  B.D.  Yale  1909,  M.A.  Harvard  1910)  ; 
Kenneth,  who  attended  Mount  Hermon  and  has  been  in 
business  in  Boston  for  the  past  ten  years ;  Norman,  a 
student  at  Denison  University,  and  Dorothy,  who  is  a  special 
student  at  Shepardson  College,  and  five  grandchildren. 
Two  children  by  this  marriage,  Eric  Shepardson  and 
Gladys,  died  in  1893  and  1895,  respectively.  Several  of' 
Dr.  Pomeroy's  sisters  attended  Mount  Holyoke  College, 
and  a  brother,  Oren  Day  Pomeroy,  received  the  degree  of 
M.D.  from  Columbia  in  i860.  He  was  a  great-uncle  of 
Rev.  Henry  Burnham  Kirkland  (B.D.  1912). 


William  Beebe,  B.A.   1873 

Born   September  4,    1851,   in  Litchfield,   Conn. 
Died  March   11,   1917,   in  New  Haven,   Conn. 

William  Beebe  was  born  September  4,  1851,  in  Litchfield, 
Conn.,  the  son  of  Philip  Schuyler  and  Lucy  Beebe  (Rob- 
bins)  Beebe.  Plis  father,  whose  parents  were  William  and 
Clarissa  (Sanford)  Beebe,  was  descended  from  John  Beebe, 
who  came  to  this  country  from  England  in  May,  1650,  and 
settled  in  Hadley,  Mass.  His  great-grandfather,  Bezaliel 
Beebe,  a  colonel  in  the  Revolution,  also  fought  in  the  French 
and  Indian  Wars.  His  mother,  likewise  a  descendant  of 
John  Beebe,  was  the  daughter  of  Samuel  and  Luce  (Beebe) 
Robbins. 

He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  the  Litchfield  Select  Academy. 
He  was  awarded  first  and  second  prizes  in  English  com- 
position in  vSophomore  year,  a  second  prize  at  Junior  Exhi- 
bition, and  a  Townsend  premium  and  a  first  prize  in  English 
composition  Senior  year.  His  appointments  were  Philo- 
sophical Orations,  and  he  ranked  third  in  the  Class  at 
graduation.     He  was  a  member  of  Phi  Beta  Kappa,  and 


342  YALE    COLLEGE 

served  on  the  editorial  board  of  the  Yale  Literary  Magazine 
in  1872-73. 

He  taught  for  three  months  in  the  autumn  of  1873  in 
the  Hartford  (Conn.)  PubHc  High  School,  but  was  then 
compelled  by  an  attack  of  inflammatory  rheumatism  to  give 
up  his  position.  In  1874  he  began  work  in  mathematics 
and  astronomy  in  the  Yale  Graduate  School,  continuing 
his  studies  in  that  department  until  1879.  He  had  been  a 
member  of  the  Yale  Faculty  since  1876,  when  he  received 
an  appointment  as  a  tutor.  Six  years  later  he  was  promoted 
to  be  assistant  professor  of  mathematics,  and  in  1898  was 
raised  to  a  full  professorship.  He  had  also  served  as 
instructor  and  professor  of  astronomy.  Since  the  fall  of 
191 5  he  had  been  a  member  of  the  University  Council. 
Professor  Beebe  had  written  a  number  of  articles  on  comet- 
ary  orbits  for  German  periodicals.  In.  1882,  in  conjunc- 
tion with  the  late  Professor  Andrew  Wheeler  Phillips 
(Ph.B.  1873,  Honorary  M.A.  Trinity  1875,  Ph.D.  Yale 
1877),  he  published  "Graphic  Algebra,"  and  a  few  years 
ago  completed  a  work  on  analytical  geometry.  He  belonged 
to  the  American  Mathematical  Society.  Yale  conferred 
the  honorary  degree  of  Master  of  Arts  upon  him  in  1899. 

Professor  Beebe  had  for  some  years  been  actively  inter- 
ested as  a  trustee  in  the  George  Junior  Republic  at  Litch- 
field, and  of  late  he  had  given  generously  of  his  time  and 
energy  to  the  work  of  the  American  Red  Cross  and  had 
served  on  the  Serbian  Relief  Committee.  He  was  a  bene- 
factor of  the  Gaylord  Farm  Sanatorium  at  Wallingford, 
Conn.,  of  which  he  was  a  director  and,  for  some  years, 
financial  agent.  A  few  years  ago  he  and  Mrs.  Beebe  gave 
to  this  institution  an  open  air  pavilion  in  memory  of  their 
son.  Professor  Beebe  was  a  member  of  the  Protestant 
Episcopal  Church,  being  a  vestryman  of  Trinity  Church, 
New  Haven.     He  had  taken  a  number  of  trips  abroad. 

He  died  March  11,  1917,  at  his  home  in  New  Haven, 
after  a  brief  illness  from  double  pneumonia.  His  body 
was  taken  to  Litchfield  for  burial  in  the  West  Cemetery. 

He  was  married  June  22,  1880,  in  Wilmington,  Del.,  to 
Elizabeth,  daughter  of  Col.  George  Lea  Febiger,  U.  S.  A., 
and  Caroline  (Smith)  Febiger.  They  had  one  son,  Philip 
►Schuyler,  2d,  a  non-graduate  member  of  the  Sheffield  Class 
of  1905,  who  died  May  20,  1908.  Professor  Beebe,  who 
was  the  last  of  his  name  and  family,  is  survived  by  his 
wife. 


I 
I 


1873  343 


Frederick  Sheldon  Parker,  B.A.   1873 

Born  July  26,  1852,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died   September  9,   1916,  in  Brooklyn,  N.  Y, 

Frederick  Sheldon  Parker  was  born  July  26,  1852,  in 
New  Haven,  Conn.,  where  his  ancestor,  Edward  Parker, 
an  English  Puritan,  settled  in  1644,  soon  after  the  founding 
of  the  colony.  His  father,  Frederick  Sheldon  Parker,  was 
a  paper  manufacturer  of  that  city,  and  the  son  of  Dr. 
Joseph  Parker,  a  physician  of  Litchfield,  Conn.,  who  served 
as  a  surgeon  in  the  Revolutionary  Army,  and  Lydia  (Har- 
rison) Parker.  His  mother  was  Martha,  daughter  of 
William  and  Frances  (Longyear)  Newton  of  Albany, 
N.  Y.,  and  a  descendant  of  Thomas  Newton,  who  settled 
in  Fairfield,  Conn.,  in  1639,  and  of  Gov.  William  Bradford 
of  Plymouth  Colony. 

He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  Hopkins  Grammar  School,  and 
for  two  years  of  his  college  course  was  a  member  of  his 
Class  Glee  Club.  He  received  First  Colloquy  appointments, 
and  served  on  the  Senior  Promenade  and  Class  Supper 
committees. 

After  graduating  he  remained  at  Yale  for  a  year  to  take 
a  post-graduate  course  in  history,  at  the  conclusion  of 
which  he  entered  the  Columbia  Law  School,  where  he 
received  his  LL.B.  in  1876.  From  November,  1875,  until 
1878  he  was  in  the  office  of  Blatchford,  Seward,  Griswold 
&  DaCosta  of  New  York  City,  being  for  a  year  their 
managing  clerk.  In  1878  he  entered  the  office  of  the  United 
States  district  attorney  in  that  city,  where  he  remained 
for  two  years,  during  part  of  which  he  served  as  an  assist- 
ant district  attorney.  In  1880  he  formed  a  partnership 
with  Alfred  Taylor  (B.S.  Lewisburg  1866,  LL.B.  Columbia 
1871).  On  the  death  of  Mr.  Taylor  in  1894  the  name  of 
the  firm  was  changed  from  Taylor  &  Parker  to  Parker  & 
Aaron,  Mr.  Herman  Aaron  (B.S.  College  of  the  City  of 
New  York  1881,  LL.B.  Columbia  1883),  who  had  also  been 
in  the  former  firm,  becoming  Mr.  Parker's  junior  partner. 
Mr.  Parker  continued  in  the  active  practice  of  his  profes- 
sion, giving  his  attention  principally  to  corporation  law, 
until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  Brooklyn,  N.  Y.,  Sep- 
tember 9,  1916,  from  oedema  of  the  lungs,  following  an 
operation  for  appendicitis.  Interment  was  in  Greenwood 
Cemetery,  Brooklyn. 


344  YALE    COLLEGE 

Throughout  his  Hfe,  one  of  Mr.  Parker's  chief  interests 
was  in  collecting  Napoleona.  He  made  many  trips  to 
Europe,  during  which  he  gathered  much  material,  and  his 
collection  eventually  came  to  be  considered  one  of  the 
largest  and  best  in  the  country.  This  he  bequeathed  in  his 
will  to  Yale  University.  He  wrote  and  edited  much  on 
the  subject  of  Napoleona,  and  had  become  a  recognized 
authority.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Society  of  Mayflower 
Descendants,  the  Society  of  Colonial  Wars,  the  Sons  of  the 
Revolution,  and  the  Society  of  Founders  and  Patriots. 
For  many  years  he  served  as  a  vestryman  of  Grace  Church, 
Brooklyn.  He  was  Secretary  of  the  Class  of  1873  for 
three  years  after  graduation. 

On  May  16,  1876,  he  was  married  in  Brooklyn,  to  Jose- 
phine Mason,  daughter  of  John  J.  and  Mary  M.  Hill.  Her 
death  occurred  February '18,  1879.  They  had  one  son, 
Frederick  Sheldon,  Jr.,  who  died  at  birth,  February  6, 
1879.  Mr.  Parker  leaves  his  brother,  William  Newton 
Parker,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1879.  His  brother- 
in-law,  Simeon  Baldwin  Chittenden,  received  his  B.A.  from 
Yale  in  1865,  and  the  latter's  son,  Simeon  B.  Chittenden, 
Jr.,  is  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1902.  Another  nephew, 
John  Hill  Morgan,  graduated  from  the  College  in  1893 
and  from  the  School  of  Law  in  1896. 


Daniel  Robinson  Howe,  B.A.   1874 

Born  May  6,  1851,  in  Hartford,  Conn. 
Died  May  13,  1917,  in  Hartford,  Conn. 

Daniel  Robinson  Howe,  son  of  Edmund  G.  and  Frances 
(Kies)  Howe,  was  born  May  6,  1851,  in  Hartford,  Conn., 
where  his  father  was  for  a  long  time  engaged  in  business 
as  a  banker.  He  was  fitted  for  college  at  the  Hartford 
Public  High  School,  and  in  his  Senior  year  at  Yale  served 
on  the  Presentation  Day  Committee. 

He  had  been  engaged  in  business  in  Hartford  since  grad- 
uation. In  1874  he  entered  the  employ  of  Collins,  Fenn 
&  Company,  a  wholesale  dry  goods  house,  some  years  later 
becoming  a  clerk  and  bookkeeper  in  the  Hartford  National 
Bank.  From  1881  to  1895  he  was  a  member  of  the  banking 
firm  of  Howe  &  Collins,  his  partner  being  his  brother-in- 


1873-1874  345 

law,  Atwood  Collins  (B.A.  1873),  and  he  was  afterwards 
engaged  in  business  as  a  broker. 

Mr.  Howe  was  for  a  long  time  a  director  of  the  National 
Exchange  Bank,  senior  director  of  the  Connecticut  Trust 
&  Safe  Deposit  Company  and  of  the  Collins  Company,  and 
second  in  service  on  the  board  of  the  Connecticut  Fire 
Insurance  Company,  A  number  of  years  ago  he  served 
as  treasurer  of  the  Hartford  Street  Railway  Company,  and 
he  was  a  former  vice-president  of  the  Society  for  Savings. 
He  had  been  for  some  time  a  deacon  of  the  First  Church 
of  Christ  in  Hartford  (Center  Church),  and  was  closely 
identified  with  many  philanthropic  organizations.  For 
many  years  he  served  as  president  of  the  Young  Men's 
Christian  Association,  and  at  his  death  was  a  member  of 
its  board  of  trustees.  He  was  also  vice-chairman  of  the 
State  Y.  M.  C.  A.,  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Warbur- 
ton  Chapel,  a  member  of  the  advisory  board  of  the  Hart- 
ford Orphan  Asylum  and  of  the  executive  committee  of 
the  Hartford  Federation  of  Churches,  a  trustee  of  the 
Watkinson  Juvenile  Asylum  and  Farm  School  and  of  the 
Good  Will  Club,  and  a  director  of  the  American  School 
for  the  Deaf  and  the  Hartford  Retreat.  Mr.  Howe  had 
made  a  number  of  trips  to  Europe. 

He  died  May  13,  1917,  at  his  home  in  Hartford,  after 
an  illness  of  two  years  due  to  arterio  sclerosis,  and  was 
buried  in  Cedar  Hill  Cemetery. 

His  marriage  took  place  in  Hartford,  February  16,  1876, 
to  Henrietta  Atwood,  daughter  of  Erastus  and  Mary  S. 
(Atwood)  Collins,  and  granddaughter  of  John  M.  Atwood, 
a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1814.  She  survives  him  with 
their  three  children:  Edmund  Grant  (B.A.  1906,  M.A. 
Harvard  1907)  ;  Henrietta  Collins,  who  was  married  May 
6,  1908,  to  Clement  Scott  of  Hartford,  and  Marjorie 
Frances,  now  the  wife  of  Maynard  Hazen  of  Boston,  Mass. 
Mr.  Howe  also  leaves  a  sister,  three  grandchildren,  and  a 
niece. 

Whipple  Owen  Sayles,  B.A.   1874 

Born  January  14,  1849,  in  Pascoag,  R.  I. 
Died  January  2,  1917,  in  East  Orange,  N.  J. 

Whipple  Owen  Sayles,  son  of  Whipple  and  Abigal 
(Owen)   Sayles,  was  born  in  Pascoag,  R.  L,  January  14, 


346   .  YALE    COLLEGE 

1840  He  was  a  lineal  descendant  of  Roger  Williams,  and 
one  of  his  ancestors  signed  the  Declaration  of  Independ- 
ence. His  preparatory  training  was  received  at  Lapham 
Institute,  North  Scituate,  R.  L,  and  at  a  school  in  Westerly, 
R.  I.  He  entered  Hillsdale  College  in  Michigan,  but  after 
a  brief  stay  was  called  home  by  the  death  of  his  father. 
He  joined  the  Yale  Class  of  1874  as  a  Freshman. 

From  1874  to  1876  he  studied  in  the  Columbia  Law 
School,  and  in  the  latter  year  took  the  degree  of  Bachelor 
of  Laws.  He  was  then  admitted  to  the  bar  of  New  York 
State,  and  practiced  in  New  York  City  until  his  death. 
His  membership  in  the  New  York  Law  Institute  covered 
a  period  of  thirty-seven  years.  When  he  changed  his 
residence  from  New  York  to  East  Orange  some  years  ago, 
he  became  a  member  of  the  New  Jersey  Bar  and  joined 
the  First  Congregational  Church  of  East  Orange,  becoming 
connected  with  its  various  societies.  In  the  latter  part  of 
his  life  he  attended  the  Presbyterian  Church,  although  never 
taking  his  letter  from  the  First  Congregational  Church. 
He  was  an  acknowledged  power  in  the  ward  in  which  he 
lived,  doing  much  to  improve  conditions  there,  especially 
in  regard  to  clean  politics  and  in  the  fight  against  the 
liquor  traffic.  His  interest  in  public  affairs  was  cultivated 
early  in  the  home  circle  by  both  his  father  and  mother ;  for 
more  than  twenty  years  the  town  of  Burrillville,  R.  I., 
had  no  saloons,  chiefly  through  the  influence  and  deter- 
mination of  his  father. 

Mr.  Sayles  died  at  his  home  in  East  Orange,  January  2, 
19 1 7,  of  pneumonia,  which  developed  after  an  attack  of 
the  grippe. 

He  was  married  October  5,  1878,  in  Bloomfield,  N.  J., 
to  Emily  Sarah,  daughter  of  Enoch  W.  and  Mellissa  L. 
Page.  Two  of  their  children,  Whipple  Owen,  Jr.,  and 
Abigal  Edna,  died  in  infancy.  Mrs.  Sayles,  three  daugh- 
ters, Mellissa  Ruth,  Ethel  Mary,  and  Emily,  a  son,  Osmond 
Lyman,  and  a  sister  survive.  Another  sister  of  Mr.  Sayles 
died  a  few  years  ago;  she  had  served  for  forty  years  as 
a  missionary  in  India. 


i874  ^  347 


.  William  Nelson  Washburn,  B.A.   1874 

Born  July  30,  1851,  in  Orange,  Mass. 
Died  February  5,  1917,  in  Greenfield,  Mass. 

William  Nelson  Washburn  was  born  in  Orange,  Mass., 
July  30,  1 85 1.  His  father,  William  Barrett  Washburn 
(B.A.  1844,  LL.D.  Harvard  1872),  was  a  member  of  both 
houses  of  the  Massachusetts  State  Legislature  for  several 
years,  a  Congressman  from  1863  to  1871,  and  governor  of 
Massachusetts  from  1872  to  May,  1874,  when  he  resigned 
to  fill  an  unexpired  term  in  the  United  States  Senate.  Mr. 
Washburn  served  as  a  member  of  the  Yale  Corporation 
from  1872  to  1881,  and  he  was  also  a  trustee  of  Smith 
College  and  an  overseer  of  Amherst.  He  was  the  son  of 
Asa  and  Phebe  (Whitney)  Washburn,  the  grandson  of 
Phineas  Whitney- of  Winchester,  who  served  as  captain 
of  a  cavalry  company  active  in  putting  down  Shay's  Rebel- 
lion, and  a  descendant  of  John  Whitney,  who  came  to  this 
country  from  London,  and  settled  at  Watertown,  Mass. 
Hannah  Augusta  (Sweetser)  Washburn,  the  mother  of 
William  Nelson  Washburn,  was  the  daughter  of  Col. 
Samuel  Sweetser  and  Anna  R.  (Humphrey)  Sweetser. 

He  was  fitted  for  college  at  Williston  Seminary  in  East- 
hampton,  Mass.,  and  received  a  Dissertation  appointment 
in  both  Junior  and  Senior  years. 

Making  his  home  in  Greenfield,  Mass.,  since  graduation, 
he  had  taken  an  active  part  in  the  business  and  social 
life  of  that  town,  although  his  main  business  interest  had 
been  at  Erving,  Mass.,  not  far  from  Greenfield.  There 
his  father  had  established  a  company  for  the  manufacture 
of  chairs,  which  in  recent  years  had  been  known  as  the 
Washburn  &  Haywood  Chair  Company,  and  of  this  com- 
pany William  N.  Washburn  was  treasurer  at  his  death. 
He  was  also  a  director  of  the  First  National  Bank  of 
Greenfield,  president  of  the  Greenfield  Gas  Company,  the 
Greenfield  Library  Association,  and  the  Greenfield  Club, 
a  trustee  of  the  Franklin  Savings  Institution,  and  treasurer 
of  the  Greenfield  Country  Club.  He  was  deeply  interested 
in  various  movements  for  civic  betterment,  but  had  never 
cared  to  fill  any  municipal  offices.  He  was  a  member  of 
the  Society  of  the  Civil  War  and  the  United  Military  Order 
of    America,    and    attended    the    Second    Congregational 


■» 


34^  YALE    COLLEGE 

Church  of  Greenfield.  He  had  acquired  a  large  and  valu- 
able collection  of  rare  stamps. 

Mr.  Washburn  died  at  his  home  in  Greenfield,  February 
5,  1917,  after  a  two  weeks'  illness  of  myocarditis.  Burial 
was  in  Green  River  Cemetery  in  that  town. 

He  was  married  July  21,  1880,  in  Chicago,  III,  to  Jennie 
Eldridge,  daughter  of  William  Yocum  and  Ann  (Atkinson) 
Daniels.  Their  first  child  died  at  birth.  Mrs.  Washburn 
survives  her  husband  with  a  daughter,  Leila  A.,  who  mar- 
ried Horatio  Sanderson  duMont  of  Greenfield,  and  he 
also  leaves  a  grandson  and  three  sisters. 


Frank  Spencer  Witherbee,  B.A.   1874 

Born  May  12,  1852,  at  Port  Henry,  N.  Y. 
Died  April  13,  1917,  in  New  York  City 

Frank  Spencer  Witherbee  was  born  at  Port  Henry, 
N.  Y.,  May  12,  1852,  being  a  descendant  of  John  Witherbye, 
who  canie  to  this  country  in  1672,  was  one  of  the  founders 
of  Stowe,  Mass.,  and  fought  in  King  Philip's.  War.  His 
wife  was  Mary,  daughter  of  John  Howe,  one  of  the  first 
settlers  in  Marlboro,  Mass.  Among  their  descendants  were 
Thomas  Witherbye,  who  was  born  in  Sudbury,  Mass.,  in 
1678,  and  married  Hannah  Wood;  their  second  son,  Capt. 
Silas  Witherbye,  married  Thankful,  daughter  of  Major 
Keyes.  Jonathan  Gilman  Adams  Witherbee,  the  father  of 
Frank  S.  Witherbee,  was  the  son  of  Thomas  and  Millie 
(Adams)  Witherbye;  it  was  during  his  hfetime  that  the 
family  name  assumed  its  present  form.  His  wife,  Char- 
lotte (Spencer)  Witherbee,  whose  parents  were  Jonathan 
Buck  Spencer,  one  of  the  pioneers  in  developing  the  lumber 
districts  of  Canada  and  the  Western  states  and  who  dis- 
tinguished himself  in  the  War  of  181 2,  receiving  for  his 
services  a  tract  of  land  in  Iowa,  and  Mary  (Walker) 
Spencer,  traced  her  descent  to  Thomas  Spencer,  who  came 
to  America  from  Stratford,  England,  about  1632  and  settled 
at  Cambridge,  Mass.,  removing  to  Hartford,  Conn.,  five 
years  later. 

Entering  Yale  from  the  Hopkins  Grammar  School,  New 
Haven,   he    served   on   the   Junior    Promenade    and    Class 


1^74  349 

Supper  committees,  and  was  chairman  of  the  Senior  Prom- 
enade Committee. 

He  went  abroad  soon  after  his  graduation,  but  was 
called  home  in  August,  1875,  on  account  of  the  serious 
illness  of  his  father.  The  latter  died  soon  afterwards,  and 
Mr.  Witherbee  at  once  assumed  his  business  interests,  most 
of  which  were  concerned  with  the  mining  of  iron  ore  and 
the  manufacturing  of  pig  iron  in  the  vicinity  of  Port  Henry 
on  Lake  Champlain.  Becoming  a  co-partner  in  the  firm 
of  Witherbee,  Sherman  &  Company,  which  was  started  in 
1849  t>y  his  father  and  his  uncle,  Silas  H.  Witherbee,  he 
had  seen  the  business  increase  rapidly  until  at  his  death 
the  concern  was  one  of  the  largest  producers  of  separated 
iron  ore  in  the  world.  Pie  had  been  president  of  the  com- 
pany since  its  incorporation  in  1900.  He  was  also  presi- 
dent of  the  Lake  Champlain  &  Moriah  Railroad  and  a 
director  in  the  Cheever  Iron  Ore  Company,  the  Citizens 
National  Bank  of  Port  Henry,  the  Central  Hudson  Steam- 
boat Company,  the  Equitable  Life  Assurance  Society,  the 
Cubitas  Iron  Ore  Company  of  Cuba,  and  the  Fulton  Trust 
Company  and  Chatham  &  Phenix  National  Bank  of  New 
York  City. 

Mr.  Witherbee  early  became  prominent  in  various  phases 
of  civic  and  social  life.  He  had  attended  a  number  of 
the  state  and  national  political  conventions  of  the  Repub- 
lican party,  serving  on  a  number  of  committees,  and  was 
twice  a  presidential  elector.  He  was  interested  in  the 
different  primary  laws,  took  an  active  part  in  the  creation 
of  the  Adirondack  State  Park  and  the  Crown  Point  State 
Reservation,  and  was  one  of  the  foremost  advocates  of 
improved  waterways  for  the  state  of  New  York.  He  had 
served  on  the  New  York  Board  of  Trade  and  Transporta- 
tion, and  on  a  number  of  canal  commissions,  and  was  one 
of  the  three  commissioners  appointed  by  Governor  Roose- 
velt to  study  and  report  on  the  canal  systems  of  Europe. 
In  1912  he  received  the  cross  of  the  Legion  of  Honor 
from  the  French  Government  in  recognition  of  his  services 
on  the  Champlain  Tercentenary  Celebration  Commission. 
He  had  served  as  a  member  of  the  state  committee  of  the 
Young  Men's  Christian  Association,  and  as  a  manager  of 
the  House  of  Refuge,  a  reformatory  for  boys,  and  the 
Orthopedic  Hospital.  He  was  president  and  a  trustee  of 
the  Sherman  Free  Library  of  Port  Henry,  and  was  espe- 


35^  YALE    COLLEGE 

cially  interested  in  the  work  of  the  Witherbee  Memorial 
Association,  organized  to  conduct  a  workingmen's  cKib  at 
the  mines.  He  belonged  to  the  American  Institute  of 
Mining  Engineers,  the  Lake  Superior  Institute  of  Mining 
Engineers,  the  New  York  Chamber  of  Commerce,  the 
Academy  of  Political  and  Social  Science,  the  Sons  of  the 
Revolution,  the  Pilgrim  Society,  and  the  National  His- 
torical Association.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Port  Henry 
Presbyterian  Church,  but  when  in  New  York  City  attended 
Grace  Protestant  Episcopal  Church.  He  was  for  five  years 
a  member  of  the  New  Yoil^  National  Guard,  completing  his 
service  in  1880. 

Mr.  Witherbee's  death  occurred  April  13,  191 7,  at  his 
New  York  home,  as  the  result  of  a  complication  of  diseases. 
He  had  been  in  poor  health  for  several  years,  but  was 
able  to  keep  up  his  many  activities  until  within  a  short  time 
of  his  death.  Interment  was  in  Greenwood  Cemetery, 
Brooklyn. 

He  was  married  in  New  York  City,  April  25,  1883,  to 
Mary  Rhinelander,  daughter  of  Lispenard  and  Mary 
Rogers  (Rhinelander)  Stewart,  and  sister  of  Lispenard 
Stewart  (B.A.  1876,  LL.B.  Columbia  1878).  They  had 
three  children:  a  daughter  who  died  at  birth,  Lispenard 
Stewart,  and  Evelyn  Spencer.  The  son  died  February  8, 
1907,  while  in  his  Senior  year  at  Yale;  he  was  given  his 
B.A.  post  obit,  the  following  June.  Besides  his  wife  and 
daughter,  Mr.  Witherbee  is  survived  by  a  sister,  who  mar- 
ried Edward  H.  Peaslee  (B.A.  1872,  M.D.  Columbia  1875), 
and  whose  son,  Edmund  W.  Peaslee,  graduated  from  the 
College  in  191 3.  He  was  a  cousin  of  Walter  C.  Witherbee 
(B.A.  t88o),  and  a  second  cousin  of  Silas  H.  Witherbee 
(Ph.B.  1911). 


James  Wilton  Brooks,  B.A.   1875 

Born  April  19,  1853,  in  New  York  City 
Died  July  6,  1916,  in  Atlantic  City,  N.  J. 

Tames  Wilton  Brooks,  son  of  James  and  Mary  Louisa 
(Randolph  nee  Cunningham)  Brooks,  was  born  April  19, 
1853,  in  New  York  City.  His  father,  a  graduate  of  Colby 
College  in  1828,  was  elected  to  the  Maine  Legislature  at 


1874-1875  351 

the  age  of  twenty-one,  and  the  next  year  went  to  Wash- 
ington as  a  poUtical  correspondent.  In  1836  he  founded 
the  New  York  Express,  of  which  he  was  for  nearly  forty 
years  editor  and  proprietor.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
New  York  Legislature  in  1847  and  Congressman  from 
1849  to  1853  and  again  from  1863  until  his  death  in  1873. 
His  parents  were  Capt.  James  "Brooks,  a  native  of  England, 
and  Elizabeth  (Folsom)  Brooks,  whose  ancestors  settled 
in  Massachusetts  in  1638.  Captain  Brooks  was  killed  in 
the  War  of  1812,  while  in  command  of  the  privateer 
Yankee.  J.  Wilton  Brooks'  maternal  ancestors  were  early 
settlers  at  Wilton,  Va. 

He  was  prepared  for  college  under  private  tutors.  In 
his  Senior  year  he  was  on  the  editorial  board  of  the 
Yale  Literary  Magazine. 

Mr.  Brooks  lived  abroad  for  several  years  after  gradua- 
tion, returning  to  New  York  to  become  city  editor  of  the 
Express.  He  was  shortly  made  general  editor,  and  retained 
that  post  until  1881,  when  he  sold  his  interest  in  the  paper. 
In  the  meantime  he  had  studied  law  at  Columbia,  and  on 
being  admitted  to  the  New  York  Bar  in  1882,  opened 
offices  in  New  York  City.  He  continued  in  practice  there 
for  some  years.  He  was  a  candidate  on  the  Democratic 
ticket  for  the  New  York  Assembly  in  1881,  and  the  follow- 
ing year  was  elected  to  the  Legislature,  where  he  served 
two  terms.  He  was  appointed  alternate  to  the  Republican 
National  Convention  of  1884  from  the  sixteenth  Congres- 
sional district  of  New  York.  At  one  time  he  was  the 
editor  of  the  now  extinct  University  Magazine.  He  had 
contributed  numerous  articles  to  periodicals,  and  was  the 
author  of  a  "History  of  the  Court  of  Common  Pleas  of 
the  City  and  County  of  New  York,"  published  in  1896. 
He  was  a  Fellow  of  the  Society  of  Science,  Letters  and 
Art  of  London,  and  a  member  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal 
Church.  In  1890  St.  John's  University,  Annapolis,  con- 
ferred the  honorary  degree  of  LL.D.  upon  him. 

Mr.  Brooks'  death  occurred  July  6,  1916,  at  Atlantic 
City,  N.  J.  He  was  buried  in  Greenwood  Cemetery, 
Brooklyn. 

His  first  marriage  took  place  September  14,  1880,  at 
Cold-Spring-on-Hudson,  N.  Y.,  to  Laura  Gertrude,  daugh- 
ter of  Benjamin  Winchester.  She  died  in  1888,  and  on 
November  29,  1893,  Mr.  Brooks  married  Florence,  daugh- 


352  YALE    COLLEGE 

ter  of  Henry  James  Miller.  He  was  next- married,  April 
2,  1912,  in  Valetta,  Malta,  to  Mrs.  Frances  Irving  (Rease) 
Beadel,  daughter  of  George  B.  and  Elizabeth  (Irving) 
Rease,  and  widow  of  Frederick  Beadel.  Mrs.  Brooks  sur- 
vives her  husband.    He  had  no  children. 


Edward  Henry  Rogers,  B.A.   1875 

Born  September  4,  1854,  in  Branford,  Conn. 
Died  March  7,  1917,  in  New  Haven,  Conn, 

Edward  Henry  Rogers  was  born  September  4,  1854, 
in  Branford,  Conn.,  the  family  home  since  1720.  The 
pioneer  member  of  the  family  in  this  country  was  John 
Rogers,  who  came  from  England  to  Plymouth,  Mass.,  in 
1620.  Other  ancestors  on  the  paternal  side  were  Abraham 
Rogers,  Jr.,  Eli  Fowler,  Noah  Fowler,  and  Abraham 
Fowler ;  the  last  named  was  wounded  in  King  Philip's 
War  in  1675.  Edward  H.  Rogers'  parents  were  Henry 
Rogers,  a  member  of  the  General  Assembly  of  Connecticut 
in  1877,  who  was  an  authority  on  the  genealogy  of  old 
Connecticut  families,  and  Elizabeth  (Townsend)  Rogers, 
daughter  of  John  and  Parnel  (Bishop)  Townsend  of  West- 
moreland, Oneida  County,  N.  Y. 

Prepared  for  college  at  the  Whitestown  (N.  Y.)  Semi- 
nary, he  entered  Yale  in  1871,  receiving  the  degree  of 
B.A.  in  1875  and  that  of  LL.B.  in  1877.  He  had  been 
admitted  to  the  bar  of  Connecticut  in  January  of  1877,  and 
with  the  exception  of  three  years  (1889  to  1892),  when 
he  was  a  member  of  the  patent  staff  of  the  Westinghouse 
Electrical  Company  in  New  York  City,  had  always  prac- 
ticed in  New  Haven.  During  the  early  part  of  his  pro- 
fessional career  he  was  associated  with  Talcott  H.  Russell 
(B.A.  1869,  LL.B.  Columbia  1871),  afterwards  being  a 
member  of  the  firm  of  Clark,  Swan  &  Rogers,  in  which 
his  partners  were  James  Gardner  Clark  (B.A.  1861)  and 
Charles  L.  Swan,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1874  and 
of  the  School  of  Law  in  1877.  On  returning  from  New 
York  in  1892,  he  became  associated  with  Charles  R.  Inger- 
soll  (B.A.  1840,  LL.D.  1874),  a  former  governor  of  Con- 
necticut, with  whom  he  was  connected  until  1902.  He 
then  had  his  offices  with  Judge  Jacob  B.  Ullman   (LL.B. 


I 


1875-1876  353 

1899)  'J^til  the  latter's  death  in  1906.  While  indination 
turned  him  more  exclusively  for  a  time  to  the  practice  of 
patent  and  admiralty  law,  Mr.  Rogers'  strength  in  his  pro- 
fession was  not  confined  to  these  departments  of  it ;  he 
was  in  the  fullest  sense  a  strong  lawyer  in  his  grasp  of 
the  general  principles  of  jurisprudence,  with  an  exceptional 
knowledge  and  understanding  of  the  case  law  of  his  own 
state.  He  was  especially  noted  for  his  skill  in  writing 
briefs  on  questions  of  law.  He  served  as  corporation 
counsel  for  the  city  of  New  Haven  from  1908  to  19 10. 
He  was  a  member  of  the  American  Bar  Association,  and 
a  communicant  of  St.  Paul's  Protestant  Episcopal  Church, 
and  had  served  as  the  local  member  of  the  various  reunion 
committees  for  the  Class  of  1875. 

His  death,  occurring  March  7,  1917,  at  his  home  in  New 
Haven,  followed  a  brief  illness  of  pneumonia.  He  was 
buried  in  the  family  plot  in  Branford. 

Mr.  Rogers  was  married  in  Plainville,  -Conn.,  June  7» 
1883,  to  Henrietta  Frances,  daughter  of  Edward  N.  and 
Permelia  Frances  (Thompson)  Pierce.  She  survives  him 
with  a  daughter,  Elizabeth  Townsend,  who  graduated  from 
Vassar  College  in  1910  and  was  married  June  30,  1913, 
to  James  Lukens  McConaughy  (B.A.  1909,  M.A.  Bowdoin 
191 1,  Ph.D.  Columbia  1913).  Their  son,  Edward  Pierce, 
died  December  22,  1914,  while  in  his  Senior  year  at  Yale. 
A  sister  of  Mrs.  Rogers  married  William  E.  Peck  (B.A. 
1881). 

Chester  Mitchell  Dawes,  B.A.   1876 

Born  July  14,   1855,  in  North  Adams,  Mass. 
Died  April   12,   1917,  in  Chicago,   111. 

Chester  Mitchell  Dawes  was  born  in  North  Adams, 
Mass.,  July  14,  1855,  the  son  of  Henry  Laurens  and  Electa 
Allen  (Sanderson)  Dawes.  His  father's  parents  were 
Mitchell  and  Mercy  (Burgess)  Dawes,  and  he  was  a 
descendant  of  William  Dawes,  who  came  from  England 
in  1G35  ^nd  settled  in  Massachusetts.  He  graduated  from 
Yale  in  1839,  served  for  several  years  in  both  houses  of 
the  Massachusetts  Legislature,  and  was  elected  to  Congress 
in  1857,  being  from  1857  to  1875  a  member  of  the  House 
of  Representatives  and  from  1875  to  1893  ^  member  of 
the  Senate ;   he  received  an  honorary  LL.D.  from  Williams 


354  YALE    COLLEGE 

in  1869  and  from  Yale  in  1889.  His  wife  was  the  daughter 
of  Chester  and  Anna  (AlHs)  Sanderson,  and  through  her 
Chester  M.  Dawes  traced  his  descent  to  Robert  Sanderson, 
who  emigrated  to  this  country  from  England  in  1637, 
settling  at  Boston  in  1652  as  master  of  the  Mint  and  there 
making  the  pine-tree  shilling. 

He  was  fitted  for  college  at  Williston  Seminary,  East- 
hampton,  Mass.,  and  at  the  Hopkins  Grammar  School, 
New  Haven.  In  Freshman  year  he  served  on  the  Class 
Supper  Committee  and  as  treasurer  of  the  Class  Boat 
Committee.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Class  Baseball  Team 
in  Sophomore  year  and  of  the  University  Baseball  Team 
in  Senior  year.  His  Junior  appointment  was  a  Second 
Dispute,  and  at  Commencement  he  received  a  Second 
Colloquy. 

Soon  after  his  graduation  from  Yale  Mr.  Dawes  began 
the  study  of  law  in  the  offices  of  Hillard,  Hyde  &  Dickinson 
in  Boston,  at  the  same  time  attending  lectures  at  the  Boston 
University  Law  School,  where  he  received  the  degree  of 
LL.B.  in  1878.  He  was  admitted  to  the  Massachusetts 
Bar  the  following  November,  and  for  nearly  a  year  after- 
wards continued  in  the  same  office  in  Boston.  In  October, 
1879,  he  removed  to  Chicago,  111.,  and  within  a  few  months 
formed  a  partnership  with  Frederick  H.  Winston  (LL.B. 
Harvard  1853)  and  the  latter's  son,  Frederick  S.  Winston, 
a  member  of  the  Yale  Class  of  1877,  under  the  firm  name 
of  Winston  &  Dawes.  From  February,  1884,  until  the 
summer  of  1886  Mr.  Dawes  served  as  assistant  United 
States  attorney  for  the  Northern  District  of  Illinois.  In 
September,  1886,  he  accepted  an  appointment  as  assistant 
solicitor  of  the  Chicago,  Burlington  &  Quincy  Railroad 
Company,  fifteen  years  later  being  made  general  solicitor 
and,  in  1909,  general  counsel  for  the  company.  He  held 
this  latter  position  at  the  time  of  his  death.  He  was  also 
a  director  of  the  Washington  &  Quincy  Railroad.  A 
Republican  in  politics,  he  served  as  a  presidential  elector 
in  1896.  Mr.  Dawes  was  a  member  of  the  Chicago  Board 
of  Education  from  1899  to  1902  and  again  from  1907  to 
1909. 

His  death  occurred  April  12,  1917,  at  his  home  in  Chi- 
cago, after  an  illness  of  a  few  hours  due  to  angina  pectoris. 
He  was  buried  in  Pittsfield,  Mass.,  his  father's  home  having 
been  in  that  city  for  many  years. 


1876  355 

Mr.  Dawes  was  married  May  12,  1881,  to  Ada  B., 
daughter  of  Gen.  Byron  Laflin  and  Frances  Ann  (Caswell) 
Laflin.  Their  only  children  were  twins,  Chester  Mitchell, 
Jr.,  and  Electa  Sanderson.  The  son  died  in  early  infancy 
and  the  daughter  in  November,  1902.  Mr.  Dawes  is  sur- 
vived by  his  wife,  a  brother,  Henry  Laurens  Dawes  (B.A. 
1884),  and  a  sister. 


Joseph  Sexton  Hunn,  B.A.   1876 

Born  July  31,  1851,  in  Rochester,  N.  Y. 
Died  May  31,  1917,  in  Rochester,  N.  Y. 

Joseph  Sexton  Hunn,  whose  parents  were  Francis  Sexton 
and  Catherine  M.  (Krake)  Hunn,  was  born  July  31,  1851, 
in  Rochester,  N.  Y.  His  father  was  a  manufacturer  of 
furniture  in  Rochester,  and  the  son  of  Rev.  David  Lothrop 
Hunn,  who  was  graduated  from  Yale  in  181 3  and  from 
the  Andover  Theological  Seminary  in  1816,  and  of  Eunice 
(Sexton)  Hunn.  Rev.  David  Hunn  was  a  grandnephew 
of  Rev.  Zadock  Hunn  (B.A.  1766),  and  a  descendant  of 
Rev.  Nathaniel  Hunn,  who  received  his  B.A.  at  Yale  in 
1 73 1.  The  founders  of  the  American  branch  of  the  family 
were  Jonathan,  David,  and  Gideon  Hunn,  three  brothers, 
who  came  from  England  about  1680  and  settled  in  Lyme 
and  Wethersfield,  Conn.  Ephraim  Tiffany  Hunn,  grandson 
of  Jonathan  Hunn  and  great-grandfather  of  Joseph  Sexton 
Hunn,  was  a  Revolutionary  privateersman,  at  one  time 
confined  on  the  prison-ship  Jersey,  and  was  in  service  at 
New  London  at  the  time  that  that  city  was  burned,  in  1781. 
On  the  maternal  side,  Joseph  S.  Hunn  was  descended  from 
Caliph  Krake,  who  emigrated  to  this  country  about  1760 
from  Germany,  enlisted  in  the  Revolutionary  War,  and 
later  settled  with  his  wife,  Elizabeth  (Hills)  Krake,  in  her 
birthplace,  Minden,  N.  Y.  His  mother's  parents  were 
Henry  Krake,  wdio  served  in  the  War  of  1812,  and  Eliza- 
beth (Porter)  Krake. 

He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  Wilson's  Grammar  School, 
Rochester.  In  college  he  served  on  the  Record  board  in 
Sophomore  and  Senior  years,  and  received  a  Second  Dis- 
pute appointment  in  Junior  year  and  a  First  Colloquy  at 
Commencement. 


35^  YALE    COLLEGE 

Returning  to  Rochester  upon  graduation,  he  began  the 
study  of  law  in  the  office  of  George  F.  Danforth  (B.A. 
Union  1840,  LL.D.  Union  and  Hamihon  1879),  afterwards 
a  judge  of  the  Court  of  Appeals  of  New  York  State.  He 
was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  1879,  and,  after  two  years  of 
practice,  became  associated  with  his  classmate,  William 
DeLancey  EUwanger.  They  continued  in  partnership  under 
the  name  of  Hunn  &  EUwanger  until  1904,  when  the  firm 
was  dissolved  by  mutual  consent.  Thereafter  Mr.  Hunn 
devoted  practically  all  of  his  time  to  his  duties  as  trustee 
of  the  Hiram  Sibley  Estate  of  Rochester.  He  was  an 
officer  of  the  McKinley-Darragh-Savage  Mines  of  Cobalt, 
Ltd.,  and  a  manager  of  the  Rochester  Homeopathic  Hos- 
pital, of  which  he  was  for  about  two  years  the  treasurer. 
He  also  served  at  different  times  as  president  of  the  Yale 
Alumni  Association  of  Rochester  and  of  the  Genesee  Valley 
Club.  He  was  one  of  the  founders  of  and  a  principal  sub- 
scriber to  an  endowed  scholarship  in  Rochester,  by  which 
one  Rochester  boy,  who  otherwise  would  be  denied  the 
privilege,  is  kept  at  Yale. 

Mr.  Hunn  died  May  31,  1917,  at  the  Rochester  Homeo- 
pathic Hospital,  after  an  illness  of  about  three  weeks  due  to 
a  carbuncle,  complicated  with  a  severe  attack  of  acute  dia- 
betes. His  body,  by  his  own  wish,  was  cremated,  and  the 
ashes  interred  in  Mount  Hope  Cemetery,  Rochester. 

He  was  married  August  12,  1882,  in  Buffalo,  N.  Y.,  to 
Mary  Kempshall,  daughter  of  Col.  Watson  Alanson  Fox 
and  Flora  Lavinia  (Rice)  Fox.  Her  death  occurred  May 
7,  1888,  four  days  after  the  birth  of  their  only  son,  Clarke 
Fox.  The  latter,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  191 1  and 
assistant  in  English  there  in  1911-12,  survives.  Mr.  Hunn 
also  leaves  five  brothers  and  a  sister.  He  was  an  uncle  of 
the  late  Francis  Sherman  Hunn  (Ph.B.  1899),  and  a  second 
cousin  of  Edward  B.  Hunn  (Ph.B.  1916),  whose  attend- 
ance at  the  University  was  due  largely  to  Mr.  Hunn's 
influence  and  assistance. 


Louis  William  Maxson,  B.A.   1876 

Born  July  2,  1855,  in  Herbertville,  Calif. 
Died  July  2,  1916,  in  Baltimore,  Md. 

Louis  William  Maxson,  whose  parents  were  Frank  Max- 
son,  a  mining  and  mechanical  engineer,  and  Juliet   (Lan- 


1876  357 

phear)  Maxson,  was  born  in  Herbertville,  Amador  County, 
Calif.,  July  2,  1855.  His  father  was  the  son  of  Asa  and 
Mary  (Chapman)  Maxson,  and  a  descendant  of  John 
Maxson,  born  in  1638,  whose  father  came  to  this  country, 
probably  from  England,  between  1630  and  1635  and  settled 
at  Newport,  R.  I.  His  mother,  who  was  the  daughter  of 
William  and  Eliza  (Miner)  Lanphear,  traced  her  descent 
to  the  Lanphears  who  emigrated  to  America  in  1689, 
settling  at  or  in  the  neighborhood  of  Westerly,  R.  I. 

E[is  boyhood  was  spent  partly  in  the  Sierra  Nevada  foot- 
hills of  Amador  and  Calaveras  counties,  Calif.,  and  partly 
in  Norwich,  Conn.  He  received  his  preparatory  training 
at  the  Norwich  Free  Academy.  In  Sophomore  year  at 
Yale  a  second  prize  in  mathematics  was  awarded  to  him. 
His  Junior  appointment  was  a  First  Colloquy,  and  he 
received  a  First  Dispute  at  Commencement. 

For  four  years  after  graduation  Mr.  Maxson  was 
engaged  in  educational  work.  He  was  principal  of  the 
Academy  at  Greens  Farms,  Conn.,  during  1876-77,  teacher 
of  classics  and  mathematics  and,  for  a  part  of  the  time, 
acting  principal  at  the  Port  Chester  (N.  Y.)  Military  Acad- 
emy the  next  year,  and  instructor  in  classics  and  mathe- 
matics at  the  Emerson  Institute  in  Washington,  D.  C,  from 
1878  to  1880.  During  this  latter  period  he  also  gave  some 
time  to  private  tutoring.  In  August,  1880,  he  entered  the 
United  States  Patent  Office  as  fourth  assistant  examiner. 
For  many  years  previous  to  his  death  he  had  held  the 
appointment  of  principal  examiner  in  charge  of  Division  14. 
Mr.  Maxson  studied  law  in  the  early  years  of  his  work  in 
Washington,  and  received  the  degree  of  LL.B.  from  George 
W^ashington  University  in  1882  and  that  of  M.L.  the  fol- 
lowing year. 

His  home  was  in  Washington  from  1878  to  1894,  when 
he  moved  to  Kensington,  Md.,  his  place  of  residence  at  the 
time  of  his  death.  He  was  active  in  church  work,  having 
been  an  elder  in  the  Metropolitan  Presbyterian  Church  of 
Washington  for  several  years  prior  to  his  removal  to  Ken- 
sington and  an  elder  in  the  Warner  Memorial  Presbyterian 
Church  of  the  latter  place  almost  from  the  time  of  its 
founding  to  his  death.  For  two  years  he  served  as  physical 
1  director  of  the  gymnasium  of  the  church,  and  for  several 

■^L  years  was  a  member  of  the  Public  School  Board  of  the 
IH^  town.  He  held  the  national  championship  in  archery  for 
IB   eight  years. 

L 


35 8  YALE    COLLEGE 

His  death  occurred  July  2,  19 16,  at  the  Johns  Hopkins 
Hospital,  Baltimore,  following  an  operation  for  carcinoma. 
He  had  been  in  poor  health  for  nearly  a  year.  Interment 
was  in  the  Congressional  Cemetery  at  Washington. 

He  was  married  December  25,  1884,  in  that  city,  to 
Minnie  Rosetta,  daughter  of  George  Alexander  and  Cath- 
erine (Otterback)  Bohrer.  She  survives  him  with  their 
two  sons,  Louis  Archer,  a  graduate  of  George  Washington 
University,  Washington,  with  the  degrees  of  B.A.  and 
M.S.  in  1913  and  191 5,  respectively,  and  Donald  Livingston. 
He  also  leaves  a  sister  and  two  brothers,  one  of  the  latter 
being  Frank  Oscar  Maxson  (Ph.B.  1872,  C.E.  1882). 
Mr.  Maxson's  oldest  child,  Constance  Elaine,  died  in 
infancy. 


Francis  Joseph  Woodman,  B.A.   1876 

Born  August  7,   1851,  at  Great  Falls    (now   Somersworth),  N.   H. 
Died  July  28,  1916,  in  Washington,  D.  C. 

Francis  Joseph  Woodman,  whose  parents  were  Joseph 
and  Sarah  (LeGros)  Woodman,  was  born  at  Great  Falls 
(now  Somersworth),  N.  H.,  August  7,  185 1.  His  mother 
was  the  daughter  of  Isaiah  and  Eunice  (Burrows)  LeGros, 
and  the  granddaughter  of  Jonathan  Burrows,  who  served 
in  the  Revolutionary  War  as  orderly  sergeant  in  a  New 
Hampshire  Regiment. 

He  entered  Phillips  (Exeter)  Academy  at  the  age  of 
nineteen  years,  graduating  in  1872.  He  was  a  member 
of  the  Class  and  University  Glee  clubs  throughout  his 
course  at  Yale. 

During  the  three  years  immediately  following  his  gradua- 
tion he  lived  in  his  native  town,  engaged  in  journalistic 
work.  He  was  editor  and  manager  of  the  Free  Press  for 
the  greater  part  of  this  period,  but  in  the  spring  of  1879 
became  editor  of  the  Journal.  Fie  severed  his  connection 
with  the  latter  publication  in  October  of  that  year,  and 
removed  to  Washington,  D.  C,  where  he  took  a  position 
in  the  United  States  Pension  Bureau.  He  began  the  study 
of  medicine  at  George  Washington  Universitv  in  1883,  two 
vears  later  receiving  the  degree  of  M.D.  Since  that  time 
his  work  in  the  Pension  Bureau  had  been  in  the  Medical 
Division.     He  had  advanced  through  many  grades  to  the 


I 


1876-1877  359 

position  of  qualified  surgeon,  an  office  which  he  held  until 
failing  health  compelled  his  resignation  early  in  1916.  In 
addition  to  his  duties  for  the  Government,  he  had  also 
practiced  his  profession  to  a  slight  extent,  and  had  served 
as  professor  of  pathology  in  the  United  States  College  of 
Veterinary  Surgeons  at  Washington.  In  October,  1889, 
Dr.  Woodman  received  a  commission  as  a  medical  officer 
in  the  National  Guard  of  the  District  of  Columbia.  In 
1909,  after  twenty  years'  service,  he  was  retired,  at  his 
own  request,  at  that  time  ranking  as  major  in  the  Medical 
Corps.  He  had  long  been  prominent  in  Masonry.  He 
was  admitted  to  the  thirty-third  degree  some  years 
ago,  and  since  1909  had  held  the  office  of  grand  tiler  of 
the  supreme  council  of  the  Scottish  Rite  for  the  Southern 
jurisdiction  of  the  United  States.  He  was  a  member  of 
the  Sons  of  the  American  Revolution,  had  served  on  the 
executive  committee  of  the  Yale  Alumni  Association  of 
Washington,  and  belonged  to  St.  James'  Protestant  Episco- 
pal Church,  where  he  was  a  lay  reader. 

His  death  occurred  at  his  home  in  Washington,  July  28, 
1916,  after  a  lingering  illness  due  to  cirrhosis  of  the  liver. 
Interment  was  in  Forest  Glade  Cemetery,  Somersworth, 
N.  H. 

Dr.  Woodman  was  married  June  30,  1884,  in  Washing- 
ton, to  Jennie  Whitmore,  daughter  of  Benjamin  and  Zilpha 
A.  (Whitney)  Cutter  of  Westbrook,  Maine.  Neither  of 
their  two  sons — LeGros  and  Francis  Joseph,  Jr. — is  living. 
Mrs.  Woodman  survives  her  husband.  His  brother,  the 
late  Charles  Carroll  Woodman  (B.A.  Dartmouth  1867), 
was  an  assistant  surgeon  in  the  United  States  Army. 


Frederick  Wendell  Davis,  B.A.   1877 

Born  September  9,  1855,  in  Hartford,  Conn. 
Died  June  16,  1917,  in  Hartford,  Conn. 

Frederick  Wendell  Davis  was  born  September  9,  1855, 
in  Hartford,  Conn.,  his  parents  being  Gustavus  Fellowes 
and  Lucy  Terry  (Strong)  Davis.  His  father,  for  many 
years  president  of  the  City  Bank  of  Hartford,  was  the 
son  of  Gustavus  Fellowes  Davis,  a  Baptist  minister,  who 
received  honorary  degrees  from  Colby,  Yale,  and  Wesleyan, 


360  YALE    COLLEGE 

and  Abigail  (Leonard)  Davis,  and  a  descendant  of  Robert 
Davis,  who  came  from  England  in  1638,  and  settled  in 
Yarmouth,  Mass.,  twelve  years  later  removing  to  Barn- 
stable. His  mother's  parents  were  William  and  Naomi 
(Terry)  Strong.  She  traced  her  descent  to  Governor  Wil- 
liam Bradford.  Frederick  W.  Davis  was  also  related  to 
the  Strong,  Wolcott,  Quincy,  and  Wendell  families,  his 
ancestors  including  Roger  Wolcott,  governor  of  Con- 
necticut from  1 75 1  to  1754. 

Entering  Yale  from  the  Hartford  Public  High  School, 
he  served  as  treasurer  of  the  Class  Boat  Club  in  vSophomore 
year,  and  as  assistant  treasurer  of  the  University  Boat 
Club  the  next  year,  being  president  of  the  latter  organiza- 
tion in  Senior  year.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Class  Glee 
Club  for  three  years,  and  was  leader  of  the  University 
Glee  Club  and  played  on  the  University  Football  Team  in 
Senior  year. 

Mr.  Davis  went  to  New  Orleans,  La.,  in  December,  1878, 
with  the  firm  of  Smith  &  Boullemet,  after  spending  a  year 
in  their  Louisville  office.  In  1881  he  returned  to  Hartford, 
and  had  since  made  his  home  in  that  city.  He  was  con- 
nected with  the  Colt's  Patent  Fire  Arms  Manufacturing 
Company  and  the  Perkins  Electric  Switch  Manufacturing 
Company,  and  in  1896  took  a  position  with  the  firm  of 
J.  J.  &  F.  Goodwin,  retaining  his  connection  with  that  firm 
until  October,  1916,  when  he  retired  from  business.  For 
several  years  he  served  as  auditor  of  the  Travelers  Insur- 
ance Company,  and  he  had  been  connected  with  the  Hartford 
Street  Railway  Company  and  the  Wadsworth  Athenaeum 
in  a  similar  capacity.  He  was  a  trustee  of  the  State  Savings 
Bank  and  the  Morris  Plan  Company.  He  was  a  member 
of  the  Hartford  Common  Council  in  1897,  and  served  for 
eleven  years  on  the  Hartford  Public  High  School  Com- 
mittee. He  was  a  member  of  the  Archaeological  Club,  the 
Society  of  Mayflower  Descendants,  the  Drama  League,  the 
Municipal  Society,  and  the  Navy  League.  He  belonged 
to  the  First  Church  (Congregational). 

He  died  at  his  home  in  Hartford,  June  16,  1917,  as  the 
result  of  heart  trouble,  from  which  he  had  suffered  for 
several  years.  With  Mrs.  Davis,  he  spent  four  months  in 
Florida  this  past  winter,  dividing  the  time  between  Cocoa- 
nut  Grove  and  Ormond  Beach. 

Mr.  Davis  was  twice  married,  his  first  wife  being  Lucy 


1877-1878  36i 

Trumbull,  daughter  of  Morris  Woodward  and  Julia 
(Palmer)  Smith.  Their  marriage  took  place  September 
30,  1879,  in  New  Hartford,  Conn.,  and  one  son,  Carl  Willis, 
was  born  to  them.  The  latter  received  the  degrees  of  B.A. 
and  M.A.  at  Yale  in  1902  and  1908,  respectively.  Mrs. 
Davis  died  February  i,  1881,  and  on  October  i,  1884,  he 
was  married  in  Hampton,  Conn.,  to  Mary,  daughter  of 
Henry  Griswold  and  Delia  Williams  (Ellsworth)  Taintor, 
and  sister  of  the  late  Henry  Ellsworth  Taintor  (B.A.  1865). 
By  this  marriage  Mr.  Davis  had  four  children:  Dorothy 
Wendell  (B.A.  Smith  1907),  the  wife  of  James  Lippincott 
Goodwin  (B.A.  1905,  M.F.  1910)  of  Hartford;  Roger 
Wolcott,  who  graduated  from  the  Scientific  School  in  191 1 
and  from  the  School  of  Law  in  1913;  Frederick  Ellsworth, 
a  graduate  of  Annapolis  in  19 13,  now  a  lieutenant  in  the 
United  States  Navy,  and  Elise  Pierrepont,  who  died  April 
16,  1906.  Besides  his  wife  and  four  children,  he  is  survived 
by  a  granddaughter  and  one  sister.  Another  sister,  who 
was  the  wife  of  Rev.  Wilder  Smith  (B.A.  1857),  died  in 
191 5,  and  a  brother,  Gustavus  Pierrepont  Davis  (B.A.  1866, 
M.D.  Columbia  1869),  in  1914.  The  latter's  son,  Arthur 
W.  Davis,  graduated  from  the  College  in  1899,  his  death 
occurring  in  1904,  and  two  daughters  married  Yale  men, 
one  being  the  wife  of  Otto  A.  Schreiber  (B.A.  1892)  and 
the  other  of  W.  Stuart  Glazier  (B.A.  1906).  Mr.  Davis 
was  a  cousin  of  Pierpont  V.  Davis  (B.A.  1905),  Howard 
C.  Davis  (B.A.  1909),  and  Everett  D.  Davis  (B.A.  1914), 
and  an  uncle  by  marriage  of  the  late  Harlan  Henry  Taintor, 
who  graduated  from  Yale  College  in  1892,  and  of  Bradford 
Ellsworth  (B.A.  1903). 


Paul  Charlton,  B.A.   1878 

Born  November  2,  1856,  in  Harrisburg,  Pa. 
Died  June  4,   1917,  in  Jiiana  Diaz,   Porto  Rico 

Paul  Charlton  was  born  in  Harrisburg,  Pa.,  November  2, 
1856,  the  son  of  Dr.  Samuel  Templeton  Charlton  and  Clare 
J.  (Porter)  Charlton.  His  father,  who  was  for  a  time  a 
member  of  the  Class  of  1846  at  Washington  (now  Wash- 
ington and  Jefferson)  College  and  was  graduated  from  the 
Medical  Department  of  New  York  University  in  1850, 
practiced  medicine  at  Harrisburg  for  many  years,  serving 


3^2  YALE   COLLEGE 

as  surgeon  in  a  Pennsylvania  regiment  during  the  Civil 
War.  He  was  the  son  of  Dr.  James  Charlton,  an  English- 
man, who  came  to  this  country  from  England  about  1810, 
settling  at  Alexandria,  Va.,  and  Nancy  (Templeton)  Charl- 
ton. His  wife  was  the  daughter  of  John  and  Maria 
(Bucher)  Porter  of  Alexandria.  She  was  of  Scotch-Irish 
and  German  origin,  her  ancestors  coming  to  this  country 
in  1755  and  settling  in  Philadelphia,  Harrisburg,  and 
Lebanon,  Pa. 

Entering  Yale  from  the  Harrisburg  Academy,  he  was 
president  of  the  Class  Football  Club  for  three  years  and 
a  member  of  the  Class  Glee  Club  in  Junior  year. 

He  spent  the  first  year  after  graduation  on  a  topograph- 
ical survey,  after  which  he  began  the  study  of  law  in 
Hollidaysburg,  Pa.  He  was  admitted  to  the  Pennsylvania 
Bar  in  1882,  and  for  the  next  six  years  practiced  at  Harris- 
burg. Removing  to  Omaha,  Nebr.,  in  May,  1888,  he  was 
for  a  time  engaged  in  an  independent  practice,  later  being 
successively  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Charlton  &  Crofoot, 
Charlton,  Crofoot  &  Hall,  Charlton  &  Hall,  and  Mont- 
gomery, Charlton  &  Hall.  From  1895  to  1905  he  devoted 
himself  exclusively  to  corporation  law  and  practice  in  the 
Federal  Courts.  In  May  of  the  latter  year  he  was  called 
to  Washington,  D.  C,  to  become  law  officer  of  the  Bureau 
of  Insular  Affairs  in  the  War  Department.  During  1909 
and  1910  he  also  served  as  lecturer  on  colonial  administra- 
tion in  the  College  of  the  Political  Sciences  at  George 
Washington  University.  In  191 1  he  was  appointed  United 
States  judge  for  the  District  of  Porto  Rico,  and  held  that 
post  for  a  little  over  a  year.  Since  January,  1913,  he  had 
practiced  law  in  San  Juan. 

Mr.  Charlton  had  written  occasionally  for  the  news- 
papers, and  had  delivered  occasional  addresses  before 
learned  and  technical  societies.  He  was  an  associate  editor 
of  the  Bulletin  de  Colonisation  Comparee  of  Brussels. 
While  living  in  Omaha,  he  was  active  in  municipal  affairs, 
being  a  director  of  the  Omaha  Public  Library,  and  a  mem- 
ber of  the  committee  on  arrangements  for  the  Trans- 
Mississippi  Library  Congress  and  chairman  of  the  advisory 
committee  of  the  Fine  Arts  Bureau  of  the  Trans-Mississippi 
and  International  Exposition,  held  at  Omaha  in  1898.  He 
was  a  member  of  the  Society  of  Colonial  Wars,  the 
American    Society    of    Political    Sciences,    the    American 


I878-I879  363 

Society  of  International  Law,  and  the  Protestant  Episcopal 
Church.  His  death  occurred  June  4,  1917,  at  Juana  Diaz, 
Porto  Rico,  following  an  operation  for  a  carbuncle. 

Mr.  Charlton  was  married  November  24,  1887,  in  Holli- 
daysburg,  to  Elizabeth  Patton,  daughter  of  John  and  Maria 
(Milliken)  Denniston,  by  whom  he  had  three  sons,  Porter, 
Robert,  and  Denniston.  Mrs.  Charlton  died  September  10, 
1902,  and  on  January  8,  1908,  he  was  married  in  Baltimore, 
Md.,  to  Helen,  daughter  of  Dr.  Alfred  Wanstall  and 
Margaret  M.  (French)  Wanstall,  who  survives  him. 


David  Daggett,  B.A.   1879 

Born  April  3,  1858,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  July  3,  1916,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 

David  Daggett  was  born  April  3,  1858,  in  New  Haven, 
Conn.,  the  son  of  David  Lewis  and  Margaret  Donaldson 
(Gibbons)  Daggett.  His  father  received  from  Yale  the 
degree  of  B.A.  in  1839  and  that  of  M.D.  four  years  later, 
and  was  for  many  years  a  leading  physician  in  New  Haven ; 
he  was  the  son  of  Leonard  Augustus  Daggett  (B.A.  1807) 
and  Jennette  (Atwater)  Daggett,  and  the  grandson  of  David 
Daggett,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1783,  who  served  as 
a  United  States  Senator,  as  Kent  professor  of  law  at  Yale, 
and  as  chief  justice  of  the  Superior  Court  of  Connecticut, 
and  upon  whom  Yale  conferred  the  degree  of  LL.D.  in 
1827.  John  Doggett,  the  founder  of  the  American  branch 
of  the  family,  came  to  Massachusetts  with  Governor  Win- 
throp  in  1630,  and  later  married  a  daughter  of  Thomas 
Mayhew,  subsequently  colonial  governor  of  Martha's  Vine- 
yard, Nantucket,  and  the  Elizabeth  Islands.  The  name 
was  changed  to  Daggett  two  generations  later.  David  L. 
Daggett  was  a  grandson  of  Eneas  Mtmson,  who  graduated 
from  Yale  in  1753  and  served  for  thirteen  years  as  pro- 
fessor of  materia  medica  and  botany  at  the  University.  His 
wife  was  a  daughter  of  William  and  Rebecca  (Donaldson) 
Gibbons  of  Wilmington,  Del.,  and  a  descendant  of  John 
Gibbons,  a  Quaker,  who  came  to  this  country  from  Wilt- 
shire, England,  in  1683,  settling  in  Chester  County,  Pa., 
where  members  of  the  family  were  prominent  in  local  and 
state  affairs  for  several  generations. 


3^4  YALE    COLLEGE 

David  Daggett  was  prepared  for  Yale  at  the  Hopkins 
Grammar  School.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Senior 
Promenade  Committee. 

After  being  engaged  in  the  iron  and  steel  business  with 
E.  S.  Wheeler  &  Company  at  Birmingham,  Conn.,  and  at 
New  Haven  for  two  years,  he  entered  the  export  commis- 
sion house  of  Guy  H.  Gardner  of  New  York  City,  and 
spent  the  next  sixteen  months  on  a  business  trip  to  Aus- 
tralia, India,  Malta,  and  England.  On  his  return  to  this 
country  he  formed  a  partnership  with  Mr.  Gardner  under 
the  name  of  G.  H.  Gardner  &  Company.  He  continued 
in  that  connection  until  1890,  during  the  latter  part  of 
this  period  being  located  in  New  Haven.  He  then  took 
a  position  with  the  Winchester  Repeating  Arms  Company 
of  that  city,  and  traveled  in  their  interests  until  1899. 
Since  that  time  he  had  been  secretary  of  the  New  Haven 
Water  Company.  He  had  also  served  as  secretary  of  the 
W^est  Haven,  Milford,  and  Branford  Water  companies  and 
as  a  trustee  of  the  New  Haven  Savings  Bank,  the  New 
Haven  Wire  Company,  E.  S.  Wheeler  &  Company,  and 
the  New  Haven  Clock  Company.  He  was  at  one  time 
an  officer  of  the  Birmingham  Rolling  Mill.  Mr.  Daggett 
was  a  leading  member  of  the  Graduates  Club  of  New 
Haven.  He  had  served  on  its  board  of  governors,  as  chair- 
man of  its  building  and  house  committees,  as  vice-president, 
and  as  president.  He  aided  in  organizing  the  Yale  Alumni 
Association  of  New  Haven,  and  later  represented  the  organ- 
ization on  the  Alumni  Advisory  Board.  He  had  also 
served  as  secretary  of  the  Yale  Committee  of  Twenty-one, 
Inc.,  charged  with  building  the  Yale  Bowl  and  developing 
the  athletic  grounds  of  the  University,  and  as  a  member 
of  the  Wright  Memorial  Committee.  He  was  a  vestryman 
of  Trinity  Protestant  Episcopal  Church,  New  Haven,  and 
president  of  the  Brooks  Club,  the  men's  club  connected 
with  it.  He  was  clerk  of  the  Pine  Orchard  Association, 
the  borough  government  of  his  summer  home. 

Mr.  Daggett  died  very  suddenly,  as  the  result  of  an 
apoplectic  stroke,  in  New  Haven,  July  3,  1916.  Interment 
was  in  the  Grove  Street  Cemetery. 

He  was  married  June  2,  1887,  in  New  Haven,  to  Annie 
Wilcox,  daughter  of  Charles  Atwater,  who  received  the 
degree  of  B.A.  at  Yale  in  1834,  and  Emilie  (Montgomery) 
A'twater.     She  survives  him  with  their  son,  David  Lewis, 


h 


1879  365 

a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1910  and  of  the  School  of 
Law  in  1913.  Mr.  Daggett  also  leaves  a  brother,  Leonard 
Mayhew  Daggett  (B.A.  1884,  LL.B.  1887).  William  Gib- 
bons Daggett,  who  received  the  degree  of  B.A.  at  Yale 
in  1880  and  that  of  M.D.  at  the  University  of  Pennsylvania 
in  1884,  and  who  died  in  1910,  was  also  a  brother  of  Mr. 
Daggett.  Mrs.  Daggett  is  a  sister  of  William  M.  Atwater 
(Ph.B.  1879)  and  a  half-sister  of  Howell  Atwater,  a  non- 
graduate  member  of  the  College  Class  of  1863. 


Newell  Avery  Eddy,  B.A.   1879 

Born  May  20,  1856,  in  Bangor,  Maine 
Died  February  28,  1917,  in  Bay  City,  Mich. 

Newell  Avery  Eddy,  son  of  Jonathan  and  Caroline 
(Bailey)  Eddy,  was  born  in  Bangor,  Maine,  May  20,  1856. 
He  was  descended  from  Samuel  Eddy,  of  Cranbrook,  Kent, 
England,  who  settled  in  Plymouth  Colony  in  1630.  His 
great-great-grandfather,  Col.  Jonathan  Eddy  of  Eddington, 
Maine,  served  with  distinction  in  the  Revolutionary  War, 
and  was  rewarded  by  two  large  land  grants,  one  at  the 
head  of  the  tidewater  on  the  Penobscot  River,  Maine,  where 
the  town  of  Eddington,  which  he  organized,  now  stands. 
The  other  land  grant  is  the  present  city  of  Columbus,  Ohio. 
His  father,  who  was  engaged  in  business  in  Bangor  as  a 
lumber  merchant,  was  the  son  of  Ware  and  Nancy  (Clapp) 
Eddy.  His  mother's  parents  were  Amos  and  Sally  (Bal- 
lard) Bailey. 

His  preparatory  training  was  received  at  Phillips  Acad- 
emy, Andover,  Mass.    In  college  he  belonged  to  Linonia. 

Early  in  1880,  after  spending  some  time  at  home,  Mr. 
Eddy  went  to  southern  Florida,  where  he  studied  and  made 
collections  in  ornithology  and  oology  for  several  months. 
He  made  Bangor  his  home  for  the  next  few  years,  devoting 
his  attention  to  study  and  travel.  In  May,  1885,  he  removed 
from  Bangor  to  Bay  City,  Mich.,  where  the  remainder  of 
his  life  was  spent.  There  he  became  engaged  in  the  lumber 
and  real  estate  business  under  his  own  name,  continuing 
his  interests  in  that  direction  until  his  death.  Among  the 
companies  with  which  he  had  been  connected  as  an  officer 


3^6  YALE    COLLEGE 

were  the  Eddy  Brothers  Company,  the  First  National  and 
Bay  County  Savings  banks,  the  General  Machinery  Com- 
pany, the  Opera  House  Company,  the  Elm  Lawn  Cemetery 
Association,  the  Smalley  Motor  Company,  the  Penobscot 
Mining  Company,  the  Piatt  Mining  Company,  the  Windiate 
Building  Company,  the  Eddy  Investment  Company,  the 
Lake  Transit  Company,  the  Eddy- Shaw  Transit  Company, 
and  the  Mershon-Eddy- Parker  Company.  Mr.  Eddy  served 
on  the  Bay  City  School  Board  for  some  years.  He  was 
a  member  of  the  American  Association  for  the  Advance- 
ment of  Science  and  the  Audubon  Society,  and  was  con- 
sidered an  authority  on  bird  life  in  North  America,  having 
one  of  the  largest  collections  of  birds  in  the  state  of 
Michigan,  all  of  which  he  had  collected  and  mounted  him- 
self. For  a  long  time  he  had  assisted  in  the  publication 
of  works  on  Michigan  birds,  and  he  had  made  reports  on 
the  same  subject,  as  well  as  contributing  frequently  to 
ornithological  journals.  At  the  time  of  his  death  he  was 
the  representative  of  the  Smithsonian  Institution  in  the 
Middle  West.  For  a  number  of  years  he  annually  made 
collecting  and  hunting  trips  in  various  parts  of  this  country. 

His  death  occurred  suddenly  February  ,28,  191 7,  'at 
his  home  in  Bay  City,  as  the  result  of  an  attack  of  acute 
indigestion  and  heart  failure.  Interment  was  in  Elm  Lawn 
Cemetery. 

Mr.  Eddy  was  married  February  9,  1880,  in  Bangor,  to 
Marianna  McRuer,  daughter  of  Edward  Mann  Field  (B.A. 
Bowdoin  1845,  M.D.  Jefferson  Medical  College  1849)  and 
Sally  (McRuer)  Field.  They  had  six  children:  Newell 
Avery,  Jr.  (Ph.B.  1904)  ;  May  Field,  who  was  married 
June  14,  1905,  to  Harry  Fay  Chapin  of  Bay  City;  Laura 
Parker,  the  wife  of  John  McCabe  of  Chicago,  111. ;  Donald 
McRuer,  who  graduated  from  the  Scientific  School  in  1912; 
Charles  Fremont,  2d  (Ph.B.  1917),  and  Sally  McRuer. 
The  eldest  son  is  the  Class  Boy  of  1879.  Mr.  Eddy  is 
survived  by  his  wife,  six  children,  and  two  grandchildren. 
His  Yale  relatives  include  his  cousins,  Edwin  M.  Eddy 
(Ph.B.  1899)  and  Stanley  L.  Eddy  (Ph.B.  1908). 


i879  367 


Howard  Dunlap  Newton,  B. A.   1879 

Born  November  i8,  1857,  in  Norwich,  N.  Y. 
Died  November  21,  1916,  in  New  York  City- 
Howard  Dunlap  Newton,  whose  parents  were  Isaac 
Sprague  Newton  (B.A.  1848)  and  Jane  Campbell  (Dunlap) 
Newton,  was  born  in  Norwich,  N.  Y.,  November  18,  1857. 
He  was  the  grandson  of  William  Newton  of  Salem,  Conn., 
whose  father,  Asahel  Newton,  fought  in  the  Revolution, 
and  Lois  (Butler)  Newton,  the  latter  being  the  daughter 
of  Deacon  Richard  Butler,  the  niece  of  Seth  Sage  (B.A. 
1768),  and  a  descendant  of  Lieut.  Charles  Butler  and  Capt. 
Solomon  Sage,  both  of  whom  were  Revolutionary  soldiers. 
The  earliest  member  of  the  Newton  family  in  this  country 
was  Thomas  Newton,  who  came  from  England  to  Con- 
necticut prior  to  1640  and  married  Joan  Smith,  daughter 
of  Richard  Smith,  who  had  settled  in  Narragansett  before 
1639.  Howard  D.  Newton's  mother  was  of  Scotch  descent, 
her  father's  family  having  originated  in  Argyleshire  and 
settled  in  Cherry  Valley,  N.  Y.,  about  1740.  Among  her 
ancestors  who  served  in  the  Revolutionary  War  were  John 
Burkett  and  John  Dunlap.  Mrs.  Newton  was  the  daughter 
of  Robert  and  Hannah  (Burkett)  Dunlap;  she  died  Decem- 
ber 7,  1864,  and  her  husband  later  married  Jane,  daughter 
of  Harvey  and  Tamer  (Parks)  Newton. 

Howard  D.  Newton  was  fitted  for  college  at  the  Hopkins 
Grammar  School  in  New  Haven,  and  in  his  Freshman  year 
was  given  a  third  prize  in  mathematics.  His  Junior  appoint- 
ment was  an  Oration,  and  he  received  a  Dissertation  at 
Commencement. 

Returning  to  Norwich  immediately  after  graduation,  he 
was  employed  for  eighteen  months  in  the  National  Bank. 
In  January,  1881,  he  began  the  study  of  law  in  his  father's 
office.  Two  years  later  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar  of 
New  York  State,  and  he  had  since  practiced  in  Norwich, 
being  associated  with  his  father  until  the  latter's  death  in 
1889.  He  was  for  a  long  time  attorney  for  the  New  York, 
Ontario  &  Western  Railway.  He  was  interested  in  a  num- 
ber of  business  concerns,  serving  for  some  years  as  presi- 
dent of  the  National  Bank  of  Norwich,  the  Sherburne 
National  Bank,  and  the  Norwich  Water  Works.  After 
the   death   of   his    father-in-law,   Mr.    Martin,   the   David 


3^8  YALE    COLLEGE 

Maydole  Hammer  Company  was  largely  in  the  charge  of 
Mr.  Newton  and  his  wife.  He  was  a  trustee  of  the  Follett 
Law  Library,  the  Young  Men's  Christian  Association,  and 
the  First  Congregational  Church.  The  surroundings  of  his 
home  town  show  evidence  of  his  active  interest  in  reforest- 
ing and  landscape  work. 

He  died  at  the  General  Memorial  Hospital  in  New  York 
City,  November  21,  1916,  after  an  illness  of  several  months 
due  to  carcinoma.  He  was  buried  in  Mount  Hope  Cemetery 
at  Norwich. 

His  marriage  took  place  November  18,  1885,  in  that 
town,  to  Jane  Vernette,  daughter  of  Cyrus  B.  and  Ann 
Vernette  (Maydole)  Martin.  Their  children  were:  Anna 
Martin,  who  graduated  from  Wellesley  in  1909  and  was 
married  August  12,  1913,  to  Charles  Talbot  Porter,  an 
instructor  at  Yale,  where  he  received  the  degree  of  Ph.B. 
in  1907  and  that  of  M.E.  in  1913;  Margaret  Dunlap  (B.A. 
Wellesley  1911)  ;  Lawrence  Howard,  who  died  February 
5,  1900;  Jean  Maydole  (B.A.  Wellesley  1916),  and  Eleanor 
Butler  (B.A.  Wellesley  1917).  Surviving  Mr.  Newton  are 
his  wife,  four  children,  a  brother,  Isaac  Burkett  Newton 
(B.A.  1883),  a  sister,  a  half-brother,  Edward  Payson  New- 
ton (B.A.  1897),  and  a  half-sister.  He  was  a  nephew  of 
Hubert  A.  Newton  (B.A.  1850),  for  many  years  professor 
of  mathematics  at  Yale,  and  Homer  G.  Newton  (B.A. 
1859)  ;  a  cousin  of  William  L.  Newton  (B.A.  1893),  and 
an  uncle  of  Reuben  Jeffery,  Jr.,  who  graduated  from  the 
College  in  191 1  and  from  the  School  of  Law  in  1914,  and 
of  Burkett  D.  Newton  (B.A.  1914). 


John  Theodore  Wentworth,  B.A.   1879 

Born  January  13,  1854,  at  Saratoga  Springs,  N.  Y. 
Died  September  19,  1916,  in  Racine,  Wis. 

John  Theodore  Wentworth  was  a  descendant  of  William 
Wentworth,  an  early  settler  in  New  Haven  Colony,  and 
was  born  January  13,  1854,  at  Saratoga  Springs,  N.  Y. 
His  father,  John  Theodore  Wentworth,  graduated  from 
Union  College  in  1846,  studied  law  at  Saratoga  Springs, 
arid  immediately  after  his  marriage  in  1852  went  West, 
first  to  Chicago,  111.,  where  he  was  connected  with  a  news- 


i879  369 

paper,  and  then  to  Geneva  (now  Lake  Geneva),  Wis.,  where 
he  practiced  law;  in  1871  he  was  elected  clerk  of  the 
Circuit  Court,  and  the  family  moved  to  Elkhorn,  Wis.,  the 
county  seat;  in  1875  he  became  judge  of  the  First  Judicial 
Circuit,  and  removed  with  his  family  to  Racine,  Wis.  Mr. 
Wentworth  was  the  son  of  John  Wentworth,  who  went 
from  Boston  to  Saratoga  Springs  early  in  the  nineteenth 
century,  and  Mary  (Brown)  Wentworth,  and  a  descendant 
of  John  Wentworth,  the  founder  of  an  Indian  Charter 
School  at  Hanover,  N.  H.,  in  1769.  His  wife,  Frances 
(McDonnell)  Wentworth,  was  the  daughter  of  Thomas 
McDonnell  of  Portaferry,  Ireland,  who  came  to  America 
toward  the  close  of  the  eighteenth  century,  married  Frances 
Halsey  of  New  York,  and  soon  settled  at  Saratoga  Springs. 

Their  son  spent  the  first  seventeen  years  of  his  life  at 
Lake  Geneva.  After  studying  for  a  year  at  the  Elkhorn 
(Wis.)  High  School,  he  came  to  New  Haven  to  work  for 
the  New  Haven  Clock  Company.  In  1872  he  entered  the 
Hopkins  Grammar  School,  and,  after  spending  three  years 
there,  returned  to  the  West,  and  matriculated  at  Beloit 
College.  He  completed  his  Sophomore  year  at  that  insti- 
tution, joining  the  Yale  Class  of  1879  in  the  fall  of  1877. 
As  a  member  of  Linonia,  he  took  a  prominent  part  in  the 
various  debates  during  his  two  years  at  Yale.  He  received 
a  First  Dispute  appointment  at  Commencement. 

He  then  studied  law  in  the  offices  of  Sloan,  Stevens  & 
Morris  in  Madison,  Wis.,  being  admitted  to  the  bar  in 
April,  1881.  The  larger  part  of  his  life  was  spent  in 
Racine,  although  he  lived  in  Colorado  for  two  or  three 
years  on  account  of  his  health,  there  being  for  a  time 
engaged  in  mining  and  afterwards  associated  with  a  law 
firm  at  Silverton;  spent  two  years  in  Washington,  D.  C, 
as  secretary  to  Judge  Schoonmaker  of  the  Interstate  Com- 
merce Commission,  and  was  in  Chicago  for  a  similar  length 
of  time,  being  at  first  connected  with  the  legal  department 
of  J.  V.  Farwell  &  Company  and  later  with  the  law  firm 
of  Flower,  Smith  &  Musgrave.  For  one  year  he  was 
associated  in  practice  with  David  H.  Flett  (B.A.  Oberlin 
1875,  LL.B.  Wisconsin  1880).  He  then  formed  a  partner- 
ship with  his  father,  continuing  as  a  member  of  the  firm 
of  Wentworth  &  Wentworth  until  the  death  of  his  father 
in  1893.  Thereafter  he  conducted  an  independent  practice. 
He  was  interested  in  political  reforms,  and  was  especially 


370  YALE    COLLEGE 

active  in  establishing  the  AustraUan  ballot  system  in  Wis- 
consin. He  served  from  January,  1902,  until  19 16  as  court 
commissioner  for  Racine  County,  and  was  for  five  years 
a  justice  of  the  peace,  acting  in  the  latter  capacity  until 
the  work  of  the  Justice  Courts  was  largely  supplanted  by 
the  Municipal  Court  of  Racine  County,  the  bill  for  which 
he  mainly  drafted.  Mr.  Wentworth  had  read  widely,  not 
only  in  law  but  in  most  subjects  of  importance.  While 
engaged  in  his  work  for  the  Interstate  Commerce  Com- 
mission, he  published  a  useful  book,  entitled  "Practice 
before  the  Interstate  Commerce  Board."  At  forty-five 
he  acquired  the  art  of  shorthand  writing,  and  in  his  fiftieth 
year  took  up  the  study  of  both  Spanish  and  French,  learning 
to  read  easily  in  both  of  these  languages.  He  attended  the 
First  Presbyterian  Church  of  Racine,  and  was  active  in 
the  work  of  its  men's  Bible  class. 

Although  his  health  had  always  been  poor,  he  was  able 
to  give  his  attention  to  his  legal  work  until  1916.  In  recent 
years  he  had  largely  withdrawn  from  practice,  and  devoted 
himself  -to  making  abstracts  of  title.  His  death  occurred 
September  19,  1916,  at  St.  Mary's  Hospital,  Racine,  as  the 
result  of  a  nervous  breakdown.  Interment  was  in  the 
Mound  Cemetery  in  that  city. 

Mr.  Wentworth  had  never  married.  He  is  survived  by 
his  mother  and  two  sisters.  His  brother,  Thomas  McDon- 
nell Wentworth,  received  from  Yale  the  degree  of  B.A. 
post  obit,  in  1882. 


Frank  Hamilton  Ayer,  B.A.   1880 

Born  June  21,  1857,  in  Nashua,  N.  H. 
Died  January  13,  1917,  in  Nashua,  N.  H. 

Frank  Hamilton  Ayer  was  born  June  21,  1857,  in  Nashua, 
N.  H.,  the  son  of  Francis  Brown  Ayer  (M.D.  Jefferson 
Medical  College  1848)  and  Anne  Maria  (Baldwin)  Ayer. 
His  father,  who  practiced  medicine  in  Laconia,  N.  H.,  for 
some  years,  was  the  son  of  John  and  Judith  (McCutcheon) 
Ayer,  and  a  grandson  of  John  Ayer,  an  ensign  in  the 
Revolutionary  ,War,  who  lived  first  at  Pembroke,  N.  H., 
and  later  at  Ticonderoga.  The  McCutcheon  family,  a 
branch  of  the  Macleods,  came  with  a  colony  to  London- 


I 879-1880  371 

derry,  N.  H.,  about  17 19,  later  removing  to  Pembroke. 
Frank  H.  Ayer's  great-grandfather,  Frederick  McCutcheon, 
served  as  a  private  in  the  Revolution.  His  mother,  whose 
parents  were  Josephus  Baldwin,  the  first  mayor  of  Nashua, 
and  Nancy  (Blan chard)  Baldwin,  was  descended  from 
Henry  Baldwin,  who  emigrated  to  America  from  Devon- 
shire, England,  about  1630,  settling  at  North  Woburn, 
Mass. 

His  preparation  for  college  was  received  at  Phillips 
Academy,  Andover,  Mass.,  and  under  a  private  tutor  in 
Nashua.  Fie  was  given  a  Second  Colloquy  appointment  in 
both  Junior  and  Senior  years. 

Soon  after  graduation  Mr.  Ayer  became  connected  with 
the  Nashua  Bobbin  &  Shuttle  Company.  He  was  made 
president  and  treasurer  of  the  concern  in  1885,  but  six 
years  later  resigned  to  take  the  position  of  Eastern  repre- 
sentative of  the  Ironton  Door  &  Manufacturing  Company 
of  Ironton,  Ohio.  He  retained  that  connection  until  1905, 
and  had  since  been  engaged  in  the  real  estate  business  in 
Nashua.  Mr.  Ayer  was  an  enthusiastic  golfer,  and  built 
the  first  course  in  the  state  of  New  Hampshire.  He  was 
a  supporter  of  the  Nashua  Unitarian  Church. 

He  died  very  suddenly  January  13,  19 17,  in.  Nashua,  as 
the  result  of  ursemic  poisoning.  Interment  was  in  the 
family  mausoleum  at  Bristol,  N.  H. 

He  was  married  January  26,  1887,  in  Manchester,  N.  H., 
to  Ellen  Frances,  daughter  of  Orison  and  Anne  Maria 
(Clark)  Batchelder.  They  had  no  children.  Mr.  Ayer  is 
survived  by  three  aunts  and  several  cousins.  His  wife  died 
May  17,  1910. 


Asa  John  Farwell,  B.A.   1880 

Born  July  27,  1857,  in  Hartford,  Conn. 
Died  September  i,  1916,  in  Hartford,  Conn. 

Asa  John  Farwell,  whose  parents  were  John  Isham  and 
Emma  Jane  (Church)  Farwell,  was  born  in  Hartford, 
Conn.,  July  2j,  1857.  His  father  was  the  son  of  Asa  and 
Eliza  (Isham)  Farwell,  and  his  mother's  parents  were 
Samuel  and  Sarah  Church.  He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at 
the   Hartford   Public   High   School,   and   before   entering 


372  YALE    COLLEGE 

college  spent  a  year  in  the  office  of  the  town  and  city 
treasurer  of  Hartford.  His  Junior  appointment  was  a 
Second  Colloquy. 

After  spending  a  year  in  Hartford,  Mr.  Farwell  entered 
the  Harvard  Medical  School  in  the  fall  of  1881,  but  at 
the  end  of  a  year  he  was  compelled  to  give  up  his  intention 
of  becoming  a  physician.  For  several  years  he  served  as 
bookkeeper  for  Lewis  Brothers  &  Company  in  Boston, 
Mass.,  on  June  i,  1885,  being  transferred  to  their  New 
York  office.  Two  years  later,  having  passed  a  Civil  Service 
examination,  he  was  appointed  to  a  clerkship  in  the  naval 
office  of  the  New  York  Customs  House,  where  he  was 
employed  until  1889.  In  June  of  that  year  he  returned  to 
Boston,  and  until  1897  was  a  bookkeeper  for  the  Boston 
Safe  Deposit  &  Trust  Company.  His  health  failed  about 
this  time,  and  for  the  next  six  years  he  lived  quietly  in  Lynn, 
Mass.  In  October,  1903,  he  took  a  position  with  Harper 
&  Brothers  in  New  York  City,  and  while  in  their  employ 
made  his  home  in  Brooklyn.  He  was  afterwards  connected 
with  the  V/estchester  &  Bronx  Title. &  Mortgage  Guaranty 
Company  of  White  Plains,  but  in  191 1  he  developed  tuber- 
culosis, and  went  to  Hartford,  where  the  remainder  of  his 
life  was  spent.  He  died  there  at  the  home  of  his  half- 
brother,  September  i,  1916,  and  was  buried  in  Spring  Grove 
Cemetery. 

He  was  unmarried.  Surviving  him  are  a  sister  and  a 
half-brother. 


Cadwalader  Edwards  Linthictim,  B.A.   1880 

Born  November  11,  1858,  near  Millersville,  Aid. 
Died  March  22,  1917,  in  Gaithersburg,  Md. 

Cadwalader  Edwards  Linthicum,  son  of  John  Linthicum, 
a  planter,  and  Matilda  (Dare)  Linthicum,  was  born  on  a 
farm  near  Millersville,  Md.,  November  11,  1858.  His 
father's  parents  w^ere  John  and  Rebecca  (White)  Lin- 
thicum, and  his  mother  was  the  daughter  of  Nathaniel 
and  Matilda  (Hodgkin)  Dare.  The  Linthicums  and  Cad- 
walader s  came  to  this  country  from  Wales  about  1776, 
settling  at  Annapolis,  Md.,  and  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  and  mem- 
bers of  both  families  participated  in  the  War  of  1812.  The 
Dare  family  came  from  Ireland  some  time  after  1812.  and 
the  Edwards  family  emigrated  from  Scotland  a  little  later. 


i88o-i88i  373 

■  He  received  his  preparatory  training  at  the  Millersville 
Academy,  and  in  1876  entered  St.  John's  College  at  Annap- 
olis, Md.,  where  he  was  graduated  with  the  degree  of  B.A. 
in  1879.  He  spent  only  Senior  year  with  the  Yale  Class 
of  1880. 

Mr.  Linthicum  taught  languages  and  mathematics  in 
New  Windsor  College  at  New  Windsor,  Md.,  from  1880 
to  1882,  and  then  spent  two  years  in  Baltimore  looking 
after  the  business  affairs  of  an  invalid  uncle.  In  1884  he 
went  to  Chicago^  111.,  and  took  a  position  as  bookkeeper 
with  the  PVa'nklin  Mills  Company.  He  was  appointed  to 
a  Fellowship  in  mathematics  and  civil  eng'ineering  at  Cor- 
nell University  in  1885,  and  spent  the  next  three  years 
there  as  a  graduate  student  and  instructor,  receiving  the 
degree  of  Doctor  of  Philosophy  cum  laude  in  1888.  With 
the  exception  of  the  year  1890-91,  which  he  spent  in  the 
South  for  his  health,  he  taught  mathematics,  Latin,  and 
Greek  at  various  preparatory  schools  from  1888  until  1893, 
being  connected  successively  with  the  Peekskill  (N.  Y.) 
Military  Academy,  the  New  York  Military  Academy  at 
Cornwall,  N.  Y.,  and  the  Academy  of  the  New  Church  in 
Philadelphia,  Pa.  From  1893  to  1895  he  was  engaged  in 
private  tutoring  in  New  York  City,  afterwards  conducting 
a  real  estate  business  in  that  city  for  some  years.  Mr.  Lin- 
thicum was  a  member  of  St.  Paul's  Methodist  Church  of 
Millersville,  Md. 

I  His  death  occurred  March  22,  1917,  at  the  home  of  his 
sister  in  Gaithersburg,  Md.,  where  he  had  been  living  since 
March,  1914.  He  had  suffered  from  locomotor  ataxia  for 
four  years,  and  this  disease  ultimately  caused  his  death. 
Interment  was  in  Loudon  Park  Cemetery  at  Baltimore. 
He  was  married  in  that  city,  December  28,  1898,  to  Bessie, 
daughter  of  Jacob  and  Carrie  (Fine)  Dreffuse  of  Baltimore. 
Mrs.  Linthicum  died  October  18,  1899.  They  had  no 
ch 
; 


children.     Surviving  Mr.  Linthicum  are  five  sisters. 


John  Caldwell  Coleman,  B.A.   1881 

Born  August  25,  1858,  in  New  York  City 
Died  February   17,   1917,   in  New  York  City 

John  Caldwell  Coleman  was  born  August  25,   1858,  in 
New  York  City,  the  son  of   Emerson  Coleman,  a  cotton 


374  YALE    COLLEGE 

merchant,  who  was  active  in  civic  work  during  the  Civil- 
War,  and  Frances  Ann  (Coleman)  Coleman.  His  father's 
parents  were  Eleazer  and  Anne  (Searle)  Coleman,  and  his 
mother,  a  cousin  of  her  husband,  was  the  daughter  of 
Eliphalet  and  Martha  (Kelly)  Coleman.  His  ancestors, 
Thomas  Coleman  and  John  Searle,  came  to  America  from 
England  in  1630,  settling  in  Massachusetts,  the  former 
becoming  an  owner  of  land  at  Nantucket.  He  was  also 
descended  from  the  Pomeroys,  Edwards,  Clarks,  and 
Strongs  of  Northampton.  One  of  his  ancestors  gave 
money  to  start  the  then  struggling  Harvard  College.  Others 
fought  in  the  Colonial  Wars,  one  going  on  the  Cape  Breton 
expedition.  His  great-great-grandfather,  Lemuel  Coleman, 
served  as  an  officer  with  a  Massachusetts  regiment  during 
the  Revolution. 

His  preparation  for  college  was  received  at  a  private 
school  in  New  York  City  and  at  Williston  Seminary,  East- 
hampton,  Mass.  He  received  two  first  prizes  in  English 
composition  in  Sophomore  year  and  a  second  prize  at 
Junior  Exhibition,  and  he  also  won  a  second  Kappa  Sigma 
Epsilon  prize  in  oratory.  His  appointments  were  Second 
Disputes,  and  he  was  one  of  the  speakers  at  Commence- 
ment. He  was  an  editor  of  the  C  our  ant  in  1879-80  and 
of  the  Yale  Literary  Magazine  in  Senior  year,  was  elected 
to  Chi  Delta  Theta,  served  as  treasurer  of  Linonia,  and 
was  a  member  of  the  Senior  Debating  Society  and  of  the 
Track  Team.  He  was  active  in  religious  work,  in  Senior 
year  superintending  the  Bethany  Sunday  School. 

Mr.  Coleman  received  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Laws 
from  Columbia  in  1883,  having  spent  the  two  years  follow- 
ing his  graduation  from  Yale  in  the  study  of  law.  He 
was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  March,  1883,  and  from  that 
time  until  1887  was  a  clerk  in  the  office  of  Burnett  &  Whit- 
ney in  New^  York  City.  During  the  next  few  years  he  con- 
ducted an  independent  practice,  but  later  became  associated 
with  Mr.  George  W.  Thomas,  and  continued  in  partnership 
with  him  until  his  death,  the  firm  name  being  Coleman  & 
Thomas.  In  1902-3  he  served  as  deputy  attorney-general 
for  the  state  of  New  York.  Mr.  Coleman  voluntarily 
gave  much  time  to  public  service.  He  moved  to  the 
west  side  of  New  York  in  1884,  and  there  was  hardly 
an  improvement  in  that  part  of  the  city  with  which  he 
was  not  identified.     He  joined  the  West  End  Association 


i»«i  375 

in  1885,  and  for  many  years  was  its  legal  counsel.  In  1891 
he  was  elected  vice-president,  and  continued  in  that  capacity 
until  19 1 3,  when  he  assumed  the  presidency  of  the  organi- 
zation. He  held  that  office  until  his  death.  He  early  joined 
the  Union  League,  and  served  on  its  membership  and 
library  committees,  and  he  had  been  president  of  the  Nine- 
teenth District  Assembly  Club,  the  Williston  Alumni  Asso- 
ciation of  New  York  City,  and  the  Round  Table,  and  had 
held  office  in  the  Order  of  Founders  and  Patriots  of 
America.  He  had  been  a  member  of  the  Madison  Square 
Presbyterian  Church  of  New  York  City  since  he  was  ten 
years  of  age,  and  was  superintendent  of  its  Sunday  school 
for  ten  years. 

His  death  occurred  February  17,  1917,  at  his  home  in 
New  York  City,  from  heart  failure,  after  an  illness  of  a 
few  hours.  He  was  buried  in  Evergreen  Cemetery  at 
New  Haven,  Conn.  His  classmate,  Rev.  Joseph  Dunn 
Burrell,  was  one  of  the  officiating  clergymen  at  the 
funeral  services  on  February  20,  assisting  Rev.  Charles  H. 
Parkhurst. 

Mr.  Coleman  was  married  in  New  Haven,  June  25,  1884, 
to  Julia  Rose,  daughter  of  Alexander  and  Susan  Gold 
(Ufford)  McAlister,  granddaughter  of  Rev.  Hezekiah 
Gold  Ufford,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1806,  and  sister 
of  Alexander  U.  McAUster  (Ph.B.  1866).  She  survives 
him  with  a  son,  McAlister,  who  graduated  from  Columbia 
in  1909,  and  a  daughter,  Frances  Emerson. 


Everett  Warren,  B.A.   1881 

Born  August  27,  1859,  in  Scranton,  Pa. 
Died  August  4,  1916,  at  Lake  Placid,  N.  Y. 

Everett  Warren  was  born  in  Scranton,  Pa.,  August  27, 
1859,  being  a  direct  descendant  of  Richard  Warren,  who 
came  from  England  in  the  Mayflower.  His  great-great- 
grandfather, Isaac  Warren,  himself  a  sergeant  in  the  Revo- 
lution, was  a  cousin  of  Gen.  Joseph  Warren.  His  father, 
Harris  Franklyn  Warren,  who  was  for  some  years  previous 
to  his  death  in  1905  chief  accountant  of  the  Delaware, 
Lackawanna  &  Western  Railroad,  was  the  son  of  Isaac 
and  Leonora  (Perkins)  Warren.     His  mother  was  Marion 


376  YALE    COLLEGE 

Margery,  daughter  of  Charles  N.  and  Margery  (Thomas) 
Griffin. 

For  two  years  before  entering  Yale  he  was  a  clerk  in 
the  law  office  of  Hand  &  Post  in  Scranton,  the  members 
of  this  firm  being  Alfred  Hand  and  Isaac  J.  Post,  graduates 
of  the  College  in  1857  and  i860,  respectively,  and  at  the 
same  time  he  studied  privately  under  George  F.  Bentley 
(B.A.  1873).  Previously  he  had  attended  the  high  school 
and  Merrill's  Academy  in  Scranton.  In  his  Sophomore 
year  at  Yale  he  was  the  recipient  of  a  second  prize  in 
English  composition.  His  scholarship  appointments  were 
Dissertations,  and  he  was  a  member  of  Linonia  and,  in 
Senior  year,  of  the  News  board. 

After  graduation  he  read  law  in  the  office  of  E.  N. 
Willard,  subsequently  a  judge  of  the  Superior  Court  of 
Pennsylvania,  with  whom  he  formed  a  partnership  after 
his  admission  to  the  bar  in  September,  1882.  The  firm 
was  known  as  Willard  &  Warren  until  1892,  when  its  name 
was  changed  to  Willard,  Warren  &  Knapp,  this,  on  the 
death  of  Mr.  Willard  in  1910,  becoming  Warren,  Knapp, 
O'Malley  &  Hill.  Mr.  Warren  was  the  active  trial  lawyer 
for  the  firm,  frequently  being  engaged  in  important  litiga- 
tion for  the  leading  companies  and  corporations  of  north- 
eastern Pennsylvania  and  taking  a  prominent  part  in  the 
solution  of  the  many  important  problems  that  have  arisen 
during  recent  years  in  the  anthracite  coal  district.  He 
had  served  as  executor  and  trustee  of  several  estates. 

He  was  a  director  in  the  County  Savings  Bank,  the 
Scranton  Trust  Company,  the  Bangor  &  Portland  Railway 
Company,  and  the  Pennsylvania  Coal  Company.  He  had 
been  active  in  politics,  not  only  serving  as  a  delegate  to  a 
number  of  state  and  national  Republican  conventions,  but 
acting  upon  county  committees  and  giving  personal  service 
for  political  betterment.  He  aided  in  organizing  the 
Pennsylvania  branch  of  the  National  League  of  Republican 
Clubs,  and  twice  held  the  office  of  president  of  the  State 
Republican  League.  Mr.  Warren  joined  the  National 
Guard  of  Pennsylvania  in  1881  as  a  private  in  Company  A, 
Thirteenth  Regiment,  in  which  he  later  served  as  sergeant- 
major  and  as  adjutant.  For  five  years  he  was  judge  advo- 
cate of  the  Third  Brigade,  retiring  with  the  rank  of  major 
in  1891,  after  having  declined  the  position  of  judge  advocate 
general.     In  1889  he  published  a  pamphlet,    "The  Powers 


i88i-i882  377 

and  Duties  of  the  Military  in  Times  of  Riot  and  Insurrec- 
tion." Since  1886  he  had  been  a  vestryman  of  St.  Luke's 
Protestant  Episcopal  Church,  and  he  had  invariably 
attended  diocesan  conventions.  He  had  made  several  trips 
abroad. 

His  death  occurred  August  4,  191 6,  at  his  summer  home 
at  Lake  Placid,  N.  Y.  Burial  was  in  Forest  Hill  Cemetery 
at  Scranton. 

He  was  married  in  that  city,  May  31,  1883,  to  Ellen  H., 
daughter  of  E.  N.  and  Ellen  C.  Willard.  She  survives 
him  with  their  three  children,  Marion  Margery,  who  was 
married  April  11,  1907,  to  Worthington  Scranton,  a  gradu- 
ate of  the  College  in  1898  and  of  the  Harvard  Law  School 
in  1901 ;  Dorothy  Josephine,  the  wife  of  Nathaniel  H. 
Cowdrey  (B.A.  1898),  and  Edward  Willard,  a  member  of 
the  College  Class  of  1918.  Rev.  Dr.  Israel  Perkins  Warren 
(B.A.  1838)  was  an  uncle  of  Mr.  Warren  and  Stanley 
Perkins  Warren  (B.A.  1869,  M.D.  1874),  a  cousin. 


Buriiside  Foster,  B.A.   1882 

Born  May  7,  1861,  in  Worcester,  Mass. 
Died  June  13,  1917,  in  St.  Paul,  Minn. 

Burnside  Foster  was  born  in  Worcester,  Mass.,  May  7, 
1861,  his  parents  being  Dwight  and  Henrietta  Perkins 
(Baldwin)  Foster.  His  father  was  the  son  of  Alfred 
Dwight  Foster  (B.A.  Harvard  1819)  and  Lydia  (Stiles) 
Foster,  and  the  grandson  of  Dwight  Foster  (B.A.  Brown 
1774),  a  member  of  Congress,  chief  justice  of  the  Massa- 
chusetts Court  of  Common  Pleas,  a  United  States  Senator, 
and  a  member  of  the  Constitutional  Convention  of  1779. 
He  graduated  from  Yale  College  in  1848,  and  after  study- 
ing in  the  Harvard  Law  School  and  elsewhere,  practiced 
for  many  years  in  Massachusetts,  serving  as  attorney  gen- 
eral of  that  state  from  1861  to  1864  and  as  a  judge  of  the 
Supreme  Court  from  1866  to  1871 ;  Yale  conferred  the 
honorary  degree  of  LL.D.  upon  him  in  1871.  His  wife 
was  the  daughter  of  Roger  Sherman  Baldwin  (B.A.  181 1, 
LL.D.  Trinity  1844  and  Yale  1845),  governor  of  Connect- 
icut in  1844  and  1.845  and  a  member  of  the  United  States 
Senate  for  several  years,  and  Emily   (Perkins)   Baldwin; 


37^  YALE    COLLEGE 

granddaughter  of  Simeon  Baldwin  (B.A.  1781),  and  great- 
granddaughter  of  Roger  Sherman,  a  signer  of  the  Declara- 
tion of  Independence,  who  received  an  honorary  M.A.  at 
Yale  in  1768  and  who  was  the  fifth  treasurer  of  the  Uni- 
versity. Burnside  Foster  was  also  descended  from  Regi- 
nald Foster,  who  came  to  Ipswich,  Mass.,  from  England 
in  1638,  and  from  John  Baldwin,  who  settled  in  New  Haven 
Colony  in  1636.  His  ancestors  included  Brig.-Gen.  Joseph 
Dwight,  a  member  of  the  Colonial  Council  from  1733  to 
1 75 1,  and  second  in  command  in  the  assault  on  Louisburg 
in  1745,  Judge  Jedidiah  Foster,  Harvard  1744,  and  Eben- 
ezer  Baldwin,  a  graduate  of  Yale  in  1763. 

His  preparatory  training  was  received  at  the  Boston  Latin 
School  and  Hopkinson's  Private  School,  Boston,  and  at 
Phillips-Andover.  He  received  third  prizes  in  English  com- 
position and  declamation  Sophomore  year,  and  in  Senior 
year  was  given  honorable  mention  in  the  contest  for  the 
Scott  prize  in  German. 

Entering  upon  the  study  of  medicine  at  Harvard  after 
his  graduation  from  Yale,  he'  received  the  degree  of  M.D. 
there  in  1886.  On  August  i,  1885,  he  began  an  eighteen 
months'  hospital  service  in  the  Massachusetts  General  Hos- 
pital in  Boston.  After  completing  his  work  there,  he  spent 
some  months  in  study  in  Vienna  and  Dublin,  opening  an 
office  in  St.  Paul,  Minn.,  on  his  return  to  this  country  in 
1888.  He  served  for  some  years  as  professor  of  dermatol- 
ogy and  syphilology  and  lecturer  on  the  history  of  medicine 
at  the  University  of  Minnesota,  was  editor  of  the  St.  Paul 
Medical  Journal  from  1899  until  his  death,  and  was  the 
author  of  a  number  of  articles  appearing  in  other  medical 
journals.  He  was  a  member  of  the  American  Medical 
Association  and  the  Minnesota  State  Medical  Society,  and 
a  Fellow  of  the  American  Dermatological  Association,  and 
was  at  one  time  president  of  the  Ramsey  County  Medical 
Society.  For  two  years  he  served  on  the  St.  Paul  Library 
Board.  In  April,  1909,  he  delivered  an  address  before  the 
Association  of  Life-insurance  Presidents  of  New  York 
City,  entitled  "A  Suggestion  Concerning  the  Increased 
Longevity  of  Life-insurance  Pohcy-Holders,"  which 
attracted  wide-spread  attention. 

He  died  in  St.  Paul,  June  13,  1917,  after  an  illness  of 
three  months  due  to  tumor  of  the  brain.  Interment  was  in 
Oakland  Cemetery  in  that  city. 


-i882  379 

He  was  married  January  i,  1894,  in  St.  Paul,  to  Sophie 
Vernon,  daughter  of  John  Henry  Hammond,  who  attended 
Bethany  College,  Virginia,  for  a  time,  and  who  served 
throughout  the  Civil  War,  ranking  as  a  brigadier-general 
at  its  close,  and  Sophie  Vernon  (Wolfe)  Hammond,  and 
sister  of  John  Henry  Hammond  and  Ogden  Haggerty 
Hammond,  graduates  of  the  Scientific  School  in  1892  and 
1893,  respectively.  She  survives  him  with  three  children, 
Harriet  Burnside,  Elizabeth  Hammond,  and  Roger  Sher- 
man. He  also  leaves  three  brothers,  Alfred  Dwight  Foster 
(B.A.  Harvard  1873,  LL.B.  Boston  University  1875), 
Roger  Foster  (B.A.  1878,  LL.B.  Columbia  1880,  M.A.  Yale 
1883),  and  Reginald  Foster,  a  graduate  of  Yale  College  in 
1884  and  of  the  Boston  University  Law  School  in  1886, 
and  three  sisters,  one  of  whom  is  the  widow  of  Professor 
James  K.  Thacher  (B.A.  1868,  M.D.  1879).  Dr.  Foster 
was  a  nephew  of  Edward  L.  Baldwin  (B.A.  1842,  LL.B. 
1844),  Roger  S.  Baldwin,  of  the  Class  of  1847,  George  W. 
Baldwin,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1853,  and  Simeon 
E,  Baldwin  (B.A.  1861),  a  former  governor  of  Connecticut; 
a  cousin  of  Roger  S.  Baldwin  (B.A.  1890,  LL.B.  1893, 
LL.M.  1894),  and  an  uncle  of  Henry  C.  Thacher  (B.A. 
1902,  M.S.  1904,  M.D.  Johns  Hopkins  1906)  and  Thomas 
Anthony  Thacher,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1908  and 
of  the  School  of  Law  in  1910. 


William  Pollock,  B.A.   1882 

Born  April  2,  1859,  in  Pittsfield,  Mass. 
Died  November  i,  1916,  in  New  York  City- 
William  Pollock  was  born  April  2,  1859,  in  Pittsfield, 
Mass.,  his  father  being  William  Pollock,  a  prominent  textile 
manufacturer  of  Berkshire  County  for  many  years,  whose 
parents  were  George  and  Margaret  Pollock.  His  mother, 
Susan  (Learned)  Pollock,  was  the  daughter  of  Edward 
and  Elizabeth  (Crawford)  Learned. 

He  was  prepared  for  Yale  at  Phillips  Academy,  Exeter, 
N.  H.,  and  in  his  Freshman  year  served  on  the  Class  Sup- 
per Committee.  He  was  also  a  member  of  the  Junior 
Promenade  and  the  Class  Cup  committees. 

Mr.  Pollock  was  elected  to  membership  in  the  New  York 


3^0  YALE    COLLEGE 

Stock  Exchange  in  the  fall  of  1882,  and  for  the  next  few 
months  was  a  member  of  the  banking  and  brokerage  firm 
of  Pollock  &  Bixby.  The  firm  was  dissolved  in  1883,  and 
after  continuing  the  business  for  about  a  year,  Mr.  Pollock 
retired  from  the  Stock  Exchange.  He  lived  in  New  York 
for  the  next  three  years,  but  was  not  engaged  in  any  busi- 
ness until  1887,  when  he  became  connected  with  the  Housa- 
tonic  Railroad  Company  at  Bridgeport,  Conn.  He  had 
made  his  home  in  Pittsfield  since  1890,  spending  his  winters 
in  New  York.  He  took  an  active  part  in  the  social  life 
of  Pittsfield,  and  was  prominent  in  various  movements 
for  civic  welfare.  He  had  a  stable  of  fine  Kentucky-bred 
horses,  many  of  which  had  taken  prizes  at  horse  shows  in 
various  parts  of  the  country. 

He  had  been  in  failing  health  since  February,  1916,  when 
he  suffered  an  attack  of  typhoid-pneumonia.  His  death 
occurred  at  his  New  York  home,  November  i,  1916,  follow- 
ing an  operation  for  stomach  trouble.  Interment  was  in 
the  family  plot  in  Pittsfield. 

Mr.  Pollock  was  married  August  9,  1882,  to  Mrs.  Fannie 
Dawson  Greenough  of  Wilmington,  N.  C,  the  widow  of 
Charles  Edward  Greenough.  They  were  later  divorced,  and 
on  March  17,  1892,  Mr.  Pollock  married  in  New  York 
City,  Mrs.  Louise.  G.  (Marshall)  Kernochan,  daughter  of 
John  Rutgers  and  Eveline  (Gasquet)  Marshall,  and  widow 
of  John  A.  Kernochan.  By  his  first  marriage,  Mr.  Pollock 
had  a  daughter,  Margaret,  who  survives  him.  His  widow 
is  living,  and  he  also  leaves  a  stepson,  Marshall  R.  Kerno- 
chan, a  sister,  and  two  brothers.  The  latter  are  George  E., 
and  Edward  L.  Pollock,  non-graduate  members  of  the 
Yale  Classes  of  1878  and  1884,  respectively. 


George  Lorenzo  Burton,  B.A.   1883 

Born  July  15,   1863,  in  Adams,  N.  Y. 
Died  July   19,   1916,   at  York  Beach,  Maine 

George  Lorenzo  Burton  was  born  in  Adams,  N.  Y., 
July  15,  1863,  being  the  son  of  George  R.  and  Sarah  F. 
Burton.  His  mother  was  the  daughter  of  Rev.  Lorenzo 
Rice  and  Abagail  Smith.  He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  the 
Hopkins  Grammar  School  in  New  Haven,  Conn.,  and  in 


II 


1882-1883  38 1 

Sophomore  year  in  college  was  a  member  of  the  Class 
Glee  Club.  He  received  a  First  Dispute  Junior  and  a 
Second  Dispute  Senior  appointment. 

Mr.  Burton  taught  modern  languages  at  the  Bradford 
Mansion  School  at  Harrison,  N.  Y.,  during  his  first  year 
out  of  college,  and  from  1884  to  1886  was  instructor  in 
mathematics  and  Latin  at  the  Brooklyn  Collegiate  and 
Polytechnic  Institute.  During  this  latter  period  he  also, 
studied  law  at  Columbia  University,  receiving  in  1886  the 
degree  of  LL.B.  He  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  that  year, 
and  was  afterwards  for  a  short  time  in  the  office  of  Piatt 
&  Bowers  of  New  York  City.  In  1887  he  went  to  Ness 
City,  Kans.,  and  for  the  next  few  years  was  associated  in 
business  with  his  classmate,  the  late  Philo  C.  Black,  editing 
the  Ness  City  Times.  Returning  to  New  Haven  in  1890, 
Mr.  Burton  had  since  been  a  member  of  the  firm  of  George 
R.  Burton  &  Sons,  a  company  engaged  in  the  general  insur- 
ance business  and  founded  by  his  father.  He  had  made  a 
special  study  of  insurance  law  with  particular  reference  to 
the  employers'  liability  and  surety  companies  for  which  his 
firm  act  as  general  agents  for  Connecticut.  He  was  a 
member  of  the  New  Haven  City  Council  for  three  terms, 
being  president  of  the  board  in  1896.  He  was  a  member 
of  the  Governor's  Foot  Guard,  the  Sons  of  the  American 
Revolution,  and  Calvary  Baptist  Church,  New  Haven. 

He  died  suddenly  July  19,  19 16,  at  York  Beach,  Maine, 
where  he  was  spending  the  summer.  His  death  was  due 
to  heart  disease.  Burial  was  in  Evergreen  Cemetery,  New 
Haven. 

Mr.  Burton  was  married  July  6,  1897,  in  that  city,  to 
Emma  Abigail  Woodworth  of  New  Haven.  She  survives 
him  with  a  daughter,  Emily  Rice,  and  a  son,  Robert  Wood- 
worth.  Mr.  Burton's  father  and  two  brothers,  one  being 
Louis  R.  Burton  (LL.B.  1903),  are  also  living. 


Frank  Penrose  Sproul,  B.A.  1883 

Born  August  27,   1862,  in  Philadelphia,  Pa. 
Died  January  18,  1917,  in  Brookline,  Mass. 

Frank   Penrose   Sproul   was  born   August  27,    1862,   in 
Philadelphia,  Pa.,  the  son  of  Robert  Cooper  Grier  Sproul, 


382  YALE    COLLEGE 

a  lawyer,  and  Ada  (Snyder)  Sproul,  and  the  grandson  of 
Henry  Sproul.  He  was  fitted  for  Yale  at  the  Princeton 
(N.  J.)  Preparatory  School,  and  in  his  Junior  year  at 
college  was  given  a  First  Dispute  appointment.  His  Senior 
appointment  w^as  a  Second  Dispute. 

In  the  fall  of  1883,  after  a  summer  spent  abroad,  he 
began  the  study  of  law  in  Pittsburgh  in  the  office  of  Mr. 
Malcolm  Hay.  He  entered  the  Law  School  of  the  Uni- 
versity of  Pennsylvania  in  1884,  and  during  his  course 
there  also  studied  in  the  office  of  Mr.  George  M.  Dallas 
of  Philadelphia.  He  was  graduated  from  the  University 
of  Pennsylvania  in  1886,  and  admitted  to  the  bar  in  that 
year.  He  then  began  the  practice  of  law  in  Pittsburgh,  in 
which  he  continued  until  March,  1914,  during  the  last 
fourteen  years  of  this  period  being  in  partnership  with 
Frederick  C.  Perkins,  a  graduate  of  Yale  College  in  1894 
and  of  the  Harvard  Law  School  in  1896. 

Mr.  Sproul  was  a  member  of  Emmanuel  Protestant 
Episcopal  Church  of  Allegheny  and  of  the  Allegheny 
County  Bar  Association.  After  spending  the  summer  of 
1916  on  the  Maine  coast,  he  took  up  his  residence  at  the 
Hotel  Puritan  in  Boston,  Mass.  On  the*  evening  of  January 
16,  1917,  he  went  with  his  younger  son  to  the  baggage 
room  of  the  hotel  to  look  for  the  boy's  bicycle,  and,  not 
being  familiar  with  the  place,  fell  through  an  unguarded 
door  to  the  bottom  of  the  elevator  shaft,  striking  on  his 
head  and  causing  a  compound  concussion  of  the  brain. 
Two  major  operations  were  performed  in  the  endeavor 
to  save  his  life,  but  without  avail,  and  he  died  without 
regaining  consciousness  on  the  morning  of  January  18,  at 
a  Brookline  hospital.  Interment  was  in  the  Forest  Hills 
(Mass.)  Cemetery. 

He  was  first  married  December  23,  1889,  in  Pittsburgh, 
to  Mary  Walton,  daughter  of  Mark  W.  and  Harriet 
(Marshall)  Watson.  He  was  married  a  second  time  Febru- 
ary 28,  1905,  in  Allegheny,  to  Charlotte  Elizabeth,  daughter 
of  William  R.  and  Alice  M.  (Kennedy)  Howe  of  Pitts- 
burgh. By  his  first  marriage  Mr.  Sproul  had  a  daughter, 
Harriet  Watson,  now  the  wife  of  Capt.  D.  St.  Clair  Bolton 
of  the  British  Army,  and  by  his  second,  two  sons,  Frank 
Penrose  and  William  Howe.  His  wife  and  three  children 
survive  him,  and  he  also  leaves  a  brother,  Henry  Sproul  of 
Pittsburgh,  whose  son,  Henry  Sproul,  Jr.,  is  a  non-graduate 
member  of  the  College  Class  of  191 5. 


1883-1884  383 


George  John  McAndrew,  B.A.   1884 

Born  December  20,  1858,  in  Forestville,  N.  Y. 
Died  August  23,  1916,  in  Stamford,  Conn. 

George  John  McAndrew  was  born  December  20,  1858, 
in  Forestville,  N.  Y.,  his  parents  being  Donald  and  Mar- 
garet (Rennie)  McAndrew,  who  had  come  to  this  country 
from  Scotland  shortly  after  their  marriage.  His  father, 
a  farmer  of  Forestville,  was  the  son  of  George  and  Isabella 
(McMurray)  McAndrew;  one  of  his  brothers  was  instru- 
mental in  introducing  the  Australian  ballot  system.  His 
mother's  parents  were  Samuel  and  Margaret  (Copeland) 
Rennie;  she  had  one  brother  who  was  vice-chancellor  of 
exchequer  under  Queen  Victoria,  another  who  had  served 
as  a  deputy  governor  of  Queensland,  a  third  being  promi- 
nent in  colonial  service  in  New  Zealand,  and  another  who 
was  a  corporal  in  the  British  Army  in  the  War  of  the 
Crimea. 

George  McAndrew  studied  at  the  Forestville  Free  Acad- 
emy and  at  the  Fredonia  (N.  Y.)  Normal  School,  and  in 
1878  entered  Hamilton  College,  spending  a  year  at  that 
institution.  During  1879-80  he  served  as  principal  of  the 
Ellicottville  (N.  Y.)  Union  School,  holding  a  similar  posi- 
tion at  the  Ellington  (N.  Y.)  Academy  the  following  year. 
In  1 88 1  he  joined  the  Yale  Class  of  1884  as  a  Sophomore. 
He  received  a  Second  Dispute  in  Junior  year  and  a  First 
Colloquy  at  Commencement. 

His  later  life  had  been  entirely  given  to  educational 
work.  The  first  four  years  after  his  graduation  were  spent 
at  Pawtucket,  R.  I.,  as  principal  of  the  high  school,  and 
from  1888  to  1890  he  served  as  sub-master  of  the  Hillhouse 
High  School,  New  Haven,  Conn.  In  the  latter  year  he 
moved  to  Plattsburg,  N.  Y.,  where  for  the  next  three 
years  he  held  an  appointment  as  superintendent  of  schools. 
He  was  superintendent  of  the  schools  of  South  Orange, 
N.  J.,  from  1893  to  1900  and  president  of  the  Montana 
State  Normal  School  at  Dillon  during  the  following  year. 
In  1902  he  became  superintendent  of  the  schools  at  Mamar- 
oneck,  N.  Y.,  where  he  continued  until  his  death,  which 
occurred  August  23,  1916,  at  Stamford,  Conn.,  after  a 
month's  illness  following  a  paralytic  stroke,  largely  due  to 
overwork.  Interment  was  in  Prospect  Cemetery  in  his 
native  town. 


3^4  YALE    COLLEGE 

Mr.  McAndrew  was  a  member  of  the  Larchmont  Avenue 
Presbyterian  Church  of  Mamaroneck.  In  1893  he  received 
the  degree  of  M.A.  in  course  from  Yale.  He  had  also 
received  a  Ph.D.  degree  from  Mount  Union-Scio  College, 
Ohio,  in  1900.  He  went  abroad  in  1888,  and  spent  three 
months  in  Germany. 

He  was  married  in  Forestville,  April  25,  1888,  to  Sylvia 
White,  daughter  of  LeRoy  and  Mary  (Johnson)  Hurlbert, 
and  sister  of  John  LeRoy  Hurlbert  (B.A.  1893).  Mrs. 
McAndrew,  who  is  a  non-graduate  member  of  the  Class  of 
1887  at  Mount  Holyoke  College,  survives  her  husband.  He 
leaves  also  four  children,  Mary  Johnson ;  Hurlbert,  a  grad- 
uate of  New  York  University  in  1913;  Georgia,  and 
Marjorie,  and  three  sisters. 


George  Hudson  Makiien,  B.A.   1884 

Born  July  16,  1855,  in  Goshen,  N.  Y. 
Died  February  21,  1917,  in  Goshen,  N.  Y. 

George  Hudson  Makuen  was  born  July  16,  1855,  in 
Goshen,  N.  Y.,  the  son  of  George  Makuen,  a  farmer,  and 
Ellen  Gertrude  (Magennis)  Makuen.  Both  parents  were 
born  in  Ireland,  his  father  being  of  Scotch  descent,  and 
his  mother  of  English  descent.  He  attended  the  Seward 
School  at  Florida,  N.  Y.,  and  the  Centenary  Collegiate 
Institute,  Hackensack,  N.  J.,  afterwards  becoming  a  teacher 
in  the  latter  school.  He  remained  there  until  January, 
1881,  when  he  joined  the  Yale  Class  of  1884.  As  a  Sopho- 
more he  received  a  second  prize  in  English  composition 
and  a  first  prize  in  declamation.  He  was  given  a  First 
Dispute  appointment  in  Junior  year,  and  won  the  first  prize 
at  the  Junior  Exhibition.  He  served  as  an  editor  of  the 
Pot-Pourri  in  Senior  year. 

For  several  years  after  graduation  he  taught  elocution 
and  oratory  in  the  National  School  of  Oratory  in  Phila- 
delphia. In  1886  he  began  the  study  of  medicine  at  Jef- 
ferson Medical  College,  at  the  same  time  continuing  his 
teaching  activities.  In  1889  he  received  his  medical  degree, 
and  after  being  engaged  in  general  practice  in  Philadelphia 
for  a  few  years,  began  to  specialize  in  laryngology,  rhinol- 
ogy,  and  otology,  taking  a  particular  interest  in  treatment 
for  defects  of  speech  and  voice.     He  had  written  exten- 


i884  385 

sively  on  this  subject,  and  also  on  diseases  of  the  throat, 
nose,  and  ear.  From  1889  to  1892  he  served  on  the  faculty 
of  Jefferson  Medical  College,  and  in  1897  he  was  made 
professor  of  defects  of  speech  at  the  Polyclinic  Hospital 
and  College  for  Graduates  in  Medicine  at  Philadelphia.  He 
was  later  consultant  in  defects  of  speech  at  the  Vineland 
(N.  J.)  Training  School  for  Feeble-minded  Children  and 
consultant  to  the  Chester,  St.  Mary's,  and  the  Frederick 
Douglass  Memorial  hospitals.  He  was  a  member  of  a 
number  of  medical  societies,  and  was  president  of  the 
American  Academy  of  Medicine  in  1900,  of  the  American 
Laryngological,  Rhinological  and  Otological  Society  in 
1912,  and  of  the  American  Laryngological  Association  in 
1916.  In  1909  he  was  a  delegate  to  the  International  Con- 
gress in  Budapest.  Dr.  Makuen  was  chosen  president  of 
the  Yale  Alumni  Association  of  Philadelphia  in  1904,  and 
in  that  position  and  as  a  representative  of  that  association 
made  many  addresses  to  the  alumni  of  Yale  and  other  'col- 
leges. He  was  a  member  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal 
Church  of  Goshen. 

His  death  occurred  very  suddenly,  from  heart  trouble, 
February  21,  1917,  at  the  home  of  his  brother  in  that  town. 
He  had  gone  there  for  a  few  days'  visit.  He  was  buried 
in  Slate  Hill  Cemetery  at  Goshen. 

On  December  20,  1900,  Dr.  Makuen  was  married  in 
Chester,  Pa.,  to  Mrs.  Nancy  (Baker)  Dyer,  daughter  of 
George  and  Martha  Baker  of  Chester,  and  widow  of  Col. 
Samuel  A.  Dyer.  They  lived  in  Chester  until  19 14,  and 
afterwards  in  Newfield,  N.  J.  Mrs.  Makuen  survives  him, 
and  he  also  leaves  three  brothers  and  a  sister.  Dr.  Makuen 
had  no  children.  His  stepsons,  Samuel  Ashmead  Dyer  and 
Richard.  Wetherill  Dyer,  have  both  studied  at  Yale,  the 
former  having  graduated  from  the  Scientific  School  in  1913 
and  the  latter  being  a  non-graduate  member  of  the  College 
Class  of  1914. 


John  Ira  Souther,  B.A.   1884 

Born  February  25,   1861,  in  Worcester,  Mass. 
Died  January  20,  1917,  in  Richmond,  Va. 

John  Ira  Souther  was  born  in  Worcester,  Mass.,  Febru- 
ary 25,  1861,  the  son  of  Rev.  Samuel  Souther  (B.A.  Dart- 


3^6  YALE    COLLEGE 

mouth  1842,  Bangor  Theological  Seminary  1846),  whose 
parents  were  Samuel  Souther  and  Mary  (Webster) 
Souther,  the  latter  being  a  cousin  of  Daniel  Webster  and 
a  grandniece  of  Gen.  John  Stark.  His  father,  who  was 
for  some  years  city  missionary  of  Worcester,  served  in 
the  Massachusetts  Legislature  in  1862-63,  enlisted  in  the 
Fifty-seventh  Massachusetts  Regiment  in  1863,  and  was 
killed  in  the  battle  of  the  Wilderness,  May  6,  1864,  at  that 
time  ranking  as  a  colonel.  The  pioneer  member  of  the 
Souther  family  in  this  country  was  Nathaniel  Souther,  who 
came  from  England  about  1630  and  settled  in  Plymouth 
Colony,  of  which  he  was  elected  secretary  October  4,  1635. 
John  I.  Souther's  great-grandfather,  Thomas  Stickney, 
served  as  colonel  of  a  N.ew  Hampshire  regiment  during 
the  Revolutionary  War;  other  ancestors  on  the  paternal 
side  were  Tristram  Coffin,  Paul  Coffin  (B.A.  Harvard  1759, 
S.T.D.  Harvard  1812),  and  Hugh  Stirling.  His  mother 
was' Mary  Frances,  daughter  of  Ira  and  Sarah  (Clement) 
Towle.  She  was  descended  from  Robert  Clement,  who 
emigrated  to  America  from  England  in  1642,  settling  at 
Haverhill,  Mass. 

After  graduating  from  the  Worcester  High  School,  he 
entered  the  Worcester  Polytechnic  Institute,  from  which 
he  took  the  degree  of  B.S.  in  1881.  He  was  valedictorian 
of  his  high  school  class,  and  held  the  same  honor  at  the 
Polytechnic  Institute.  He  joined  the  Yale  Class  of  1884 
in  Sophomore  year,  receiving  a  second  prize  in  mathematics 
in  that  year  and  again  in  Senior  year.  His  Junior  appoint- 
ment was  a  Philosophical  Oration  and  his  Senior  appoint- 
ment a  High  Oration,  and  he  was  elected  to  membership 
in  Phi  Beta  Kappa.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Class  Crew 
for  two  years,  of  the  Class  Baseball  Team  three  years,  and 
of  the  University  Baseball  Team  as  a  Junior  and  Senior. 
He  won  the  middle-weight  wrestling  contest  in  Sophomore 
year. 

Mr.  Souther  taught  physics  and  chemistry  in  the  Worces- 
ter High  School  for  a  year  after  graduation  from  Yale, 
and  then  opened  a  chemical  laboratory  at  Ironwood,  Mich. 
His  work  in  this  direction  won  for  him  a  reputation  as  an 
expert  in  the  analysis  and  treatment  of  iron  ore.  In  March, 
1892,  he  became  assistant  superintendent  of  blast  furnaces 
for  the  Illinois  Steel  Company,  a  position  which  he  held 
for  three  years.    From  1895  to  1900  he  was  connected  with 


i884  387 

the  Eellaire  Steel  Company  at  Bellaire,  Ohio,  as  super- 
intendent of  their  blast  furnaces,  and  for  the  next  eleven 
years  held  a  similar  position  with  the  Cambria  Steel  Com- 
pany at  Johnstown,  Pa.  In  1914  he  removed  to  Cleveland, 
Ohio,  where,  until  January,  191 7,  he  was  engaged  in  the 
sale  of  refractories. 

He  went  to  Richmond,  Va.,  to  visit  his  son  early  in  1917, 
and  his  death  occurred  in  that  city  on  January  20,  after  a 
brief  illness  of  peritonitis.  His  body  was  taken  to  Cleveland 
for  burial  in  Lake  View  Cemetery. 

Mr.  Souther  was  a  member  of  St.  Mark's  Protestant 
Episcopal  Church  of  Johnstown,  serving  as  a  vestryman 
for  several  years. 

He  was  married  January  i,  1889,  in  Cleveland,  Ohio,  to 
Kate  Amelia,  daughter  of  Samuel  Augustus  and  Julia  Eliza- 
beth (Clark)  Fuller.  She  survives  him  with  three  children: 
Helen  Fuller,  who  was  married  April  14,  1914,  to  Newton 
Keith  Hartford  (B.S.  Harvard  1909)  ;  Hugh  Stirling,  and 
Arthur  Fuller,  who  graduated  from  Yale  with  the  degree 
of  Ph.B.  in  1914  and  191 7,  respectively.  Another  daughter, 
Julia  Fuller,  died  in  infancy.  Besides  his  wife  and  three 
children,  Mr.  Souther  is  survived  by  his  mother,  two  sisters, 
and  a  brother,  the  latter  being  William  Towle  Souther,  a 
graduate  of  the  College  in  1873  ^^^^  of  the  Harvard  Medical 
School  in  18^8.  An  elder  brother,  Samuel  Adams  Souther, 
who  was  a  member  of  the  College  Class  of  1874  for  a  year, 
died  in  1898.  Mr.  Souther's  nephew,  the  late  Richard 
Clement  Whittier,  graduated  from  the  Scientific  School  in 
1905. 

Joseph  Tomlinson,  B.A.   1884 

Born   March   15,   1863,   in   Huntington,   Conn. 
Died  May  20,  1916,  in  Redding  Ridge,  Conn. 

Joseph  Tomlinson,  one  of  the  five  children  of  Joseph  and 
Anne  Tappan  (Brewster)  Tomlinson,  was  born  March  15, 
1863,  in  Huntington,  Conn.  His  father  was  superintendent 
of  the  Star  Pin  Company,  and  had  held  various  town  offices 
in  Huntington,  including  those  of  judge  of  probate,  town 
judge,  and  town  clerk ;  he  was  the  son  of  Joseph  Tomlinson, 
a  physician,  and  Sarah  Eliza  (Bennett)  Tomlinson.  The 
pioneer  member  of  the  Tomlinson  family  in  this  country 
was  Henry  Tomlinson,  who  came  with  his  wife  and  two 


3^8  YALE    COLLEGE 

children  from  England  to  Milford,  Conn.,  in  1652.  In  the 
direct  line  of  descent  was  Lieut.  Joseph  Tomlinson,  who 
fought  in  the  War  of  the  Revolution.  On  the  maternal 
side,  Joseph  Tomlinson  was  descended  from  Elder  William 
Brewster  and  from  William  and  Sarah  Homes,  the  latter 
being  the  sister  of  Benjamin  Franklin.  His  mother's  par- 
ents were  Rev.  Cyrus  Brewster,  who  studied  in  the  Theo- 
logical Department  from  1839  to  1841,  also  taking  work 
in  the  College,  and  received  the  honorary  degree  of  B.A. 
from  the  University  in  the  latter  year,  and  Anne  (Tappan) 
Brewster. 

He  was  fitted  for  college  at  the  high  school  in  Derby, 
Conn.,  and  in  his  Sophomore  year  was  given  a  second 
prize  in  English  composition.  His  appointments  were  First 
Disputes,  and  he  was  one  of  the  speakers  at  Commence- 
ment. While  an  undergraduate  he  was  correspondent  for 
the  New  Haven  Journal-Courier. 

He  spent  the  first  three- years  after  graduation  as  a  private 
tutor.  During  this  period  he  lived  with  his  pupil's  family 
at  Mamaroneck,  N.  Y.,  and  in  California,  and  traveled  with 
them  around  the  world.  In  1887  he  entered  the  paper 
barrel  business  in  Hartford,  Conn.,  but  after  about  a  year 
removed  to  Sioux  Falls,  S.  Dak.  There  he  purchased  a 
part  interest  in  the  Argus-Leader,  continuing  as  its  editor 
until  1905.  He  was  active  in  politics  and  civic,  matters,  and 
in  all  state  interests  of  a  broad  nature.  In  1905  Mr.  Tom- 
linson became  interested  in  a  newly  invented  machine  for 
addressing  newspapers,  gave  up  journalism,  and  became 
director,  vice-president,  and  general  manager  of  the  Cox 
Multi-Mailer  Company.  He  gave  his  attention  to  the 
development  and  selling  of  newspaper  addressing  machines 
during  the  remainder  of  his  life,  at  first  having  his  office 
in  New  York  City,  but  later  in  Chicago,  111.,  where  he  lived 
at  the  time  of  his  death.  He  owned  a  farm  at  Bethel,  Conn., 
on  which  he  spent  his  leisure  time.  He  was  a  member 
of  the  Second  Congregational  Church  of  Derby,  Conn. 

He  died  at  his  sister's  home  at  Redding  Ridge,  Conn., 
May  20,  1916.  He  had  suffered  from  cancer  for  several 
years,  but  was  able  to  attend  to  his  business  affairs  up  to 
within  ten  weeks  of  his  death,  when  his  condition  became 
very  serious.  H^  was  buried  in  Riverside  Cemetery  at 
Shelton,  Conn. 

'  Mr.  Tomlinson  was  married  at  Sioux  Falls,  November 
14,  1900,  to  Blanche  Ferneyhough  Bliss,  who  survives  him 


I 


I884-I885  3S9 

without  children.  He  also  leaves  three  sisters,  two  of 
whom  married  Yale  men,  one  being  the  wife  of  Charles 
Wellington  Shelton  (B.D.  1881)  and  the  other  of  Daniel 
Sammis  Sanford,  a  graduate  of  the  College  in  1882.  Mrs. 
Shelton  was  a  student  for  three  years  in  the  Yale  School 
of  the  Fine  Arts,  and  Mrs.  Sanford  received  the  degree 
of  B.S.  from  Wellesley  College  in  1893,  afterwards  taking 
a  post-graduate  course  at  Yale. 


John  Cloyse  Bridgman,  B.A.   1885 

Born  December  22,  1862,  in  Andover,  Mass. 
Died  May  28,  1917,  in  Wilkes  Barre,  Pa. 

John  Cloyse  Bridgman  was  born  December  2.2,  1862,  in 
Andover,  Mass.,  his  father,  Isaac  Bridgman  (B.A.  Dart- 
mouth 1856,  Ph.D.  Dartmouth  1886),  being  at  that  time 
a  teacher  in  Phillips  Academy.  The  latter,  a  son  of  Isaac 
and  Lucy  (Chandler)  Bridgman,  was  descended  from 
James  Bridgman,  who  came  from  Winchester,  England, 
in  1640  and  settled  in  Massachusetts.  He  married  Mary 
Elizabeth  Gleason,  a  graduate  of  Mount  Holyoke  in  1853, 
whose  parents  were  John  C.  and  Margaret  Ann  (Duncan) 
Gleason.  She  was  of  English  descent,  her  ancestors  having 
settled  at  Framingham,  Mass.,  in  1670.  John  C.  Bridgman 
was  the  second  of  their  five  children. 

At  the  time  when  he  entered  Yale,  the  family  home  was 
in  Cleveland,  Ohio,  where  his  father  was  principal  of  the 
Cleveland  Academy.  He  had  received  his  preparatory 
training  at  the  Hopkins  Grammar  School,  New  Haven, 
Conn.,  and  in  his  Freshman  year  was  awarded  a  first 
Berkeley  premium  and  a  second  Gamma  Nu  declamation 
prize.  The  next  year  he  was  given  two  first  prizes  in 
English  composition,  and  in  Senior  year  he  received  a 
Townsend  premium.  His  appointments  were  Philosophical 
Orations,  and  he  was  a  member  of  Phi  Beta  Kappa  and 
Chi  Delta  Theta.  He  served  on  the  editorial  board  of  the 
Nezvs  in  Sophomore  year  and  on  that  of  the  Yale  Literary 
Magazine  in  Senior  year.  In  Freshman  year  he  was  a 
member  of  the  Class  Glee  Club  and  the  Class  Supper 
Committee. 

He  taught  at  the  Harry  Hillman  Academy  in  Wilkes 
Barre,   Pa.,   from   1885   to   1887,  also   studying  law   for  a 


39°  YALE    COLLEGE 

brief  period,  and  then  entered  the  employ  of  the  Hazard 
Manufacturing  Company.  In  1899,  ^^ter  serving  succes- 
sively as  a  clerk,  salesman,  and  secretary  of  the  company, 
he  was  made  general  manager,  and  continued  in  that  posi- 
tion for  the  remainder  of  his  life.  He  had  always  interested 
himself  actively  in  every  movement  for  the  betterment  of 
the  community.  He  had  been  a  vestryman  of  St.  Stephen's 
Protestant  Episcopal  Church,  a  trustee  of  the  Harry  Hill- 
man  Academy,  a  governor  and  president  of  the  Wyoming 
Valley  Country  Club,  a  director  of  the  Young  Men's 
Christian  Association  and  the  Boys'  Industrial  Association, 
being  chairman  of  the  board  of  the  last  named,  first 
president  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and  a  member 
of  the  City  Planning  Commission.  He  was  a  prominent 
member  of  the  Yale  Alumni  Association  of  the  Wyoming 
Valley.  A  book  entitled  "Brief  Declamations,"  compiled 
by  Mr.  Bridgman,  was  published  in  1890. 

He  died  suddenly,  of  heart  failure,  at  his  home  in  Wilkes 
Barre,  May  28,  1917,  and  was  buried  in  the  Forty  Fort 
Cemetery. 

Mr.  Bridgman  was  married  June  7,  1905,  in  St.  Johns- 
bury,  Vt.,  to  Ethel  Young,  daughter  of  David  Young 
Comstock  (B.A.  Amherst  1873)  and  Augusta  Sprague 
(Tenney)  Comstock.  She  survives  him  with  their  two  sons, 
David  Comstock  and  John  Cloyse.  He  also  leaves  a  sister 
and  a  brother,  Walter  R.  Bridgman,  who  was  graduated 
from  the  College  in  1881,  received  an  honorary  M.A.  at 
Miami  in  1891  and  at  Yale  in  1892,  and  is  now  professor 
of  Greek  at  Lake  Forest  College.  Two  of  the  latter's  sons, 
Donald  Storrs  and  Ray  Claflin  Bridgman,  have  attended 
Yale;  the  former  graduated  from  the  College  in  1913,  and 
the  latter  was  for  nearly  three  years  a  member  of  the 
Class  of  191 7,  having  left  to  enter  the  aviation  service  in 
France,  where  he  is  now  (July,  191 7)  a  member  of  the 
Lafayette  Escadrille. 


Louis  Austin  Mansfield,  B.A.   1885 

Born  March  it,  1863,  in  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Died  January  7,   1917,  in  New   Haven,   Conn. 

Louis  Austin  Mansfield  was  born  in  New  Haven,  Conn., 
March  11,  1863.     Fie  was  the  only  son  of  Austin  and  Emily 


i885  391 

Althea  (Ford)  Mansfield,  and  a  descendant  of  Richard 
Mansfield,  who  settled  in  New  Haven  Colony  in  1639.  His 
father  was  the  son  of  Jesse  Merrick  and  Charlotte  (Heaton) 
Mansfield,  and  his  mother's  parents  were  Merrit  and  Althea 
(LaForge)  Ford.  Educated  at  Hopkins  Grammar  School, 
he  entered  Yale  in  1881,  and  was  graduated  in  1885, 
receiving  in  his  Senior  year  a  Second  Colloquy  appointment. 

After  graduation  he  entered  the  lumber  business  with  his 
father,  whom  he  succeeded  on  the  latter's  death  in  1898. 
The  firm  had  been  in  operation  since  1854.  Mr.  Mansfield 
was  one  of  the  prime  movers  in  the  organization  of  the 
Lumber  Dealers  Association  of  Connecticut,  organized  in 
1892,  and  for  twenty  years  served  as  its  secretary.  In  1913 
he  was  elected  vice-president  and  in  1914  president,  which 
latter  office  he  held  at  the  time  of  his  death.  He  was  also 
secretary  of  the  Eastern  States  Retail  Lumber  Dealers 
Association,  and  a  director  of  the  Lumber  Mutual  Fire 
Insurance  Company  of  Boston,  Mass.,  and  the  Pennsyl- 
vania Lumbermen's  Mutual  Fire  Insurance  Company  of 
Philadelphia,  to  which  two  boards  he  was  elected  in  1905. 
He  was  a  vestryman  of  St.  Thomas'  Protestant  Episcopal 
Church  for  some  years,  being  also  at  one  time  treasurer 
of  its  Sunday  school.  He  was  an  active  member  of  the 
Chamber  of  Commerce  until  five  years 'ago,  ill  health  pre- 
venting further  participation  in  that,  as  well  as  in  other 
civic  matters. 

His  death  occurred  January  7,  1917,  at  his  home  in  New 
Haven,  after  a  brief  illness  from  pneumonia,  and  he  was 
buried  in  the  family  plot  in  Evergreen  Cemetery.  His 
health  had  not  been  good  since  191 1,  although  it  was  some- 
what improved  after  a  year's  rest  in  1912,  when  he  spent 
several  months  in  Jamaica. 

He  was  married  in  New  Milford,  Conn.,  August  14, 
1890,  to  Mary  Frances,  daughter  of  Truman  E.  and  Frances 
E.  (Wheeler)  Hurd.  They  had  no  children.  Besides  his 
wife,  Mr.  Mansfield  is  survived  by  his  mother.  He  was 
a  nephew  of  Howard  Mansfield  (B.A.  1871)  and  Burton 
Mansfield,  a  graduate  of  the  Scientific  School  in  1875  and 
of  the  School  of  Law  in  1878.  His  cousin,  Henry  L. 
Gower,  graduated  from  the  College  in  1880. 


392  YALE    COLLEGE 


Dudley  Leavitt,  B.A.   1886 

Born  July  i6,  1864,  in  West  Stockbridge,  Mass. 
Died  August  23,  1914,  in  Pittsfield,  Mass. 

Dudley  Leavitt  was  the  son  of  William  Whipple  and 
Emma  (Sanford)  Leavitt,  and  was  born  July  16,  1864,  in 
West  Stockbridge,  Mass.  His  father  graduated  from  Wil- 
liams in  1859,  receiving  the  degree  of  M.D.  from  the 
College  of  Physicians  and  Surgeons  at  Columbia  the  fol- 
lowing year;  he  served  in  the  United  States  Navy  during 
the  Civil  War,  at  first  as  an  assistant  surgeon  and  afterwards 
as  surgeon  on  a  gunboat,  and  later  became  well  known 
as  a  physician  in  Berkshire  County,  Mass.,  his  home  now 
being  in  Pittsfield.  Dudley  Leavitt's  paternal  grandparents 
were  Dudley  and  Lydia  (Whipple)  Leavitt;  the  latter  was 
the  daughter  of  Samuel  Whipple,  and  a  descendant  of 
Sherman  Whipple,  who  came  from  England  to  eastern 
Massachusetts,  later  removing  to  New  London,  N.  H.  His 
mother  was  the  daughter  of  John  and  Emma  J.  Sanford 
of  Great  Barrington,  Mass. 

He  was  fitted  for  college  at  Williston  Seminary,  East- 
hampton,  Mass.,  and  spent  four  years  at  Yale  as  a  member 
of  the  Class  of  1^86.  He  did  not,  however,  receive  his 
degree  until  1890,  when  it  was  granted  to  him  by  a  vote  of 
the  Corporation. 

In  1887,  after  spending  a  year  studying  in  Pittsfield,  he 
began  the  study  of  medicine  at  the  College  of  Physicians 
and  Surgeons,  where,  in  1.890,  he  was  given  his  medical 
degree.  For  the  next  two  years  he  was  an  interne  on  the 
staff  of  the  French  Hospital  in  New  York  City.  At  the 
completion  of  his  service  he  was  appointed  physician  at 
the  dispensary  operated  in  connection  with  that  hospital,  and 
at  about  the  same  time  was  made  assistant  physician  to 
the  eye,  ear,  and  throat  department  of  the  Northwestern 
Dispensary.  In  1894  he  opened  an  office  in  New  York 
City,  but  a  year  afterwards  returned  to  his  home  in  Pitts- 
field to  attend  to  his  father's  practice  during  the  latter's 
absence  in  Europe.  He  continued  in  practice  there  until 
1906,  when  he  was  compelled  to  retire  on  account  of  ill 
health.    ' 

Dr.  Leavitt  was  a  member  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal 
Church,  being  a  communicant  of  St.  Stephen's  Church  of 
Pittsfield,  and  he  belonged  to  the  Berkshire  Medical  Society. 


1886-1887  393 

His  death  occurred  at  the  House  of  Mercy  Hospital  in 
Pittsfield,  August  23,  19 14,  as  the  result  of  lung  fever.  He 
was  buried  in  West  Stockbridge. 

Dr.  Leavitt  was  married  September  7,  1893,  in  Bain- 
bridge,  N.  Y.,  to  Lura  Redfield,  daughter  of  Abner  Marshall 
and  Rhoby  H.  Smith  of  Bainbridge,  N.  Y.  She  survives 
him  with  their  two  children,  Dudley  Williams  and  Dorothy 
Dudley.  The  latter  is  a  member  of  the  Class  of  1920  at 
Elmira  College. 


George  Edwin  Hill,  B.A.  1887 

Born  July  2,  1864,  in  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 
Died  September  30,  1916,  in  Bridgeport,  Conn. 

George  Edwin  Hill,  son  of  Charles  Edwin  and  Susan 
Frances  (Wilbur)  Hill,  was  born  July  2,  1864,  in  Brooklyn, 
N.  Y.  His  father,  who  conducted  a  tea  importing  business 
in  New  York  City  under  the  name  of  Charles  E.  Hill  & 
Company,  was  the  son  of  William  and  Elizabeth  (Buffum) 
Hill.  His  mother's  parents  were  John  Wilbur,  Jr.,  and 
Mary  (Helm)  Wilbur.  He  was  descended  from  John  Hill, 
who  settled  in  Dover,  N.  H.,  about  1644,  having  come  to 
this  country  from  England,  and  from  John  Wilbur,  the 
founder  of  the  Wilburite  branch  of  Quakers  of  Rhode 
Island,  and  a  descendant  of  early  English  settlers  of  that 
state. 

In  college  he  was  the  recipient  of  a  second  prize  in 
English  composition  in  Sophomore  year  and  of  Second 
Dispute  appointments.  He  had  been  fitted  for  Yale  at 
H.  U.  King's  School  in  Stamford,  Conn.,  his  home  since 
1876,  and  after  taking  his  degree  he  returned  there  as  a 
teacher.  Two  years  were  spent  in  this  way,  and  in  1889 
he  entered  the  Yale  School  of  Law,  from  which  he  was 
graduated  in  1891,  receiving  at  that  time  the  Townsend 
prize  for  delivering  the  best  oration. 

In  the  fall  of  that  year  he  began  practice  in  Bridgeport, 
where  he  had  since  followed  his  profession.  From.  1893 
to  1902  he  was  in  partnership  with  John  H.  Perry  (B.A. 
1870,  LL.B.  Columbia  1872)  and  Winthrop  H.  Perry,  a 
graduate  of  the  College  in  1876  and  of  the  School  of  Law 
in  1882,  under  the  name  of  Perry,  Perry  &  Hill,  and  he 
was  afterwards  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Hall  &  Hill.  On 
the  death  of  his  partner,  Edwin  F.  Hall  (LL.M.  1893)   in 


394  YALE    COLLEGE 

1907,  the  firm  became  Hill  &  Boardman,  his  partner  being 
William  B.  Boardman  (B.A.  1893,  LL.B.  1898).  Mr.  Hill 
had  become  one  of  the  best-known  lawyers  in  the  state, 
and  was  considered  one  of  the  leading  citizens  of  Bridge- 
port, where  he  had  resided  since  1893.  He  served  as 
president  of  the  Bridgeport  Bar  Association  in  1910-11  and 
of  the  State  Bar  Association  from  1910  to  1912.  At  the 
time  of  his  death  he  was  county  health  officer  for  Fairfield 
County,  having  held  that  office  by  successive  appointments 
since  1894. 

Mr.  Hill  was  one  of  the  five  trustees  appointed  by  the 
Department  of  Justice  at  Washington  in  1914  to  take  over 
the  management  of  the  trolley  systems  in  Connecticut  pre- 
viously controlled  by  the  New  York,  New  Haven  &  Hart- 
ford Railroad  Company.  He  had  been  a  trustee  of  the 
Mechanics  &  Farmers  Savings  Bank  of  Bridgeport.  In 
1903  he  ran  for  mayor  of  the  city,  being  the  candidate  of  the 
Republican  party,  but  it  was  a  year  of  Democratic  victory, 
and  he  was  not  elected.  In  1904  he  served  as  chairman 
of  the  Republican  Town  and  City  Committee.  Only  a  few 
days  before  his  death  he  was  chosen  as  a  vice-president 
of  the  Hughes  Alliance  in  Connecticut.  He  served  as 
president  of  the  Board  of  Police  Commissioners  from  1906 
to  1909,  and  for  several  years  was  a  member  of  the  State 
Board  of  Accountancy.  He  gave  freely  and  constantly  of 
his  money,  time,  and  energy  to  the  service  of  Yale.  For 
a  long  time  he  was  secretary  of  the  Yale  Alumni  Associa- 
tion of  Fairfield  County,  was  its  vice-president